How hot the water?

Page 2 of 2  


Agree with the above. Same here. But if you watch the show, that isn't good enough for Holmes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

its a sensible requirement.........
to minimse exhaust fumes from getting in the living areas of homes, to help energy efficency espically cold winter air infiltrating living areas. to minise the spread of a vehicle fire to the living areas.....
can anyone tell me whats good about a poorly sealed garage....?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Remember that Holmes in on TV. He has to be totally by-the-book, don't-try- this-at-home, professional-driver-closed-course, do-not-attempt, otherwise he could get in serious trouble. If not legally, then from the activists.
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Furnaces and water heaters are usually put in living space without such worries. If they're in the garage, they're less dangerous.
BTW, I assume you live in an area that doesn't get cold. Water in the garage is no big deal here (my WH is in the garage in this house and in the attic above the garage in the other), but it *certainly* would be in the house before that (Vermont).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 21 May 2012 06:58:26 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

When the cat has fired there is virtually NO CO emitted - but the cat has not fired when the car is started and run in the garage.

door between the house and garage and would not have it any other way - but it's been 30 years since a car has been in my garage - - - -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No risk at all there.

When the cat is up to full-operating temperature (about 15 minutes running), modern cars register 0.00% CO on a sniffer. For a few minutes after startup, the exhaust will emit approximately 3-7% CO, but that will decline rapidly as the cat warms up.

You need to take Holmes with a grain of salt; he's a bit like those celebrity chefs.
Holmes is also a bit of a safety and enviro nut, going slightly overboard on those things. He's famously said that he wants houses to be so efficient that you could heat them with a candle, and cool them with an ice cube.

CO works by temporarily displacing oxygen in the blood, since it binds to the same receptors as oxygen. When you die from CO, you simply suffocate to death, which takes a lot of time. And for that to happen, the CO level has to be pretty high, way higher than what's likely to occur in a few minutes of running the car in a garage, even with the door closed. Even if you breathe enough CO to get an oxygen-starvation headache, that will go away on its own once you're removed from the source of the CO.
Gasoline-powered underground mining equipment used catalytic converters as early as the 1940s, to keep CO emissions down to safe levels for the miners. Those cats were far less effective than modern cats, and yet miners did not get CO poisoning.
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

What about that French train going up through a mountain in the Alps to Switzerland. The snow made the tracks slippery, even in the tunnel., the train stalled while then engine pumped out CO. No time right now for me to google for it. In the middle of googling for other things.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you mean the Balvano disaster?That's the only one which shows up in a Google search. That was in 1944.
I can't find out whether this engine was steam or diesel. I also can't find how many hours they spent trying to make the train move. Also, there were a large number of passengers on the train, all of whom were consuming the tunnel's oxygen by the simple act of breathing. In any case, that incident is not applicable to the questions originally posed.
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes, I that's it. Wikip says a steam engine, And it was not France but southern Italy. And it doesn't mention snow. So I'm not a historian.

Okay, I guess it's not too relevant. Low grade coal they say. Of course the OP might be heating low grade water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

BTW, I came across a Facebook page for the Balvano Train Disastter. It wants me to click "Like". What will it mean if I say I like a train disaster?
Oh, it's just copied from Wikipedia. What's the point of that? So I don't ike it anyhow.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 21 May 2012 06:58:26 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Usually they are found by the spouse and buried in the woods, for fear of getting in trouble. That's why you never hear about them.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

TV shows demand drama, telling the home owner about carbon monoxide gives drama. Actually, code requires the ceiling when rooms are above it, and walls shared with a house, to be sealed to be gas tight, and as a fire stop. Now not many people get gassed from their cars, but people sometimes forget to turn the idling car off and gas will seep through into the house. Also, sometimes cars have had a fire for a number of reasons and the garage should have a one-hour firewall between it and the house. Actually, laws have been weakened in this area, where they used to require a double layer of drywall, with both layers taped and mudded and seams staggered, now one layer suffices according to code.
While it is rare that such sealing is actually used, it provides a measure of safety when the worst happens.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That would be a kid living in a trailer park, where the parents mix whiskey in the kids baby bottle milk to shut them up while the parents do their heroin and meth. Besides being born brain damaged, the kid is too intoxicated to know any better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/21/2012 6:44 AM, micky wrote:

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-safest-temperature-settings-for-a-hot-water-heater.htm
(51.66 C). A water temperature exceeding this poses serious risk of bad burns, particularly to children. In fact even at 125 F, if the child puts his or her hand in the water continuously for two minutes he or she may get second or third degree burns.

F (48.88 C). With this water temperature, a child would have to run water over the same place for ten minutes prior to receiving a severe burn.

Probably the spawn of a democrat.
Democrats need someone from the government to tell them what to do and when to do it. Democrats are responsible for all those silly warning labels plastered all over the products we buy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Mine is 130. Lessens the change of bacteria swimming around in it. It does not take me two minutes to determine if I should change the mix to make it more comfortable in the shower.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/21/2012 5:44 AM, micky wrote:

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-safest-temperature-settings-for-a-hot-water-heater.htm
(51.66 C). A water temperature exceeding this poses serious risk of bad burns, particularly to children. In fact even at 125 F, if the child puts his or her hand in the water continuously for two minutes he or she may get second or third degree burns.

F (48.88 C). With this water temperature, a child would have to run water over the same place for ten minutes prior to receiving a severe burn.

children should be supervised and hot water should be 140+ for proper dishwashing and less used.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You use less hot water because you mix it with MORE COLD water. If you're filling a bath for example, you just wind up mixing more cold water with the hot water to get the desired temperature. And in a shower, whatever volume of water you like, well you like and are going to adjust it to the same GPM whatever the mix is.
I have mine set to 130F and the dishes come out nice and clean. Also, many dishwashers have a setting for added heating of the water or will do it autmatically. I'll bet it's more energy efficient to do any additional heating that way than to have a 40 gallon tank sitting around 24/7 hotter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.