How much heat is lost in a steaming hot shower anyway?

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On 12/31/2015 8:40 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I suspect not so much. If he was that abusive/controlling, he'd turn off the water to the shower WHILE they were in it ("Showers will be limited to 5.0379 minutes")
Rather, the "offenders" have found a spot of relative bliss amidst an environment that they have acknowledged as "too cold". Make the showers less comfortable and maybe they start showering *less* (i.e., SMELLING more!)
I think the real solution is getting everyone on the same page and sorting out how to come to a solution that fits ALL needs AND other constraints (budget, etc.). There may be other solutions that are amenable to all parties?
Perhaps they aren't anxious to step OUT of the warm shower into a FREEZING bathroom? So, an overhead heat lamp could make the transition less intimidating.
Or, raising the temperature in the house at certain "living" times during the day in exchange for lowering it at others.
Or, adding more layers of clothing; exploiting southern exposure when choosing where to sit/work/play during the daylight hours; etc.
First step is understanding the problem(s) -- on both sides!
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On 12/31/2015 3:35 PM, Don Y wrote:

There is only one side to understand. Anyone keeping the house at 55 with a wife and child is an inconsiderate abusive prick.
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On 12/31/2015 2:58 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

What if the only other option is sleeping under a bridge?? Would that be a better option for all involved?
I had a neighbor who was always burning her fireplace. The smoke was really irritating to me (allergies, etc.). I commented to another neighbor, one day, his reply: she has no *heat* in the house; wood is relatively easy to come by but the gas company wants cash money!
I'm just a little less willing to jump to conclusions without knowing the entire story. E.g., if he wanted to be truly abusive, he could limit their showers, turn off the hot water (except when HE wanted it), etc.
The fact that he's looking at increasing the house temperature +5F as a means of mitigating the (apparent) "need" for those long showers suggests he's trying to be reasonable (at least, in HIS mind).
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On 12/31/2015 5:21 PM, Don Y wrote:

It may be he is just pulling our collective leg too. There is heating assistance available too.

That just means he is irrational, but still a prick.
I do know a guy that keeps his house at 55-60, but he lives alone and is rarely in the house aside from sleeping.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I still have a bit of suspicion OP could be a troll.
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On 12/31/2015 4:58 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Way to start the new year! Big load of common sense.
All usenet posters should be this observant. Good job!
(But, on the flip side, 55F cuts down on spoiled chicken the next day. And, 55, it's not just a good idea, it's the law. Thermostat cops will see you before you see them.)
--
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On Thu, 31 Dec 2015 00:06:21 -0000 (UTC), Vlad Lescovitz
55 feels nice when you're outside, even without much sunlight, but somehow anything short of 66 or 68 feels cold inside.

It might be. Or she could take a shower in a bathtub with a closed drain. For one thing you could see how many gallons it really is (because it might be less than 50, since cold water mixes with the hot water in the WH and the mixture is probably too cold to shower with before the entire 50 gallons are used.)
Then when she got out, all the heat in the water in the tub woudl eventually be released into the house. When the water was cold, you could drain it out. (This allows more dirt to settle out of the water onto the tub, but if your wife is pretty clean, that might not be much. )
More importantly, it puts more humidity into the house that will make it feel 4, 6, maybe 8 degrees warmer (let me know). When my furnace has been broken, or when the LL gave no heat, I boil water on the stove. A big pot that will hold a basketball takes 3 or 4 hours to evaporate, and has a greater warming effect, and one that fills the whole house, than just running the stove burner without the pot of water does, and more than a room heater does, certainly in the same length of time but in more time too.
Everytime I say this, people here talk about damage from water running down the inside of the windows, but water like that almost never happens and no damage has happened, and in my case it woudl be easy to paint the window sills. But mostly insulated windows are not that cold.
I usually take a bath every day, and when I'm thinking about it, the amount of now-warm water going down the drain bothers me.
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wrote:

I've always preferred baths over showers. I always let the bath water in the tub (during the heating season), until it's cold. Then I drain it. If I leave the bathroom door shut with a tub full of hot water, the bathroom is 10 to 20 deg warmer than the rest of the house.
I notice my furnace running less often too when there is hot water in the tub. That hot water acts like a radiator. Why let it go down the drain?

It might take a few seconds more, and an extra squirt of tub cleaner, to clean the tub. No biggie!!! That saved heat is more valuable!
By the way, if you have some wet and slightly dirty gloves or socks from shoveling snow, I toss them in the tub after I finish bathing, swish them around, wring them with my hands and place them above a heat register to dry. You dont need to waste energy to run a washing machine and dryer just for some gloves/socks, and the gloves/socks by the register or radiator add some humidity to the house too.

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On Thu, 31 Dec 2015 01:13:40 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

The only reason is the dirt that settles out. Oh, and once I left the tub water dripping and it almost overflowed the tub!

