How much water in a copper tube?

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Like you, I am to lazy to look it up, but 1/4" will not provide much volume of water. Use 1/2" or 3/4" so you dont have to wait 1/2 hour to fill your sink. And since you are going overhead you can insulate the pipe at the same time. You may experience water hammer with the 1/4" also.
wrote:

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Good point Eddy. I think I will just buy a coil of 1/2 inch flexible copper and run that from the tankless water heater to the kitchen sink. The dishwasher gets its water from the kitchen faucet tap. Harry
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1/2". 1/4" is too small, and anything bigger is un-necessary. How much output can the heater keep up with, anyway?
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8 gallons per minute of 150 degree hot water. It will sit on the outside wall of my bathrooms. Since it is outside - no stack is necessary. Just water in - water out - 110 volt to run the computer and igniter. When no water is being drawn - no fuel is being spent. Harry
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this thread is sad.... thank the american public education system.
randy
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it was really more about laziness than education. the american way ?? :) bill

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laziness?
it looks more about wrongness, cant solve it without excellness, argue over 1/1000 of an inch of pipe inner diameter and avoid the question entirelyness, and just plain silliness.
personally, if i didnt want to do the SIMPLE math, i would have filled 6" of pipe with water, stuck my finger over one end, and drained it into a measuring cup. as for what to do once you have this measurement, ill leave as a question for all to ponder....
randy

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Hi Tom - If you believe that education creates better people - and you believe that America is the best country in the world to live in - then you must therefore believe that our education system made our country better. My view point - I was a public school teacher for 33 years in the backwoods of PA. I have seen many great teachers there come and go. I feel our students do very well for themselves. Our system is not perfect and we are constantly trying to improve it. If you would spend a few years in our system - you would come out with nothing but admiration. Lots of people try to be teachers - and leave after a couple years burned out. I am no idea what you do for a living - but I am sure it is not as easy a target as public schools - everyone that goes through a school as a student thinks they are an expert on education. :-) Harry
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On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 11:52:30 -0500, Harry Everhart

I love our public school system!
Because it teaches children that school is a 100% education, I only have to compete with foreigners for my computer consulting positions. Only they are willing to self-learn nonschool taught programming languages, and since I can speak/read/write english(bad at times) and they don't, I get to name my own price.
Go America!
tom
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I would run PEX homeruns to each fixture, no joints buried in walls. PEX with sharkbites in easy to work with, far cheaper than copper and no one will steal it from your home. If it freezes it will be undamaged when thawed.....
the electric tankless sound like a good idea, but have major disadvantages.
I would run PEX with recurcliating lines, insulate with expanding foam, and keep the existing tanks...
even if you install tankless keep the existing tanks for easy reconversion
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On Tuesday, March 15, 2005 2:05:04 PM UTC-4, Harry Everhart wrote:

It would be intersting to see how this project worked out for the OP, did he love it or hate it? has the now 9 year old tankless failed? questions like this....
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100' of 1/2" copper holds 4.07 gallons.
$ printf '%f\n' $(( (3.1415926 * (.5 * .5) * (100 * 12)) / 231 )) 4.079990
FWIW
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snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

It's length * pi r^2, not d^2. 1.02 gal.
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Is the above "1/2" diameter the internal or external diameter of the tube? I would think it's the internal diameter so the radius should be less than 0.25".
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You're right, it is internal diameter. Or at least close to it. 1/2" nominal copper has an OD of 0.625". Type K has a wall thickness of 0.049", and type L has a wall thickness of 0.040". The ID is either 0.527" or 0.545". So it's either 1.13 or 1.21 gal.
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