How much for 1.5 cubic yard of concrete

Hi: I know there is a big difference in prices to get a concrete pad poured from location to location in the country BUT. I want to get a 10x20 concrete pad poured in my backyard. I'll do the forms and prep work, so just looking at the price for a truck to come out and pour the stuff. Has anyone had this done recently? I'm just looking for a ballpark $ amount to see if I can afford it.
Thanks TB
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plant(s). There is usually an additional charge for a Saturday so be sure to tell them when you want it. Give them a call and ask.
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wrote:

$30, but you gotta pick it up at my place.
Okay, get real. There's a reason you have a phone book. Call the concrete suppliers, you'll have an answer in a few minutes. They may ask slump and PSI, just tell them you're doing a patio and ask what they recommend. If you don't have access for the delivery, you'll need a pump as well, or guys with wheelbarrows and possibly an overtime charge.
By the way, that yard and a half is almost exactly a 4" 10x20 slab, you may want to overestimate in case you miss a little on measurements.
Jeff
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<< How much for 1.5 cubic yard of concrete >>
Don't even think about pouring a 200 square foot pad with only 1.5 yards on concrete. If my arithmetic is near correct you will need just under 6 yards so figure 300-400 bucks depending on area. Hire a crew to do the finishing unless you like to suffer. We get pros that like to pick up some weekend cash on finish jobs like this, for a hundred and a half and a six pack when its done. Set your screeds square plumb and level, get you pea gravel in place and tamped down, get your mesh or rebar and 4 mil poly and you're set to go. Bottom line maybe $700-800 and your mileage may vary. Good luck.
Joe
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You are not even close !!!!! One yard will do a 9ft. X 9ft. square. Take a 3ft cube, slice it in 4 inch layers and you get NINE square yards (or a 9ft. X 9ft area). Which is 81 square feet. A 10 X 20 floor is 200 square feet. Two yards would be a 162 sq. ft. another half yard is about 40 sq. ft. 162 + 40 = 202 sq. ft. SO, You need 2.5 yards. The original figure of 1.5 was incorrect and so is the "just under 6 yards" (assuming a 4 inch pour). It's always best to get a little extra. Order 2.75 or 3 yards to be safe.
I always tend to make a little form somewhere. Like a pad where your garbage cans sit, or something like that. That way, there is a place to get rid of any excess, and put it to use. If you dont have enough left over, you can always remove that spare form and fill with dirt again.
The other option is to order the exact amount, then have some bags of ready mix handy in case you run short
As for price, I was just quoted $70 per yard delivered (more on weekends). So, figure about $200. Depends on where you live though.
As for the suffering...... I dont understand that..... If it was a 30 X 50 foot area, maybe..... But a 10 X 20...... NOT !!!!
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On 06 Aug 2003 03:19:37 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comtosspam (Joe Bobst) wrote:

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<< If my arithmetic is near correct you will need just under 6 yards so >>
Well, duh!! Bad arithmetic, and sincere apologies. I knew when I pushed the send button that something didn't look right. Maybe this is closer: 10' x 20' = 200 sq ft. Divided by 3 for a 4" fill = 66.7 cu ft. Then divided by 27 (not 9, dummy) comes out to about 2.5 cu yds. On the practical side, it pays to check the grade of concrete available in relation to your climate and terrain. The top choices are lighter colored and survive the rigors of frost and weather much better for not much additional cost. From what I've seen, the better stuff is easier to finish, too. Have fun on the project.
Joe
Joe
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Tim Bondy wrote:

trucked out concrete... just like the labor the material will cost different in new york and cal. than in other small towns.......... and you better have some help with you to handle the concrete.. because these guys on the truck want to pump and run.. they loose money when they have to wait for you to work the cement... and have a few wheel barrors handy to move the concrete and hold some cement when the truck leaves so you will have enough to finish the job and patch it up... cause once he is gone you never gonna get the correct mix to patch it up later.... have a roll of visquine(plastic) handy in case it rains like it did when i did mine....the rain came and the freshly pour had to be covered to keep the dollar sized marks from forming.........
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Thanks for all the advice. I have a lot to learn when it comes to pouring a pad for a BBQ pit. As far as the amount of concrete I need, I got the 1.5 cubic yards info from 2 different sites on the internet. As usual, believe only half of what you read and never trust the other half :-)
Time to go to the library, talk some friends into a weekend of fun, and I won't forget to keep an eye on the weather forecast.
TB
Again, thanks to all the replies...

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TB,
Use this website ( http://www.concrete.com/calculatorsmaterials.htm#volume ) to determine your actual need - thickness is the variable you did not mention... Then call some suppliers and get a quote - make sure that if you are pouring in your back yard you don't drive the cement truck (VERY heavy) over things like your leaching field, septic tank, buried gas pipe, etc... get a boom truck delivery to avert such problems...
God luck,
Kevin O'

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