I'm still using the bathtub brush my mother bought from me when I was a Fuller Brush Man, in 1964. It's like a toilet bowl brush, with twisted wire holding the bristles, just in a different shape. Triangular, instead of round. Most of the bristles that face out have been smashed down and run sideways now, but I tried to twist the hole wire so the interior bristles would face out again, the wire was too tough to do it the way I tried. Maybe I'll use a vice.
But tonilght because of this thread, I thought I'd look for a replacement brush. If the first one lasted 51 years, I'll have to live to 120 to get 51 years out of the second one. But they don't seem to sell one like the one I have, anymore. Darn. They have long handles, like mops, or other differences.

Good idea.
I put a diverter in my dryer output, so that I send the hot air outside during the summer and inside during the winter.
Of course the dryer is broken now and I've been drying all my laundry on the shower bar. I've been avoiding washing towels, because they'll drip all the way upstairs.
Not about wetness, but when I was little, my mother would take my coat out of the closet, which was surprisingly cold, and put it over the hot air vent so it would be warm when I went to school.

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On 12/31/2015 4:43 AM, Micky wrote:

If they come out still dripping, you washer is not performing well. They should be wet, but not so much as to drip after spinning.

As paintedcow says, leave the water until it is cooled to extract the heat. Good idea.
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Maybe they don't drip; I"m not sure. I thought they were just wet when horizontal but if any part hung down, the water collected and it dripped. (I had a hard time tightening the belt enough to make it start spinning without my help, and I think I need a new belt. It's 36 years old too.)
I'm also afraid to hang too much weight on the shower rod, one wet towel seems like the maximum.

Okay.
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wrote:

So you got one of those idiot tubs without an overflow. I replaced a tub for that reason. Of course you shouldn't let the water drip either. But tubs and sinks without overflows are assinine.
I wish toilets had some sort of overflow drains too, so when they plug, they would not run all over the floor....
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On Thu, 31 Dec 2015 16:07:32 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

It has an overflow, but I've found that neither sink nor tub overflows handle as much water as comes in.
I think I took the whole thing apart once -- remove the two screws adn pull the wire and the bottomless bucket out from the wall -- and there nothing clogged about it. Perhaps the area where the water leaves the tub is not big enough.
Same problem with a sink.

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On 12/30/2015 6:06 PM, Vlad Lescovitz wrote:

How poor are you that you can only afford to keep your house at 55 F? There's no way in hell I'd subject my family to that unless financially I had no choice - and I'm a tightass.
I keep our house at 58 F at night, 62 F during the day - but I allow an override up to 65 F if anyone's at home.
If you're not doing this out of financial desperation, then your family is entitled to do whatever the hell they need to do to beat you at your skinflint game.
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On Thursday, December 31, 2015 at 8:11:46 AM UTC-5, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

You *allow* an override?
How gracious of you!

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On 12/31/2015 8:45 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

It's my house, and I'm the one that pays the bills, so unless they want to provide money for the energy bill, it's my call. That's how I was raised and it always made perfect sense to me. It's reasonably comfortable as long as you're dressed for winter, not summer, meaning long pants, socks, and sweaters or sweatshirts. If you're sitting still, grab a lap blanket.
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On 12/31/2015 10:40 AM, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

Does your wife clean the house, do the dishes, cook your meals, wash your clothes, or anything else I've not listed? Do you pay her compensation for all the jobs that she does as a housekeeper, nanny, psychologist, companion?
I've heard that sort of argument before and to me it's just a selfish and disrespectful mindset that never takes into consideration the value of anything that wife does in the home.
--
Maggie

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On 12/31/2015 10:54 AM, Muggles wrote:

No wife. I do most everything myself, though my elderly mom sometimes cooks or washes out of sheer boredom - something I don't want her to do for safety's sake.

I agree. If I had a wife, her labor would be her contribution. Otherwise, if you're staying with me because you're a relative in dire financial straits, well - you are welcome to stay till you get back on your feet. That's what family should do. It's my house, so I'll do the upkeep. You spend your time looking for work, or working to earn money. If you're feeling cold, *you* decide if you want to turn over some of your money towards the energy bill, or if you'd rather put it towards your savings goal toward getting a place of your own. But if I'm willing to live colder than I'd prefer in order to save my money for better things, it won't hurt you to do the same, as long as you're living with (off) me.
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On 12/31/2015 11:48 AM, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

No wife, no harm then! Doesn't your mom get cold?

That makes MUCH more sense to me. You can't make it too comfy or they'll never want to get back on their own.

Now, that's something I totally agree with!
--
Maggie

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On 12/31/2015 7:11 AM, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

We keep the house between 68° and 72°, although it will fluctuate if we get colder spells and go lower than 68°. For a long time the house was always on the cold side, but this fall I bought 2 portable rolling oil radiator heaters that are wonderful at keeping the house warm. They cycle between high/med/low/off power settings and maintain a surrounding temp based on the thermostat temp that you set it at. When it cycles to off it's still producing heat because the coils are radiating heat from the warmed coils.
They work so well that we have to turn the thermostat down. They are slow to heat up a room, but once they get up to temperature we never get cold. We've tried all sorts of portable space heaters to supplement the gas furnaces and baseboard heaters throughout the house which never really kept us warm, but these 2 oil radiator heaters weren't very expensive at all and they do the job of all the other portable heaters couldn't do.
--
Maggie

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