How many dedicated circuits do I need?

Page 2 of 2  


The first thing to do is to determine what version of the NEC you are under (2005 or 2008), and whether there are any local amendments. You could just wire to the 2008 NEC, but the 2005 NEC provides a bit more flexibility in certain areas.

As fixed in place equipment, it is not required to be dedicated, but it is often a good idea. If the nameplate current draws are low enough, you could combine it with another piece of equipment, e.g. the garbage disposal.

Required to be on a dedicated circuit if cord and plug connected. Otherwise, like the dishwasher.

You could put this on the kitchen circuits (the small appliance branch circuits, SABC); otherwise, like the dishwasher.

There's nothing wrong with putting a fridge on a gfci. If the fridge trips the gfci (as an old one may), then it is leaking current to ground, and should be replaced.
Under the 2005 NEC, you have the option of using a simplex receptacle and a dedicated circuit to avoid the GFCI requirement. Under the 2008, GFCI is mandatory for an unfinished basement.

Since you list a laundry room below, this does not require a dedicated circuit; if it is in the laundry room, plug it into the laundry circuit.

The NEC just requires 2 SABCs, with no limitations on the number of outlets on each. Is this a local requirement?

Likely requires a dedicated circuit, although I'm not sure.

Like the dishwasher, as far as I know.

The dining room has to be on a SABC. So you could combine it with one or more of the kitchen circuits. More common is to run a separate SABC just for the dining room.

Right.
How you divide up the remainder of the house is up to you, the NEC does not have a 1 circuit per X square feet requirement. Is there a local code?

Space in the panel for a surge protector?
Lighting circuits and smoke alarms? Whether to wire those separately to mix them with general use receptacles is a personal preference.
Water heater?
Any other fixed in place equipment?

Yes.

If you modify a circuit, then you have to put in an AFCI breaker if required. Under the 2005 NEC, it is just circuit with outlets in bedrooms ("outlet" includes receptacles and any other boxes, like smoke detectors). Under the 2008 NEC, the requirement is much broader and you should check the details.
Cheers, Wayne
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I guess I'll call the building inspector tomorrow to find out which one has been adopted in NJ and what local changes if any have been adopted in my town.
$50 a pop for AFCIs !
Any cheaper source?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why is OP doing a COMPLETE rewire?
For a lot less work and expense he may be able to selectively upgrade kitchen and bath, replace main service and just run new circuits to heavy loads.
just wondering cause a complete gut and replace is hard work and very disruptive, and better done if your gutting the home and say insulating too.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 10 Jan 2010 15:36:58 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Perhaps he has ungrounded early romex, or early aluminum wire? Or perhaps the wiring has proven to be inadequate, and the original layout is so convoluted that just rewiring is so much simpler to figure out???
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 10, 10:53 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Why you ask? All 3 of the reasons you mention. 1 Aluminum wiring. Ends have snapped off in 50% of the locations I have touched, like when changing the ceiling fixtures. One flickering utility light in the basement turned out to have burned loose wire in the box. I have also had breakers trip because the load wires attached to the breakers had softened and worked loose from deformation. 2 Inadequate. SWMBO's 50,000 Watt hair dryer dims most of the upstairs lights when powered on. House was built in 70s when nobody had computers, monitors, printers, cell phones, etc. 3 Convoluted. Before I start I'll need to map the entire house outlet by outlet because things that may be up to code make no sense. When the toaster and coffee pot are on and someone trips the breaker by turning on the microwave the basement lights also go out.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne Whitney wrote:

IMHO Wayne has the best and most complete answer.

One calculation is at 3 watts per square foot which gives 1 circuit (15A) per 600 sq. ft. But there are alternate calculations and some of the required circuits may count.

As someone said, a 20A circuit for the bathroom(s).

Smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms are not a NEC requirement but may well be required by state or local codes.

Generally in the 2008 NEC if a circuit does not require a GFCI it requires AFCI protection. There is a list.
=============I have major doubts the OP has a realistic idea of the difficulty if walls are not open. Or the amount of work involved.
The OP should have _at least one real good book_ on wiring based on the NEC version that will be enforced. That book should have answered many of the questions that were asked. And, for example, there were minimal questions about where GFCIs are required. Or what rooms the kitchen appliance circuits have to supply.
The OP had best make a floor plan, with all the electric indicated, and run it past the inspector. There are *numerous* gotchas that are possible. Like, with a "complete rewire" will receptacle spacing have to meet the requirements for new construction. The attitude of the inspector will make a huge difference in how smoothly the job will go. If I was the inspector my attitude would not be very good unless the OP has done a *lot* more research. The inspector does not have to tell you how to do the work, and you may find out there is a problem when the inspector tags it.
While you can get good answers to limited questions on this newsgroup, this question is way to broad to give a very complete answer.
--
bud--

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You may want to add a couple of 20 amp Edison circuits for the kitchen. I have two double duplex circuits that are above the kitchen counter for things like toasters, electric skillets, deep fryers.... A third would sometimes be handy. Bathrooms can need more current than you think. Two blow dryers going at once will pop a breaker. An outlet inside a closet can come in handy. I use it to keep things like cell phones and iPods recharged. My wireless router is there too. Another closet has a vacuum cleaner plugged in and ready to go. If you decorate for Xmas having outles handy for plugging in the tree and such without having to drag out all the extension cords you can find is really nice. Got a garage? having outlets just inside the doors is very handy, mine had one in the middle of each wall. That location was mostly useless. Think about your lifestyle, "where" may be more important than "how many".
Jimmie
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

While Edison circuits would make the number of pulls less I plan on staying away from them.
I don't know how common the floating common or 'hot' common problems are but I don't need to take the chance. Lowes has 1,000' of 12/2 for $260 so wire isn't that expensive.
Also the next guy might be very surprised to find 220v in a junction box under the sink.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Limp Arbor wrote:

I'd worry more about the electricity usage than the square feet. My house was wired by an idiot electrician. I have the living room, two bathrooms and the master bedroom on ONE 15A circuit. It could just about handle the six 60W lamps and the space heater in the bathroom. Much more than that blew the breaker.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 10 Jan 2010 06:16:18 -0800 (PST), Limp Arbor

Herre, code requires them in bedrooms. Don't know what code is where you are.
Ken
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.