how long does it REALLY take. tilework.

first off, ive never done tile before, but im pretty handy. i dont forsee any major problems...
so how long am i going to be without a shower? say the first day i pull down the old stuff and fix the inevitable thing that was unforseen hiding in the walls. next day install the new cement board, tub, and get the plumbing hooked up. third day i get the tile in, and grout it the forth day. does this seem reasonable? now we gotta wait for drying and all that.
so what, 10 days total?
randy
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randy wrote:>first off, ive never done tile before, but im pretty handy. i dont forsee

Someday, it'll all be over....
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xrongor wrote:

10 days is reasonable *if* you don't run into something. If you're swapping the tub out, watch out for flooring problems. Also, if there is any question about the tub/shower control (faucet), change it; you won't get another chance...
Jim
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Hi there,
I did that exact job last year. Day 1....I ripped out the old tile (put something in the tub so you don't chip it like I did). I put in the cement board around the whole shower area... and used the mud compound and fiber tape to fill the cracks and corners. A long day... Freaking cement board is heavy stuff and hard to put on the walls when you are by yourself like I was.
Day 2... Sand smooth the rock and lay the tiles to the walls..let the glue dry overnight. See if you can buy, borrow , rent, steal a 'Rotozip" which is excellent for cutting tiles in circles etc to go around your fixtures.
Day 3 .......Lay the grout to the tiles and clean everything up
I can't rightly remember but there was a waiting period to wait for the grout to dry before putting on the grout sealer...That I THINK was two days...... after that it's just a matter of caulking....
....so depending on how agressive of a worker you are it shouldn't take you more than about 5-6 days with the last few days only being a few hrs a day because you have to wait for things to dry before moving to the next step. I would hit the walls with the grout etc and then go fishing...then hit with the sealer and go fishing...etc...LOL First two days are the toughest and longest days.
Shouldn't take you longer than about 6 days.... Jim

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Jim wrote:

Sand the rock? You mean the cement board? SAND it???

"Glue"? I hope you used type 2 aliphatic. Or urethane.
dadiOH _____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.0... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico ____________________________
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"SAND"...oops sorry.....SMOOTH the CEMENT board... with whatever you have...I couldn't remember. I smoothed it out with something. Good Lord...
And yes Glue....as in whatever the sticky stuff that came with the the bathroom tile...I don't know if i used 2 aliphathetic or 12 alipthateitc...or just plain SNOT!.....whatever!!!!..I used the stuff reccomended for tile usage...It's been up for over a year and work just fine.
Geeze...I wasn't telling him HOW to do it...I was giving him a rough idea of how long it took so I didn't bother to use the correct terminology as I didn't feel it was important. It was the time thing he was concerned with... picky picky... Jim

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ya thats all i needed was a time estimate. i can get the how to from a book at the library and by reading the instructions. <g>
i got a rotozip a while back and i use it all the time. i love that tool. glad to see ill be using it again!!
thx jim
randy

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It's a good idea to go over the Durock (especially the seams) with a rubbing block to smooth out any high spots. Doesn't take long but it can save a lot of time when setting tile.
RB
dadiOH wrote:

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wrote:

10 days should be more than enough even if you run in to problems. Five would be realistic if you don't.
Also, if this is your only shower. after you get done working just tape plastic to the wall draped down in the tub and take your shower(s). Pull the plastic down afterward on the tiling and grouting days so that it can cure.
Steve B.
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already ran a beam in the basement to support the extra tub weight (dont know if its needed, but my house is over 100 years old and i dont want to find out <g>) and im going to have to fix the vent. they just ran it to the attic instead of through the roof. and something else will rear its ugly head im sure. thats why im guessing it will be more like 10 <g>

ya its the only shower. someone put a shower stall in and no tub so im rectifying that situation. i love to layin the tub!! and my next door neighbor said i could use the shower there, but if it comes down to that ill be making a little plastic stall.
thx for your feedback! randy
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Ya know, there's always an odd bird that'll tell you there's a better way. That's me. I dislike how water migrates through cement. People use the latex additive, but it still happens. I dislike how the space at the tub has to be recaulked. I love how tile stops the water, but the grout is the weak link.
So I did it differently.
Not gonna tell you about bedding in the tub/shower unit with thinset, or any of the other details. Just talking about tile.
I prepaired the wall by using three different thicknesses of Styrofoam so that it came EXACTLY even with the wall studs. After all, I don't want a cold wall. A cold wall is a primary reason for mold and mildew on the wall.
Then I covered it with Greenboard. After installing my 5' shower unit.
For the tile selection, I took some pure white silicone with me to the tile outlet. Selected a square foot one, a pattern called Arctic Ice. 72 cents apiece as contractor's grade, my wife couldn't tell the difference from the same pattern at over 3 dollars apiece.
The silicone is nonpaintable, so that it also resists staining. I ran a wiggly bead on the back, then a bead along the bottom of the first one, and a mating bead on the shower unit. Then I pushed the tile against the Greenboard about an inch from its final resting place, slid it firmly into place. Causing excess to be pressed out, as I got it with my finger and smeared it onto the Greenboard where the next tile would go. No carefully measured space between the tiles, just one against the next, with 50 year white silicone in between, with the joints minimally apparent.
Worked so well, I removed my window, replaced it with glass block, and ran the tiles to the edge, so that tiles and block were even with each other. Storm window stayed, with disabled lock.
I realize you'll probably do your tiling the standard way, but I just wanted to tell you that there is what I consider a better way. And if it hadn't been for the glassblock work, I could have finished all of it in a few hours. Without having any of it 'set up' on me, except the silicone, and that was a predictable thing.

