How much to remove heating oil?

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On Thu, 24 Nov 2011 18:52:44 -0500, "Robert Green"

And PERHAPS knowing she was talking to the gas company they figured they'd get the job of replacing the boiler with another oil-fired one if it was going to cost an extra $1100 to switch to gas- - - - - .
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<stuff snipped>

the
I don't believe they knew she was thinking of switching but it does sound like they were trying to "get their foot in the door" for any heating remodelling. A heating oil company's version of an "anchor baby."
No matter what their motives, they clearly did things in the wrong order. Inspect BEFORE you pump in a full tank, not afterwards. I wonder if the "other company" they had to call to pull the oil out wasn't a wholly-owned subsidiary. I would have been fuming if I had been charged not only for the oil, but its removal because I am sure I could have found someone to pump it out for free and perhaps for a little added cash.
I can't believe they just "dumped" the oil they retrieved from her, either. I am sure they tried not only billing her $1142 for the fill and removal, but sold what they pulled from her tank to some other customer without telling them it was used oil. Who would know? What a deal. Making over $1500 on one tank.
-- Bobby G.
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On Fri, 25 Nov 2011 05:59:53 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

I heartilly dissagree. They've been servicing that furnace and told her last year it was on it's last legs. She called for an inspection. She did NOT have an auto-fill contract and did not ask for a fill. If it was two different companies, the oil company would not have known the service company was checking out a "bad" furnace - but it was one company. Most likely one receptionist, and one dispatcher.

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On Nov 25, 4:21 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Agreed that she did not have an auto-fill contract. But in the case it was disputed whether or not she asked for it to be filled. The company says she did, she claims she did not.
She was told her furnace probably had one or two years life left earlier that year. She got a quote from another company to convert to gas as a result. So then in Oct, start of the heating season, she calls for routine service. Sure sounds possible to me that having decided she wasn't going to install the new gas system, she decided to go with the old one for another season. So, she called for routine cleaning/service and certainly might have also asked for the tank to be filled.

You expect the receptionist and dispatcher to know that it was a "bad" furnace? She was NOT calling for service on a furnace that was not working. She called for routine service.
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On Fri, 25 Nov 2011 00:49:18 -0500, "Robert Green"

Agreed.

Me neither.

While it's always conceivalbe that a customer puts crap in the oil, the odds of it are really low, and at the least they could sell the oil at a bargain pirce to the owner or someone in his family who has an oil furnace. Or to an employee. After all, in the slim chance it hurts that furnace, they can have their own company fix the furnace, and it would be a true business expense.

That's possible too. They coul deliver it to someone they knew would call them if he had furnace problems, maybe someone with an old furnace, so he wouldn't blame the oil but his furnace.
. What a deal. Making over

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On Sat, 26 Nov 2011 06:18:00 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

We have a company come to take our waste oil. It has to be handles by a licensed company by state law and you need DEP permits, etc. They charge us 10¢ a gallon for our old hydraulic oil. They pump it into the single tank on the truck. It mixes with used motor oil, contaminated oil, and anything else they suck up during the day.
I'm not sure what they do with it, but I know of one outfit that filters it and burns it for heating a kiln in cement making plant.
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I can see how she won, because the oil company could not show that she had called for oil. However, I think it's likely she did call. Let's look at the facts:
She is told in May that her old boiler may only last another year or two.
She gets a quote from another company to install a new gas boiler.
She calls in Oct for routine service on the old oil boiler.
Given that sequence, it seems likely to me that she had seen the price of a new gas system and decided against it. Otherwise she would not have called for service on the old one. And having decided to continue with the existing one, it's not unreasonable to think that she could have asked for the oil to be filled at the same time. Or that they asked during that call if she needed it filled and she said yes, not thinking that it could be filled and then the boiler is found to be shot so soon after being last inspected in May.
But since the oil company can't produce a witness who remembers what happened, they lose.
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On Thu, 24 Nov 2011 18:52:44 -0500, "Robert Green"

