How Much Concrete Can A Pickup Carry?

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Hi All,
My Dad is loaning me his 1989 Dodge Ram, the sports model so it is not a huge truck, to haul concrete and posts, etc. for a new vinyl gate and fence. I just finished gating in one end of my back yard, but now am ready to do the other end.
I need 15 bags of pre-mixed concrete. Each bag weighs 60 pounds. Can this little truck handle 900 pounds?
I sure don't want to risk damaging this truck. You may get a chuckle out of it, but Dad keeps it spit shined, and it only has 21,000 miles on it. The only thing I really miss in it is that there are no air bags.
I will be hauling the concrete 24 miles from my home.
Thanks for your help.
Kate
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On 7/14/2010 12:02 AM, Kate wrote:

Yes, it can definitely handle 900 lbs plus some.
Don
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I had 15 bags of sakrete in a 86 LeBaron. I did put "Low Rider" on the MP3 player when I was leaving Home Depot.
That is less than a half ton, what the smallest pickups are rated for
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It'll be fine, Kate. It's a good idea, though, to have them stack the bags of mix toward the front of the truck's bed to equalize the load a bit.
Nonny
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Re: How Much Concrete Can A Pickup Carry?:

+1 on that. You won't have any problem with that load.
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One day when you are bored, fill it with gas and two people, one driver, one passenger, and take it to the local truck stop and have it weighed. Lots of them will do it free. Get that weight stub. Now, look at your door plate for GCVWR, or gross combined vehicle weight rating, which is the total weight for the truck and everything you can put in it before it breaks. That, for future reference is the MAXIMUM amount the truck can carry. It is always good to do just 75% of that.
HTH
Steve
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Kate wrote:

Most likely it will be OK. Ask Dad if it's a 1/2 ton truck. If so legally you can carry a total of 1000#, but in real life you can go a little over that. Keep in mind you add all of the load including driver and passengers and all that stuff behind the seat.
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On 7/14/2010 1:28 AM, Tony wrote:

the "1/2 ton" nomenclature has nothing to do with carrying capacity.
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On 7/14/2010 6:35 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

I beg to differ. It has everything to do with carrying capacity, as long as you understand the weight of the driver and passengers are to be considered part of the payload (as the previous poster wrote).
The bottom line is what the owner's manual says it can carry. in 1989, there were D100, D150 (both half ton), D250 (3/4 ton) and D350 (one ton) models.
Newer Rams can carry more than their designation would suggest but that's an '89 model.
Jay
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On 7/14/2010 6:00 AM, Jay Hanig wrote:

You can beg all you want, the fact is that a so called "1/2 ton" truck can carry a whole lot more than 1000 lbs and all you have to do is look at the payload ratings for the truck to see that. The nomenclature of 1/2, 3/4 etc etc is a throwback to very early years of trucks. It has nothing to do with payload capacities today.
s
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Steve Barker wrote:

So what does it mean?
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Since I don't think anyone's mentioned it yet, put the load as far forward in the bed as possible and it will handle a little better (less sway).
However...if you're concerned about having that much weight near the center of the frame (I don't know whether you should or not) then either spread it out and drive slowly or make two trips and load it forward.
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Larry Fishel wrote:

Or put it directly over the rear axle.
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wrote:

Definitely NOT the proper way to load a truck close to the limit.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yes you are right. But it does reduce sway a lot. I was thinking of the reason they put the 5th wheel hitch over the rear axle. But that is a whole other story. My bad.
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wrote:

They put the fifth wheel over the axle because putting it forward of the axle is difficult.. Weight between the axles is a stabilizing influence, while outside the axles, either for or aft, has a very "polar" effect.
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What does any marketing term mean?
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keith wrote:

About a half a ton of bull and a whole ton of shit.
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Oh. You're in marketing.
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On 7/14/2010 2:27 PM, Tony wrote:

It doesn't mean anything. The only place the word is used is in laymens conversations. It's not mentioned in mfgr's literature.
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