How not to get stuck in snow

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About 5 years ago I had my parking lot repaved. The paving company intentionally put a shallow slope in the asphalt so that rain and snow melt would run off the parking lot. But, the slope we're talking about is only about 1/8 of an inch per foot; about half of what's required for drain piping.
But, every year I get several tenants knocking on my door and asking for shovels and ice chippers and salt because their cars are stuck in the snow in their parking stall. And, I've finally figured it out.
Tenants won't bother to remove the clumps of ice or hard packed snow that forms behind their wheel wells. As long as the car is in motion, convection removes the heat from the body of the car. But, when they park their cars, the heat from the interior of the car warms the body of the car, and these clumps of ice fall off BEHIND their wheels. So, then, when they want to get out of their parking stalls, those clumps of ice act like wheel blocks to prevent the car from moving, and their wheels just spin and dig holes in the snow.
So, if you live in a climate where snow collects into massive stallagtites behind each of your car's wheels, use a hatchet or something to cut those things off before you park your car. Then, when you next put your car in reverse to pull out of your parking stall, there won't be those blocks of ice behind your wheels to prevent your car from moving.
--
nestork

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On 03/10/2014 03:14 PM, nestork wrote:

Due to a really bad winter I sure had a lot of those snow clumps...but as soon at I move the car or turn the wheel they fall off.
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philo wrote:

Over here we are all on snow tires. That problem does not bother us.
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On 03/10/2014 08:47 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

The answer seems to be front wheel drive.
The alley had turned completely to ice and I had no trouble getting through.
One of my neighbors who has a rear wheel drive could not even back up to get into the alley.
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It's EOD, Engine Over Drive that really makes the difference
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On 03/11/2014 11:30 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My dad bought a Corvair in 1964 and I always freaked my friends out by parking in snow banks etc . That think never got stuck.
Ralph Nadir knew shit about safety, that thing was in two front end accidents and was able to drive away fine and no one inside got injured.
It was slightly light in front...so my dad just put a bucket of sand up there.
The last time I got stuck in snow was when my company car was a 1982 Chevy.
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On 3/11/2014 3:00 PM, philo wrote:

Screw Nadar.
I had a '62 Corvair Monza coupe with snow tires. I drove a few people home from work in a snowstorm and passed a Jeep on a hill. Loved that car. I was broadsided by an 18 wheeler and has a couple of scratches, but lost the car.
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Having owned a string of Corvairs, I agree they were good in the snow. But about 6 or 7 inches of unplowed snow could stop them cold.
The entire underside of the car was flat. Get the car up on that and it's not moving anywhere.
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

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On 03/11/2014 02:51 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I still recall the time when I was in the Army I had to drive a Lieutenant to the top of a mountain in a 1/4 ton truck.
As we got higher up the thing kept stalling due to the increased elevation and we never did make it to the top...but there were some kids up their in Corvair.
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On 3/13/2014 5:33 AM, philo wrote:

I'd never heard the good side of Corvair autos. Sounds like they had some real advantages. If it doesn't move, paint it green.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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philo wrote:

I guess living in cold Alberta we're well prepared for cold weather driving. All vehicles in my family are AWD type(Acura, Subaru) with good winter tires. This winter is like coldest in 20 years. More than usual snow and cold temp. Wife and kids park in the garage, I am left outside in the back yard parked inside a potable car port. I programmed my remote starter when temp. drops below -25C, it starts and runs 5 mins. Also my remote fob can check batttery condition(voltage) and engine bay temp. So far haven't got stuck this winter, LOL!
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When I had RWD cars I always put 3 100lb bags of sand in the trunk over the axle in late fall. I NEVER got stuck. My Ford F-100 got 5 bags. Sand is cheap, but there's a MPG penalty. With FWD cars I try to not let the gas tank get below 1/2 tank to minimize fishtailing. When there's a foot of unplowed snow on the road, you best stay home. FWD is much better in snow.
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On 03/12/2014 05:25 AM, Vic Smith wrote:

I recall the time I had to use a pickup truck from work during a snowstorm.
My boss placed a 1000# weight right behind the cab.
An empty pick up truck would me my absolute last choice to use in a snow storm but a loaded one was possibly even better than a jeep.
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Per philo :

Same here, but I would venture that the 1,000 pound weight would kill you dead in a minor crash.
The guy who designed the cargo net I used on my Suburban got is inspiration when a photographer friend was killed by a camera stowed in the trunk of his car. Not that bad a crash, rear seat back flipped down, camera came forward and hit the guy in the back of the head.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 03/13/2014 08:25 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Maybe my boss wanted it that way.
Anyway I'm still alive but he is no longer alive.
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Nestork,
Why don't you back into the parking space?
Dave M.
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On Mon, 10 Mar 2014 15:58:28 -0700, David L. Martel

Hear, hear.
I also back into my garage. Why? the thinking is that when I come home, I can take my time to carefully put the car away. And who knows, what kind of emergency may require me to drive out fast, when I don't have that time. One time after a severe accident to one foot; I had to drive myself to the hospital. I really, really was glad I only had to drive the car 'forward' to get there. Even more glad it was an automatic.
Now, where I live ALL the neighbors now back into their garages. HA!
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I have been backing into parking spots for about as long as I have been driving. There are a number of reasons, one of which no longer applies.
The main reason is that I hate trying to back out of a parking spot in a busy parking lot. Pulling out of the spot is so much easier because you can see the traffic in the lanes and you can make eye contact with the other drivers. It's quick and easy. The offset is the need to back in which is only an issue if the driver behind you is either an a-hole or doesn't realize that you pulled past the spot so that you can back in. The quicker you are at pulling forward and putting the vehicle in reverse, the better. Using your turn signal is also important, assuming the driver behind you is somewhat intelligent. Of course, the best case is a pull through spot. I'm always amazed at the drivers that have a pull through spot available, yet leave their vehicle in the "back" spot which will require them the back out if someone parks in front of them. How hard is it to think ahead and take the front spot so you can pull right out?
The other reason I've always backed in is based on an old bad habit. When I was young and stupid my brain would tell me to back in while sober so I wouldn't have to back out when I was drunk. It was a safety issue. ;-) My drinking days are behind me so that's no longer an issue.
I also think that one of the reasons I don't mind backing in is because I don't mind driving in reverse. I'll back up "long" distances every now and then just to stay in practice. I've driven in reverse around entire blocks on occasion. I'll admit that I'm not as adapt at high speed reverse driving as when I was younger, but I can still back a vehicle into (and through) some pretty tight areas regardless of whether or not multiple turns are required. Some drivers are just not very skilled at driving in reverse and I feel it's because they never purposely practice.
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wrote:

The trick is to ALWAYS look in reverse, never change back to looking front while driving backwards. And, sometimes moving your hand to the inside at the bottom of the wheel helps [or such], but I think that type crutch will ultimately mislead the brain and is fraught with peril.
No matter how you cut it, driving backwards is ultimately unstable. Rear wheel steering just is not good. Like trying to land a 'tail dragger' airplane, all is well until you're below 'flying' speed and then watch out.
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