How much force to tip over a tree

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wrote:

A strong wind that would create an equally loaded force can uproot a pine. Pines do have a weaker root system than most trees but putting a winch at one point on the tree will not uproot the pine. It will only snap the trunk and cause your winch to fly back at you.
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On Mon, 23 Oct 2006 20:55:14 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Don't pines typically snap, rather than uproot in strong winds? I hope so. I have some big muthas too damn close to the house. <G>
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No. If they are in the open and see the full brunt of the wind they will actually partially pull out of the ground because of the weak root system. I have had two pines on different occasions pull down to a 45 degree angle. I had to remove them. My neighbor has three pines right now that have a 20 degree tilt at the base but have grown to re-righted the top half of the trunk through the years.
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It depends in where they're growing, how long it's been raining, and whether you've recently changed their wind exposure. A pine tree that's grown in the middle of a pine forest and has spend all it's energy lunging for the sky in order to beat it's brethren to the sunlight will blow over in the next big storm if you cut down all the trees around it. A pine tree that's grown up in the middle of a field because it's too close to the pigsty to mow isn't going anywhere.
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Bob F wrote:

Wow, lively topic, eh? I like the idea, it's creative, and anything that avoids having to dig out the damn stump by hand is worth considering. I would advise against it though. Winching it over will create a situation with a lot of potential energy in your system. It is inherently dangerous. The tree could snap, rope snap, whatever you have the rope tied to move, etc. As someone said, if it was practical and safe the pros would do it that way. Many trees blow over in storms taking the roots up, but the wind force is distributed over the whole tree, whereas you would be applying the force in only one spot, making breakage more likely, I think.
I have cut down several trees in the yard (mostly dead elms) of this size or bigger and never had any trouble dropping them in the direction I wanted. A combination of how you do the cut (notch on the side you want it to fall toward, and felling cut from other side) and having a helper pull on a rope attached way up in the tree seems to do it. Yes once the rope is slack your guidance is over but once you get it started in the right direction, my experience has been it keeps going that way. When felling leave a hinge of uncut wood and try to pull it over with the rope. If the tree is leaning or lopsided though you might have more trouble getting it to go where you want.
The stump can be removed by digging around it, chopping exposed roots with an axe, more digging, more chopping, etc. Not fun but it will work eventually.
OK, you want a more fun way. Here is my suggestion - don't use any tools. Push on the trunk, the tree will sway a little and come back. Push rythmically in time with the sway to make it sway more and more until it falls over.
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maybe).
LOL. I think the tree is a little big for that to work.
Bob
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Heathcliff wrote:

They can also be burned out too. Especially pines. For that matter, the roots will burn out underground too...I burned out an old dead pine stump a few years ago and the roots burned underground for close to a week (a heavy rain put them out).
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Don't do this near any coal veins that are close to the the surface.
http://www.easternpa.com/pottsville/hist.html
http://www.dep.state.pa.us/dep/DEPUTATE/MINRES/BAMR/CENTBRF.htm
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Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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On Wed, 25 Oct 2006 00:55:11 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote:

It doesn't have to be coal seams. Deep loam can be nearly as bad. Although easier to get at, once you figure out that you've set the planet on fire.
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One huge fart should do it.
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Incidentally, I found this on a Warn winch site.
Pull out shrubs or pull down trees.Use
the choker chain low around the shrub,
then start pulling with the winch.The
choker chain will tighten. Small shrubs can
be pulled out by the roots.
On a larger tree, you can attach the
choker chain high up on the trunk for
leverage, then start pulling.The winch will
pull the tree over and expose roots that
could take hours to dig out. Slack the
tension on the wire rope and cut the tree
roots so the tree can be pulled loose.Use of
a snatch block to change the angle of the
pull to you to position the vehicle out of
the way should the tree fall.
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