How to attach leads straight to battery?

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It seems my IBM Thinkpad's CMOS battery has died, and it's know that it won't boot wihtout it.
I don't have time to wait for a new one by mail, plus I have some CR2032's in my fridge. The flat things that look like litttle frisbees.
The current one has the wires connected to metal tabs stuck (welded?) to the battery on both sides. Is there a way I can do this without exploding or otherwise ruining the battery???????
I see that Radio Shack has a clip that holds such a battery but I think it's too thick to fit. I just tore apart a 16 year old computetr to get it's battery holder, but it was defintiely too thick (Does anyone want a kit to make a 16 year-old computer?)
Thanks.
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wrote:

I didn't think solderign would work, but it occurs to me that somewhere I have a mini torch, with one or two little tanks of gas, 2 or 3" tall, that is supposed to get very hot at a small place. Maybe I could solder the wires to the battery with that???

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Can you confirm that the Thinkpad manual nowhere says whether and how to replace the battery?
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Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On Sat, 23 Jul 2011 15:21:53 -0400, "Don Phillipson"

I've done it (in a pinch) with the silver defroster grid repair, or silver Printed circuit repair pen to make the contact, backed up with a chunck of appropriately sized shrink tubing to give mechanical strength.. It is NOT robust - but works in a pinch.
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micky wrote:

They use spot welds for a reason. A spot welder wouldn't do nearly as much thermal damage to the CR2032 as soldering would. It would probably ruin whatever functions as a separator between the two halves of the battery.
None of the datasheets I've downloaded for CR2032, list short term temperature as a parameter (like whether it could support a solder profile). The max operating temp is listed as 60C or 70C, which isn't nearly enough for soldering, even with low temp alloys. And the cell surface could be stainless, meaning you'd need a solder that "sticks" to that stuff. If the solder had a bit of silver added to it, that would probably push the melt point too high.
You could think a bit more creatively than that. For example, how many "holes or storage spaces" are currently available or unused on the unit. Perhaps you can craft a 3V source, using a couple regular dry cells. At Radio Shack, I could pick up a two cell holder, two dry cells (1.5V each), then use the wire on the existing dead CR2032 assembly, and solder that wire to the tabs on the plastic battery holder. It's just a matter of routing the wire inside the laptop, using any available holes. The battery pack would hold you over until the new CR2032 assembly comes in the mail.
You could build a regulated circuit to run off the main battery, but then, if left that way, you could dangerously discharge the main battery. Some battery chargers will not charge a laptop battery, if the battery ever heads below a certain threshold.
I think it's slightly safer, to just build a battery source using dry cells.
Have you ever tried to find a 3.0V output three terminal regulator in town ? That is probably a mail order item as well, and will take just as long to get here, as the pigtailed CR2032 will. The battery holder and dry cells, I can think of two stores in town that can provide them for me.
Paul
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There are a LOT of sources for the lithium button cells with wires attached - with the wrong plug ends on them - in most major centers. Most electronics supply shops or pattery specialists will have one you can cobble the correct wire end onto
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

But I don't buy stuff just anywhere :-)
I bought coin cells at the mall, from a "battery store", and they were flat in a matter of days. I'm a little more careful now, where I get stuff. I need to know a shop has a good "turnover of stock", so I won't get screwed again.
If some computer store here carried a pigtailed CR2032, chances are it's been sitting in the shop window for the last twenty years.
The same thing could happen with mail order, unless the seller is big enough that their stock is fresh.
Hmmm. Too bad this is a "web only" item. I guess it would hurt them, to have this in a retail store.
http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId307341
Paul
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Paul wrote:

Hi, eBay is a friend some times. I get all the button batteries from eBay. I just make sure they are brand names.
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On 7/23/2011 3:11 PM, micky wrote:

The connection tabs on such cells is done with a specialized spot welding machine which avoids excessive heating to the metal which will at the very least shorten the life of the cell, will sometimes kill it entirely, or sometimes yield a nice explosion (especially with lithium I suspect).
Probably something on this page:
http://shopping.microbattery.com/s.nl/sc.2/category.708/.f
would be of help in your quest to connect.
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Hmm, Look hard you can find a battery with soldering tab.
micky wrote:

Hi,You can find a battery with soldering tabs. I am a LONG term TP user. 4 of them in the house.
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wrote:

Just got rid of 3 370s, two 700s and 3 or 4 600s (Es and Xs) within the last couple of months. Still have a T43 in my DJ box.
TOUGH machines!!!!!
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Somewhere on teh intarwebs snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yup. I'm typing this on a T60, my newest TP, and I have another dozen or so going back to about 2003 around the place, most working, the rest being repaired.
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micky wrote:

The battery is not involved in the boot process.
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And for the boot sequence?
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The BIOS settings are controlled by the battery, I think with an empty battry, he use the defaults.
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wrote:

I should have tried it with the battery out -- sort of too late now (I should have read this post Saturrday instead of Sunday at midnight)-- , but I found webpages describing the 161 and 163 error numbers on a Thinkpad, at least some of them, and they all agreed it was the CMOS battery.
In addition, I once had a MAC II, and though they are famous for being better designed than PC's, the guy at the computer user group I used to go to told me that they too will not boot without a good cmos battery. And in the case of that computer, the battery was soldered in, and almost everyone ended up taking it to repairman to be serviced, JUST for this battrey. That's two levels worse than most PCs. Oh, and apparently it was a secret back then that the battery was the problem. So that's 3 levels worse. What he woudl do is put in a battery holder for 2 AAA batteries iirc. so customers wouldn't have to pay him a second time. Or maybe he was just talking about his own computers and friends'.
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On Sat, 23 Jul 2011 23:48:31 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Good to know. And it also means I didn't lose out by not reading the previous post yesterday.
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wrote:

On a TP it IS. If the CMOS is invalid, many TPs will NOT boot - period.
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wrote:

Apprarently not. The fefaults must be good enough.
All I did is replace the battery, and it boots from a bootable CD. It wouldn't do that before. It still won't boot from the HDD, because I did sometthing wrong to the HDD, but the Hiren's Boot CD does see the HDD.
(No time to work on it more for about two weeks. Going out of town. No time even to read replies. I'll post again when I get back.)

Well, this machine was unplugged for 2+ years, during which time the CMOS battery went dead** so the contents at that point were, I suppose, empty or invalid, but putting in the cmos battery did sometihng and now it's booting.
**(and probably the laptop battery too, which I probably recharged partially by now.
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NOT true on many of the early TPs.. At least one of my old 600s (E or X, cannot remember which) would not boot at all with a dead CMOS battery, and IIRC the T43 would not either. Had to replace the CMOS batteries on a few to get them to boot.
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