How to add GFCI to circuit with obsolete breaker box?

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I think this is what happened:
"Multiwire circuits have two or more ungrounded conductors sharing a common neutral, as in a 120/240V, single-phase circuit or a 208Y/120V, 3-phase circuit."
"GFCI receptacles can be used on multiwire circuits, but they must be wired such that the neutral on the load side of the GFCI is not shared by two ungrounded conductors. Failure to observe this requirement will result in a differential current any time a load served by an ungrounded conductor not connected to the GFCI is energized, immediately tripping the GFCI."
From http://ecmweb.com/mag/electric_think_gfci /
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Somthing does not look right for the landscape lights, There is only 1 wire going in and 1 wire going out on a different cable with no neutral tied. Leads me to believe that the neutral comes from a different source, maybe somewhere down the line in a junction box for the landscape lights. In this case you can't use a GFI on the landscape lights because it needs a hot and neutral. Unless you can re-use that "cut" wire as the neutral, then you can use it. But lets work on the pool lights. It looks like the top middle cable is your 110V feed. So connect that to the "Line" neutral and hot side of the GFI.( leave in the black jumper going to the landscape lights) Now connect the white wire of the pool circuit to the "LOAD" neutral terminal. Take the black wire of the pool circuit and connect that to one of the black switch wires of the GFCI/combo switch. Now take the other switch wire of the GFCI combo switch and connect that to the "LOAD" hot terminal. Stupid question , but are these pool/landscape lights low voltage or 110V?
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I would've liked to put GFCIs on both, but it sounds like maybe I can just put a GFCI on the pool light because the landscape light neutral is cut. I'd be tempted to re-use the cut neutral but there's a possibility that this cut wire goes to nowhere. These are 110V landscape lights. Actually they are floodlight bulb receptacles overlooking the stone ground next to the pool. We almost never use them.
It's great news though, that I can use this Leviton combination device for at least the pool light.
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That is a nice drawing - very nice. Where did you pick up your drawing skill?
R
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This is the best/correct hookup because now I can use the outlet regardless whether the switch for the lights is turned on or off.
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iwdplz wrote:

Use a GFCI receptacle as the first device in the circuit. You may also be able to find a GFCI that fits in a single gang box that does not contain a receptacle.
nate
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I simply pulled the old non-gfci circuit that ran to my detached garage out of the panel, then ran a short line to a surface mounted box a few feet from the panel with a gfci outlet. I then pulled the garage line into that so now I have a much needed outlet near my panel and the garage and underground line leading out to it is protected.
Did the same for an old bathroom circuit that was not protected - but in this case I was able to put the gfci outlet in an other area of the basement where there was no outlet so now I have one and the bath is protected.

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