The ohter possibility is that your psychic!
At the very least you're well orgnaized, to find this now. ;)

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wrote:

Of course they could have sold it to a neighbor, just shut off the valve on the tank, remove the pipe, attach a short piece of pipe, and move 5 gallons at a time in 5gal gas cans. It's a pain in the ass, but I'd do that before paying $538 for removal. Sell it to the neighbor for $350 or $400, help transport it and be done with it.
But if it was filled without authorization, I'd consider that a gift.... A good judge should do the same.....
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<stuff snipped>

It was both filled AND removed without authorization and then a lien put against the house for $1142 for pumping in, pumping out AND the cost of the oil. The judge made the oil company eat the entire fee.
-- Bobby G.
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On Thu, 24 Nov 2011 18:57:19 -0500, "Robert Green"

As they should have. Automatic fill usually required a contract and often monthly budget payments. I did that for a number of years with my old oil company until they screwed me.
I had a contract for 850 gallons at a fixed price that was in effect until May 15. During the winter, they delivered about 750 gallons, leaving another hundred come May. The bastards filled my tank on May 16 and charged full price, not the contracted price for the 100 gallons left on the contract that expired the day before.
It was legal, but I think unethical. After two phone calls and a letter, they settled for the contracted price on the 100 gallons. It was the last oil they ever sold me.
I've since installed a new, more efficient boiler and use about 450 gallons a year now.
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wrote:

the
Gawd. Are they really heating oil companies or professional "butt fu&ers?" Maybe it's that constant sticking of hoses in holes that turns them to the Dark Side. They're always out to stick it to someone.

Vendors don't seem to understand that by squeezing a customer they risk losing them for life - and losing referrals, too. There are a number of companies I'll never deal with again like Citibank. Fool me once, shame on you, as the saying goes. My boss used to tell the story of how his dad, the patriarch of a large clan of Irishmen, got screwed by a Ford dealer once for undercoating he did not request and did not want. No one person in that whole, huge extended family ever bought a Ford as a result for something like 40 years afterwards.
-- Bobby G.
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On Fri, 25 Nov 2011 00:58:52 -0500, "Robert Green"

No, they bought GMs from the GM dealer owned by the same family in the next town??
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On Wed, 23 Nov 2011 22:03:04 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

"The law abhors a forfeiture", is a general rule, although I don't know if it applies here.
Bobby G is right too.
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<stuff snipped>

In this case, it depended on the sequence of events. Had they not removed the oil, I think the judge might have ruled she could keep it, but as you say, some jurists might feel that's a harsh penalty. But perhaps not if she had nowhere to sell it or no way to remove it. Then she could claim they stuck her with something she could not use and that would cost a great deal of money to remove and dispose of legally. I can't believe that oil was just dumped. Much more likely it got sold to someone else.
What's the downside? How could the new recipient prove it was "bad oil?" There are a lot of suppositions outside of the actual facts. In this case, it seemed pretty clear the boiler was on its last legs and that inspection should have come before filling, especially since she didn't ASK for filling.
-- Bobby G.
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Obviously you've never seen what comes out of a 40 year old tank when you pump it all out.

Clairvoyant? She CLAIMS she didn't call for filling. The oil company CLAIMS she did. Don't you think it's a bit curious that she never claimed they delivered oil without her calling for it before? That this one time the oil gets delivered somehow without her asking for it?
Sequence of events:
Boiler is serviced in Spring and she is told it probably has 1 or 2 years of life left.
She calls another company and gets a quote on a new gas system.
Oct she calls for routine service at the start of the heating season. Company claims she also asked for the tank to be filled, she says she did not.
Given that scenario it looks like she saw the price of a new system, decided against it. So, getting ready for the new season she called for routine service, ie cleaning, new nozzle, etc. and to have the tank filled, without thinking that it might have suddenly gone kaput.
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