How many wheelbarrows for a yard of concrete?

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I will be having a delivery this week of concrete. I am getting 3.25 yards. Two and a quarter yards will make a 9 x 20 foot driveway extension in front of my garage. The other yard will go into a nearby shed to make a cement floor to replace the dirt floor, which is 6 X 12 ft., plus a small pad outside the door from whatever is left.
For the driveway extension the truck can drive right to it. But the shed is not accessible by truck. That one yard needs to be taken into the shed with wheelbarrows. I am trying to comprehend how many (average size) wheelbarrow trips will have to be made to carry that one yard to the shed. I am asking to get a rough idea so I know how many friends and wheelbarrows to have on hand. The delivery company said that their delivery guys cant spend a lot of time at one place, so I need to be ready to get the cement moved fast.
I know someone is going to ask me what I mean by average size wheelbarrow. I dont know how they are rated, but the two that I have are the ones sold at most garden supply places, department and hardware stores for the average homeowner. My guess is the "bucket" is about 28" wide, 35" long, and 10" deep (of course the corners are rounded and the bucket tapers in at the bottom.
My guess (and only a guess), is one wheelbarrow load can hold about 2.5 cubic feet, (without spilling all over the place), and a full yard of concrete is 27 cubic feet. So my guess is about 11 trips. Does this sound about right?
One other thing. Since I plan to use whatever concrete is left over to make a pad in front of the shed door, outside, what is the best way to make an adjustible form? My idea is to make the form the actual width I want (which is 41"), then just leave the end board (away from the door) without nails or stakes, so I can fasten it after the cement is there and I know how much cement is left. If by chance the pad seems too small, I have a few bags of redi-crete to use up, so I can mix them.
Thanks
Alvin
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On 15 Oct, 09:25, snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

Any chance of the delivery company using a boom truck to deliver the concrete directly to where the shed will be or is that way too expensive for this size job?
http://www.putzmeister.com/products/boompumps/index.cfm
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How much is a boom truck option?
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-- How much is a boom truck option?
$20.00...No wait...$200....No wait...$2000... ;-)
Where do you live? How long of a boom do you need? What will be the travel time from the plant to the delivery point? Are there any road restrictions/usage permits that will need to be dealt with?
See my point? My guess is that the cost of the boom option would be highly dependent on the specific job. I'll also hazard a guess and say that using that option for a 3.25 yard load would be cost prohibitive.
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wrote:

This is a rural area. They probably dont even have one. If they did, I am sure the cost would not be worth it. It's only one yard that has to be hauled. Actually, if they had an extra long chute, I could probably unscrew a few sheets of the barn steel siding and they could dump it thru the wall, but their chute is probably too short to get between the nearby garage and trees, and by the time I open the wall, using the wheelbarrow and having a few friends over seems easier.
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replying to DerbyDad03, Tim wrote: You would not want to pay for a cement pump for one yard of crete will will prob laugh at you two buggie two guys max i could do it by myself without issues
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On Sat, 18 Jun 2016 04:44:01 +0000, Tim wrote:

I did this once. $200 for the cement, $100 to bring the truck. It would have taken me 10 trips with the car just to get the materials. Plus I avoided cleaning the wheelbarrow afterwards.
(It was not a pump, just a regular 'beehive' truck.)
--
http://mduffy.x10host.com/index.htm

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For small quantities, I've always used "mix on site" concrete trucks. They come to your site and can provide anywhere from 1/4 yard up to about 10 yards or so. They only mix up what you need so there is no waste to dispose of. The trip out is most of the expense, so the more you order the cheaper it ends up being per yard.
The mix on site trucks cost a bit more, but they're a great option if you need small amounts.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On Sat, 18 Jun 2016 15:35:02 -0000 (UTC), HerHusband

Or just rent a mixer from your local "rent-all" or Home Despor and mix your own
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First; Unless you have wheeled mud before, do not fill the barrow full. Even if you have, do not fill the barrow full. Better several extra trips than spilling a load. Concrete is _heavy_.
Second: Be sure the path to the shed is smooth and firm. If needed, lay down sheets of plywood overlapped so the loaded barrows don't run into the 'lap'.
Harry K
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NO ! Its $ 300 minimum charge PLUS time for a line pump/boom here
USE the 3 or 4 wheelbarrow method
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On Oct 15, 9:25 am, snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

Fill it with five gallon buckets of water. Count the buckets. Do an online conversion from gallons to volume, tweak to get cubic yards.

