How many HALO H7 hi-hats can I wire in series on 20A circuit

For my basement reno, I am wiring 16 (yes 16) HALO H7 hi-hats all on 1 switch, dedicated 20A circuit. I laid in all the hi-hats already and started to wire them up. I find it easy to just daisy chain all of them. One feed in and another feed out. Is there any limit as to how many you can wire together like this? I know a 20A circuit can handle it, my concern is the "quick-connect" connectors inside the box. Can these connectors handle a load of 8-9 amps, especially at the first hi- hat where the total load of the 16 hi hats will be? I would think these "quick-connects" have to be rated for at least 15 amps.
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Those connectors are pretty good. I wouldn't worry at all. Most important, be sure the tinned stranded wires are in the connectors solidly. You can string as many fixtures as the bulb wattage total will support on the circuit
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you could run a parelline line to the other end and power it from your switch to minimize load on connector one. although i dont know if this is code compliant.
but just running a non connected line to other far end and marking the mid point box would give you options in the future if you ever have a problem.
In my job connector overheats and fails is a everday event:(
which does keep me working:)
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On 1/1/2011 11:38 AM, Mikepier wrote:

I commend you for actually thinking about it. The wiring inside the fixture is usually rated for high temperatures so the only thing you would have to worry about would be the connectors. Do you know who manufactures the connectors? There was a discussion about them here a while back along with links to the various companies that produce them. In a room like what you have, I usually install two switches so half the lights are on each switch so it's easy to see what you're doing when it comes time to change bulbs or service the fixtures. I wired up a room in a business so half the lights could be left off making it easier for the employees to watch training videos. I guess it's all about what you will use your man cave for? :-)
TDD
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wrote:

I only have one switch, and the walls are already closed up at the switchbox, so I can't run another switchleg.
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When I was at HD this morning, I was looking at the quick-connects from IDEAL. Found the spec sheet, could not find current ratings, but says its good for 600V so I don't know if it means its good.
http://www.idealindustries.com/media/pdfs/products/specsheets/in-sure_push-in_32-34.pdf
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http://www.idealindustries.com/media/pdfs/products/specsheets/in-sure_push-in_32-34.pdf typical building wire is rated for 600 volts, so I would suspect that connectors would have to have the same rating
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Ummm. Voltage is not current. For outlets, the pass through current rating is usually the same as the outlet rating, but I don't know that holds for Halo fixtures. Wouldn't you just pigtail each fixture?
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Typically, you would, but Halo fixtures come with built in quick connectors, and they work really well. They're designed for feed through, so they would have to be rated for the size conductor that will fit in them.
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On 1/1/2011 1:37 PM, Mikepier wrote:

http://www.idealindustries.com/media/pdfs/products/specsheets/in-sure_push-in_32-34.pdf I've used a lot of those connectors for years and have had very good luck with them. Those are actually called "push in connectors", the "quick connectors" which I thought you were writing about are something different. They are actually little plugs and sockets so a fixture can be disconnected from the power for servicing.
http://tinyurl.com/33qnv2n
The push in connectors should have the same current rating as the wire size supported. #12 is rated for 20 amps so you should have no problem.
TDD
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wrote:

Correct, sorry to confuse everyone. I meant push in connectors.
I agree that if it is rated to accept #12 wire, then it should carry 20A with no problem. In my case I have probably half that load at 10Amps with 16-65w bulbs in the HALO's
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On 1/1/2011 9:45 PM, Mikepier wrote:

I'm glad I was able to help you see the light. (pun intended) :-)
TDD
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If you use CFL's, your current should be 1/3 of the level for incandescent bulbs.
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On 1/1/2011 11:21 PM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Only problem is, the CFL's would be harder to dim. :-)
TDD
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wrote:

Thanks for the suggestion, but I will not be using a dimmer.
My basement was dark and dreary and now its bright and sunny. And yes, I could have used 14ga wire to make things easier, but since everything was wide open, I went the extra mile and ran 12ga.
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On 1/1/2011 11:38 AM, Mikepier wrote:

they'll be fine. and you can do it on a 15a circuit with 14 ga wire if you please. It'll be a lot easier to work with.
--
Steve Barker
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We have some office lighting at work that is very similar to what you have. The lights are daisy chained in groups of 4 then those groups connect together. I just remodeled my kitchen and wired it the same way. Kitchen has a U layout and the fixtures on the left are connected together in a group as are those on the right and bottom of the U each in their own group. Power was fed from a central j box which was the original fixture.
Jimmie
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