How much does it cost to change 15amp circuit to 20 amp

Page 2 of 4  

wrote:

It is probably unsafe, but not necessarily. They could have put a 20a plug on a device that draws 3a. Unsafe? Maybe. Illegal? Sure.
It is hard to believe that a treadmill take more power than my table saw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
People do all sorts of Rube Goldberg things, but in the electrical field, if the proper standards are followed, second guessing shouldn't be a factor. If the manufacturer installs a 20 amp plug on a device, it should draw more than 12 amps and no more than 16 at full load
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That is so not true. It is called cover your ass. I have 3 kitchen appliances that have digital clocks. The instructions say to unplug the appliance when not in use.
Why would you put a digital clock on a device that you only plug up for an hour a day?
On Wed, 6 Dec 2006 21:24:48 -0500, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No, actually its called National Electric Code, and Underwriters Laboratories
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terry wrote:

Think how much power you save by unplugging clocks when not in use.
It's for the children.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RBM wrote:

A few code cycles back there were several proposals to modify 210.21-B-2 (probably, but not imortant). One agrument was that some UL listed devices, like hair dryers, with current draw of 12-15A can have 15A plugs. I would guess that 20A non-continuous loads can have 20A plug. (The codemaking panel response was 'we're right, UL is wrong'.) (It would be nice if UL standards were on-line.)
-- bud--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No, it IS unsafe, period -- because it enables plugging in a 20A load on a circuit that cannot safely carry 20A. Maybe the load the OP is going to plug into it today only draws 3A -- but you can't predict what might be plugged in there tomorrow, or next week, or next year. It absolutely is unsafe to attach a 20A receptacle to a 15A circuit. There is a REASON why 20A plugs and receptacles exist: to keep them from being plugged in on 15A circuits.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 07 Dec 2006 02:28:50 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

State your source.
It is 100% legal to use a 20A receptacle on a 15A breaker. If you plug in a appliance that draws more than 15A then the circuit is protected by the 15A breaker. (That is what it is there for)
It won't work if you try it, but that doesn't make it unsafe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
NEC , table 210.21 (B) (3) shows you can't install a 20 amp outlet on a 15 amp circuit
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't have my code book handy, but you sound sure.
Thanks
On Wed, 6 Dec 2006 22:28:49 -0500, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can access an online code book at : http://nfpa-acs-01.gvpi.net:8080/rrserver/browser?title=/NFPASTD/7005SB
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks! I didn't know that existed; mine is getting kinda old.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I found this at Pass and Seymour's site that confirms what you say.
http://www.passandseymour.com/knowhowfaq/showquestions.cfm?faqcategory=Electrical%20Basics
On Wed, 6 Dec 2006 22:28:49 -0500, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
in on 15A circuits.

False. Source: National Electrical Code, Table 210.21(B)(3) states maximum receptacle on a 15A circuit is "not over 15A".

IF the breaker operates properly...

Please refrain from giving electrical safety advice. You're clearly unqualified to do so.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Except for my table saw I don't think I have even seen anything that required 20a. Chances of a problem are remote. Especially since a) it would only be a small overload; my 23a water heater ran on #12 for 35 years before I noticed it, and b) the breaker should cover it.
However, your point is not without merit. If the item can run on a 15a circuit it would be better to change the plug.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

Why wouldn't the 15 amp breaker protect against such overloads?
--
The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
minimize spam. Our true address is of the form snipped-for-privacy@prodigy.net.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Any number of reasons: breaker is old, breaker is defective -- but the most likely hazard is a naive homeowner who becomes irritated by frequent breaker trips and sees 20A device, 20A plug, 20A receptacle, 15A breaker and decides to "fix" the problem by installing a 20A breaker without ever realizing that the wire won't support it.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

Such a naive homeowner could just as easily change both the breaker and the receptacle (or jury-rig an adapter). At some point it's impossible to protect against such things.
--
The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
minimize spam. Our true address is of the form snipped-for-privacy@prodigy.net.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sure - but there's no point in making it easier to screw them up, is there?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Putting a 20 amp outlet on a 14 ga circuit that is protected by a 15 amp CB or fuse is NOT unsafe, and further, it is explicitly allowed by the NEC. The circuit will still be protected at the 15 amp level that is appropriate for 14 gauge wire.
OTOH, installing a 20 amp BREAKER in a 14 gauge circuit with a 15 amp _or_ 20 amp outlet WOULD be unsafe and a violation of code.
--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.