How to attach a rain gutter ????

We have a pole barn. It's covered with modern painted ribbed steel. The steel on the roof extends approx 6 inches past the wall, thus the end of the roof steel sheets are sticking out, with no framing (wood) under them. This makes sense because otherwise all the runoff water would run down the wall.
I want to install about 12 feet of rain gutter above the 9 foot long sliding door, so there isn't always a mudhole in front of the door during rainy seasons. (the rest of the barn does not need gutters).
The problem is, how do I attach the gutters with this 6 inches of tin hanging past the wall? (Cutting off the tin is not an option). I dont care what type of rain gutter is used. It can be the modern K-style steel, or the plastic, or even the old fashioned round stuff (if they still sell it). I don't intend to use a downspout. I just want the water from the roof kept away from the door. Besides the mud in front of the door, if the wind is blowing a certain way, the roof water blows inside the barn when the door is open (which is usually is during hot weather, so the animals stay cool).
Does anyone know how to deal with this? Do they make a special gutter for this sort of application? (I did think if stacking several 2x4's and attaching them to the wall, but that seems rather clumbsy and ugly in appearance).
Thanks for all help.
David
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

Attach a run of 2x4 to the wall, then attach the gutter to the 2x4.
--
Dave www.davebbq.com

What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
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buffalo ny: some thoughts, who needs the water, what is its secondary use, where must the water be legally put compared to where you may need it, when is the heaviest water downfall and freezing season, why not lay out the job with a laser level to be sure to pitch it where you want it, how much water per hour will determine the gutter and downspout sizes. see also: http://www.buildingscienceconsulting.com/resources /
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Rather than a gutter, you can create a sort of dam above the door on the surface of the roof.
Just get two 8 foot pieces of aluminum angle (you know it has an L shaped profile) AKA angle iron
You can drill and use sheet metal screws to attach it to the top surface of the roof above the door in sort of an inverted V shape to direct the water to either side of the door. Use silicone caulk on the screws when you drive them. This also helps deflect snow slides over the door better than gutters.
If the roof is made of corrigated steel this won't not work because the water will only run striaght down the corrigations and won't be deflected sideways.
I hope you understand it without a picture.
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On Fri 16 May 2008 12:53:06p, pipedown told us...

If the roof is corrugated steel, couldn't you attach the angle shaped aluminum to the bottom side of the roofing edge?
--
Wayne Boatwright
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On May 16, 2:20 pm, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

I did that on my pole barn. I used metal hangers intended to attach to the roof. If you look at the gutter supplies they should be there. I just used a self tapping screw with the rubber washer in each, + a few screws though the roof into the back flange of the gutter just to keep it from swaying, could only do that at the high end though. Here is more or less what I used: http://www.idealtruevalue.com/servlet/the-31351/Detail
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blows inside the barn when the door is open (which is usually is

Call me stupid here, but can you just curl the metal up to make a lip over the door section without damaging the metal? Just make a sort of funnel with the existing roof so rain hits to the sides of the door? Like a really heavy deep socket wrench and work it in parts til you have a 'lip curl' at least 2 inches deep, might need 3?
If that doesnt work for you, and i'm right in asumptions that look isnt all that important, 2 other ideas come to mind.
1- using some sort of rivet to attach, take a flange of metal with a 90 degree bend and high enough for your purposes, and just attach this to the end of the roof as far as you need it to go. Use caulk if the little bits that get past this is a problem. (It wont be as pretty or easy as just curling the metal, but it will work better).
2- Using some old tires cut up, and again a rivet gun, put those up along just like #1 above. The problem is this wont last as well and i suspect in hot weather they will curl back up too strongly for a longer term fix.
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cshenk wrote:

Well you said it stupid!!! This application must take a "special bracket" which is probably available. Google gutters metal roof, or pole barn, no soffit. See what you come up with.
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but you can\'t make them THINK"
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evodawg wrote:

So far, this answer is the closest. I've seen plenty of modern barns with a gutter or eyebrow above the sliding doors. Go to the local supply house that the pole barn builders use, or even back to whoever built your barn, if they are still in business. I'll bet the wholesaler where they get their fittings carries a purpose-built material that will fit the corrugation patterns to attach a short awning and/or gutter to the roof edge or wall above the door. You definitely aren't the only person that ever had this problem. You do also need a sloped apron on the ground in front of the door, sticking out at least a couple of feet. Concrete would be best, but well-drained gravel would also work. If nothing else, some short sections of the same roof panels to extend the roof a couple of feet, tucked under the existing panels far enough the reach the framing, would help a lot. Roof is probably screwed down, so unscrewing the bottom couple of feet should not be a big deal. Slide the panels under, and replace the old screws with slightly longer ones with the built-in gaskets.
-- aem sends...
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On May 16, 2:20pm, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

I cant see it, but screwing the gutter straps to the roof is the normal way.the gutter then hangs under the roof.
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On May 16, 12:20pm, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

Or, you could not install gutters at all and work on the ground drainage: For example:
http://tinyurl.com/5mvkrv
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P.S. When a gutter gets plugged up with leaves and fills up with water it gets HEAAAAAVY. Just something to keep in mind. You got 8.33 lb per gallon of water.
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And how would that help the rain from blowing in his open door?
s
Or, you could not install gutters at all and work on the ground drainage: For example:
http://tinyurl.com/5mvkrv
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It doesn't. But every solution is going to be a less-than-perfect compromise. The OP is going to have to pick out which compromise suits him best. Some rain is going to blow in no matter what you do.
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You could screw the gutter to the roof tin with self drilling sheet metal screws and little 'L' brackets. THEN to support the outer part of the gutter, you'd need some straps like they use on conventional roofs without eaves and facia boards.
Another possible solution would be some rather large "L" brackets fashioned onto the WALL, and then let the gutter actually SIT on the brackets. I suppose they could even be 2x4 wood, depending on how you want things to look. Of course all these options could be painted to match the wall/ roof.
s

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If you decide on the 2x4 approach don't forget to use a pressure treated product. If the aesthetics are too revolting for you, a local siding company who can bend a covering for you. JAT Chuck
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You don't need pressure treated lumber above ground not touching concrete. Just use plain old lumber and paint with exterior paint. Hell, your whole house exterior is not pressure treated is it?
s

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