How old is too old for a smoke detector ?

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I have a condo and it has the original smoke detectors, FireX. Probably abo ut 20 years old. they don't take batteries, that's probably why they have n ot received much attention. The are hardwired to AC with a signal wire to t he other 2 detectors. Don't believe they are on a separate circuit, should they be ?
Should they be replaced ?
Recommendations !?
Thanks
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In typed:

Usually, the max recommended life is 10 years. Here's a link that says that in the middle of Page 2 of the document.
http://www.firexsafety.com/NR/rdonlyres/29FF714F-BEE8-468C-A67F-A173FC9DC467/0/110523English.pdf
If you are in a condo, you may want to check with the condo association to find out if your smoke alarms are interconnected with alarms in other units in the building or an outside alarm if they go off.
You may be able to switch them with detectors that also have a battery backup -- not sure.
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I don't think they are interconnected with other units, I have tested years before the and the neighbors have never said anything about it. I know that we don't have any type of notification system with the authorities or a blinker on the outside of the unit.
I was just inquiring about the life of the sensor and/or unit. They are the original equipment.
On Saturday, January 17, 2015 at 4:09:17 PM UTC-6, TomR wrote:

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On Sat, 17 Jan 2015 14:01:23 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

tHAT's what they say.
You could light a fire under one of them and see if the alarm goes off. You wouldn't need a big fire, even a wooden match would do I think even a wooden match that had been extinguished would make enough smoke.
The problem is that you woudn't know if it was as sensitive as it should be. I guess you should have done this when you first moved in, so you'd have a standard to compare with.

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wrote:

Getting direct replacements for your line powered interconnected units may not be as simple as adding battery operated independent units.
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On Saturday, January 17, 2015 at 6:22:11 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote :

ve not received much attention. The are hardwired to AC with a signal wire to the other 2 detectors. Don't believe they are on a separate circuit, sho uld they be ?

I don't see why it would be any problem getting replacements for AC interconnected ones. Standard install is normal AC wiring with one additional wire that runs between units. Independent ones don't provide the same safety. If you have a large house, are a sound sleeper, one going off in the basement at the far end of the house may not be enough to wake you up in the second floor bedroom, etc.
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On 1/17/2015 5:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I'd say if they work they should be OK. It's carbon monoxide detectors that have expiration dates.
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On 1/17/2015 6:36 PM, Frank wrote:

Ionization smoke detetors use a radioactive isotope that has a half life. They are good for about ten years.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
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On 1/17/2015 10:26 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Good point but I never saw an expiration date on my very old detectors and my wife was constantly testing them by not venting the oven enough when broiling.
We replaced all of them last year when she was cooking, an alarm went off and drove us nuts trying to figure where when it turned out to be the CO detector telling us it was dying.
We replaced with more expensive but long battery life detectors maybe good for 10 years before sending at annoying warnings.
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On 1/18/2015 9:14 AM, Frank wrote:

I bought a new smoke detector, and put the old one on a high shelf. Couple months later, the detector chirped. Took me a long time to find the old one (out of sight, battery going weak) as I'd forgot I put it on the shelf.
My Monoxide detector takes batteries three times a year, the two AA cells go dead rapidly. The smokes take 9 volt cell, I try to remember to replace every time I change the clocks. Tempted to get the new lithium cells, good for several years.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 1/18/2015 9:26 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Mine were in first and 2nd floor hallways near stairs and when one would start chirping it took a while to figure which one. Now with these long lasting batteries, I should not hear anything for 10 years.
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On Monday, January 19, 2015 at 8:30:11 AM UTC-5, Frank wrote:

I have that problem too. The chirp is so short and far apart that it can be hard to figure out which one. The part I don't get is these are AC plus battery, yet they start the chirping within about a year. One would think that a battery that's only there for backup would last many years, basically the shelf life minus whatever usage occurs during power outages, which here isn't much. The other part that's a pain is one of them is up high where it can't be reached with a stool or typical small ladder.
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On 1/19/2015 9:18 AM, trader_4 wrote:

I'm at the age where I'll pay an extra buck or two to avoid an annoyance like this. Older folks are more at risk from a fall than from a fire.
Then a lot of devices that need batteries changed every year or so, e.g. a thermostat, are not clearly marked on how to access the battery.
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On 01/17/2015 05:36 PM, Frank wrote:
[snip]

I bought Smoke and CO detectors in 2006. The smoke detector (First Alert with both ionization and photoelectric sensors) has instructions to replace it after 10 years.
AS to the CO detector (NightHawk), it failed and had to be replaced in 2013. The new one has no such message.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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In wrote:

I think if he unplugs one unit and brings it to a Home Depot or Lowes or ACE Hardware etc., they will have compatible units that can be used for replacements -- and probably they will be hardwired units with a battery backup in case of power failure. That's what I did with a 110-volt AC hardwired interconnected alarm system that I have.
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On Saturday, January 17, 2015 at 6:58:31 PM UTC-5, TomR wrote:

Unfortunately, I think code requires that they be battery backed up now. I'd rather just have the AC ones and not have to deal with screwing around every year with changing batteries. Yeah, the battery backup provides a little extra safety, but not worth it to me.
Another curious thing I don't understand. The AC plus battery back up ones I've had experience with, the batteries have to be replaced about once a year, they start beeping. What's up with that? You would think AC would power the thing, with the battery only being called on when the AC goes out. But if that were the case, then the batteries should last a few years. Any idea what's up with that? Any experience?
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I have a condo and it has the original smoke detectors, FireX. Probably about 20 years old. they don't take batteries, that's probably why they have not received much attention. The are hardwired to AC with a signal wire to the other 2 detectors. Don't believe they are on a separate circuit, should they be ?
Should they be replaced ?
Recommendations !?
Thanks
{{
Given the cost we replace and trash (no gifting) @ 5 years.
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Went back to the condo and pushed the test button, Nothing.
Went to Menards and bought 4 new Kidde replacements.
I will try to get them in this weekend. After replacement I will test and check with the neighbors to see if there units alert and post a follow up.
Thanks
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On 1/17/2015 8:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You can ask the fire department, when they arrive.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 1/17/2015 8:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Are the new units also wired to each other? I have to replace mine but I've not checked the plugs on the interconnection yet.
I've not started shopping yet.
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