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Here's the solution if you don't want to caulk around a tub. Easy, neat, clean and caulk free.
http://www.schluter.com/english/products/2002/sectiond/dilexas/410-index.html
RB
Michael Baugh wrote:

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thx for all the tips. ill read over it again when im actually ready to proceed. im rewiring the garage today...
randy

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Your time schedule looks OK.. Thats what a PRO took to do ours (plus the floor)
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Here's the schedule from my recent bathroom floor project:
1. Argue with wife over tile color and layout - 3 weeks 2. Ditto grout - 1 week 3. Demo existing shower, find modifications previous owner obviously did with his own three hands, fix - 3 days 4. Hang cement board, tape and mud - 1 day 5. Recover from hanging cement board - 3 days 6. Realize that you don't want want to look across a freshly tiled floor and see the wall tiles sagging, decide to tile floor first - 1 day 7. Tile wall - 1 day 8. Grout all - 1 day 9. Discover grout haze you missed, clean - 1 day 10. Discover grout effloresce, clean - 2 days 11. Let grout dry - 3 days 12. Seal grout 3x - 1 day (3 coats, dawn, noon, late evening) 13. Bask in gratitude of teenage daughter getting "her" bathroom back - 10 nanoseconds
Yep, ten days is about right! :)
Mitch
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Enjoyed your expose. There was quite a bit of similarity with my recent bathroom remodeling, which I could not resist adding in the form you used: 1. Argue with wife for four weeks whether I should take out perfectly good tile wall in the bath/shower area, just because it may not match new tile, and four shower curtain holes will remain in tile when I put in shower door. 2. Nag wife for two weeks to pick tile and grout. 3.Drag feet for one week before beginning demolition. "Attack plan stage." 4. Two days to remove fixtures, old tile, and old floor mastic. 5.Surprise! 1/2 day to buy plywood and replace section of floor where water leaked from tub. Shower curtains and kids do not go well together. 5. One day researching what to do about toilet flange that will be 1/2" below new tile level. Builder/tile man apparently never heard of underlayment. Off again to HD, 6.Wife finally decides we can cover holes from shower curtain with SS mirror tile pattern, and retain tub wall tile. Thank you, God! 7. One day to lay out and cut all hardibacker boards as underlayment. 8.Start laying down hardiboard on flloor and the find out hand drill to weak to fully embed screws. Rush out to buy first new hand drill in 20 years. 8.Drive first two screws through hardiboard before figuring out torque of new drill is very high. 9. One day to patch and mud walls. 10.One day to carefully cut out large section of the back of vanity because staircase partially intersects wall. 11.Cut plywood to fill in angled wall area of staircase ceiling behind vanity after only 25 years in house. 12 1/2 day to paint room and clean up. 13. Spend 1/2 day with wife laying out tiles in bedroom trying to figure out best pattern for patterned tiles. (Really!) 14. 1/2 day to install full tiles. 1day to cut tiles and install pieces. Find out my tlle scorer/breaker only will take 12" tiles, not 13" tiles. Back to table saw for all cuts. 14. Grout tile and wipe, wash, wash, wash. - one day 15. Buy expensive sealer, apply and wait to long to remove. Take two hours to get residue off tiles. 16 One day to iInstall new wall mouldings, and re-fit wall tiles that were removed or fell off to put in new floor. 16.1/2 day to install shower door on tub. 17.One day to clean and reinstall toilet, mount new vanity, and plumbing. 18.Trim door to fit new tile height. 19. Touch up paint where needed. 20.1/2 day excursion to find new light for bathroom. Fail. Decide to go with swag lamps, but wife wants special ceiling cap. Special order. 21.Two hours to wire up and install new swag lamps.
On 10 Jun 2004 10:37:26 -0700, mitch snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Mitch Skool) wrote:

Gary Dyrkacz snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net Radio Control Aircraft/Paintball Physics/Paintball for 40+ http://home.attbi.com/~dyrgcmn /
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Can you tell me more about this problem and its solution? I think I'm going to be faced with it in a week or so ...
Thanks.

Yeah, well, this happened to me with a brand-freakin-new! 12V Ryobi - I'd used it to put up new cabinet doors, then it crapped out halfway thru the hardibacker on the counters. Have a much more expensive DeWalt now.
JSH
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JSH
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I saw that you already found several methods. I bought an extension flange from HD. I used it, but had some reservations about its strength compared to some what appeared to be more robust one on the internet. I liberally sealed the two flanges together with silicone calk and then screwed the new flange through the old flange into the floor and also.

I figured after 20 years I could splurge. Gary Dyrkacz snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net Radio Control Aircraft/Paintball Physics/Paintball for 40+ http://home.attbi.com/~dyrgcmn /
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