Maybe. Homeowner wheelbarrows are in that neighborhood, maybe slightly more. Contractor wheelbarrows hold about 6 CF.

Fine.
R
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On Oct 15, 9:25 am, snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

I always guessed 2 tons per yard. And 300lbs is about all I want to hump around in a wheelbarrow. 13-14 trips
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On 15 Oct, 09:25, snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

Oh, sorry, forgot to offer an answer to your question...
From: http://www.doityourself.com/stry/patiosteps
"One cubic yard of ready-mix yields nine contractor-size wheelbarrows of concrete. "
From: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/06/AR2007070601019.html
"A construction wheelbarrow full of concrete can weigh nearly 400 pounds."
AFAIK a contractor's wheelbarrow is roughly 6 Cu ft. Since your's appear to be much smaller, 11 trips seems too few. Of course, it also depends on how much weight a person and or a given wheelbarrow can handle.
Actually, what you want to use is the 2 wheeled, spout nosed wheelbarrow shown on page 2 of this document. Look for the red NEW! graphic.
http://www.brentwoodindustries.com/spg/pdfs/BrentwoodWB.pdf
Here's a "fun" site for estimating the cost of concrete construction, including info moving material in wheelbarrows. This link should take you to page 553 - ignore the references to horse drawn carts, but pay close attention to the comparison of "active" vs. "lazy" workers. ;-)
http://tinyurl.com/34s69v
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snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com writes:

Go out and measure it. Take the width and length at the bottom.
A cubic yard is 36x36x36
My guess is you can only fill to about 6 inches of the 10.
Roughly 10 trips without the math. When you have the measurements divide
width times height times depth into 36x36x36.
Don't assume to can use the whole depth.
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Math is our friend...I'm not doubtin' your numbers, just trying my own. Let me know if I missed something...it's Monday.
As I posted earlier from: http://www.doityourself.com/stry/patiosteps :
"One cubic yard of ready-mix yields nine contractor-size wheelbarrows of concrete. "
AFAIK a contractor's wheelbarrow is ~ 6 cu ft and the OP's is estimated (by him) to be only 2.5 cu ft.
Now, if I do a little math and divide 1 cu yd by 6 cu ft I get
27 / 6 = 4.5 (not nine) which means they are only putting 3 cu ft in each wheelbarrow - IOW - half full.
Therefore, if the OP puts only 2 cu ft into his 2.25 cu ft wheelbarrow, it's going to take at least 13.5 loads. If he follows the lead of the DIY site and only fills his wheelbarrow half way, it's going to take 18 loads.
Does that sound right?
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Maybe, but I didn't do any math. I looked at the OPs numbers, saw he was just under 36 on the length 1/4 under on the width and 1/6th on the height and that sounded like about 10. Give or take a few.
Why do math when the OP doesn't have accurate measurements to start with?
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re: Maybe, but I didn't do any math.
I guess there are varying degrees of "doing the math". :-)
Seems to me that you can't "see" that he was fractions under a number without do some sort of math. If I "see" you get served a steak that is twice as big as mine, then I did some math just before I called server over to our table.
You gonna eat that potato?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Snip
Having pushed a wheelbarrow or three hundred as a kid- volume isn't as important as weight. Wet concrete weighs like a bitch- it would take superman to push a full-size wheelbarrow of it, especially since we are usually talking pushing it on dirt or bouncy walkboards. A full one would usually lose the top 3-4 inches of fill to splashing. If you are filling the wheelbarrows out of a truck or portable mixer, more important to have many strong backs and several wheelbarrows staged. You only have so many minutes of 'open' time before you have to dump the load Right There, rather than in the forms. Once the concrete shows up, IT is in charge- no smoke breaks, no lunch, no potty breaks. You move and shovel and screed till the forms are filled.
Back before concrete pumpers came along, they used to have cute little self-dumping gas-powered walk-behind 'mules' for use on sites where you couldn't get the truck close enough.
aem sends...
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Yep. I can't believe how everybody got all wrapped up around 'how much does it hold' ignoring the fact that _noone_ with sense would ever fill a barrow full. At least noone who has ever moved even one barrow with mud in it.
Harry K
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