How hot the water?

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http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-safest-temperature-settings-for-a-hot-water-heater.htm

(51.66° C). A water temperature exceeding this poses serious risk of bad burns, particularly to children. In fact even at 125° F, if the child puts his or her hand in the water continuously for two minutes he or she may get second or third degree burns.

(48.88° C). With this water temperature, a child would have to run water over the same place for ten minutes prior to receiving a severe burn. How stupid is this kid that the water is burning hot but he keeps his hand in it for 2 minutes? (No offense to little children intended)
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http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-safest-temperature-settings-for-a-hot-water-heater.htm
About as stupid as a grown woman, sitting in a sports car, putting a cup of hot coffee in her crotch.
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As an infant our kid was never near water without a parent supervising. When she got older I was always fully confident that she was smart enough to pull her hand or other body part out of water hot enough to cause pain. I do not think that she was knowlegeable enough to avoid bacteria that can grow in water heaters set at too low a temperature until she was in her mid or late teens.
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Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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Sounds like she doesn't need a nanny state government?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
As an infant our kid was never near water without a parent supervising. When she got older I was always fully confident that she was smart enough to pull her hand or other body part out of water hot enough to cause pain. I do not think that she was knowlegeable enough to avoid bacteria that can grow in water heaters set at too low a temperature until she was in her mid or late teens.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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They did say that was what may result in second or third degree burns. So, assuming that is true, the child would have first degree burns and be injured much sooner.
I keep mine at 130F. That;s the min that dishwasher manufacturers have recommended in my experience. Also, on the other side are the folks warning that at below that you run the risk of legionaires disease growing in the tank.
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On Mon, 21 May 2012 05:56:18 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

(51.66° C). A water temperature exceeding this poses serious risk of bad burns, particularly to children. In fact even at 125° F, if the child puts his or her hand in the water continuously for two minutes he or she may get second or third degree burns.

F (48.88° C). With this water temperature, a child would have to run water over the same place for ten minutes prior to receiving a severe burn.

True.

The guy who sold me the house said something about that. I thought he said I needed 140. (same dishwasher still.)
I finally found my immersion thermomemter (6 or 8 dolllars at Bed Bath and Beyond.) and found that my water is only 120. That's after increasing the temp 2 or 3 times since I bought the WH.
One page said that sme brands come with a low temp and some ship with it set at 140. All the webpages were about turning down the temp, not about turning it up like I have to do.

Apparently you have to inhaled the stuff, from taking a shower, or something to do with AC, or something else that doesn't apply to me.
But I still want it hotter, so that if the bath is not hot enough I can make it hotter. Right now I have to drain out water to make room for my semi-hot water.
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wrote:

BTW, 120 is hot enough for a nice bath, and even requires a little cold water to keep it from being too hot for me. And my dishwasher, which probably has its own heater, at least it does for drying, though I don't use it, works fine.
It's just that the water is not hot enough after a while, and the 120 degree water can barely make it hotter, and often can't without my draining some water out of the tub.
Showers are fine too.
Of course I don't want it very hot, like some seem to.
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A couple of years ago they had an article about this in one of our local newspaper after some kid was admitted to hospital with scalds. They interviewed a long-time emergency-room doctor about the situation. He said that when kids present with scalds, it's almost always because they pulled a boiling pot off the stove. He said just about nobody gets a hospital- visit-type scalds from tap water, even at our standard temperature of 140F.
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Tegger

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Thanks for the real world report. And, a good caution about kids around the stove.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
A couple of years ago they had an article about this in one of our local newspaper after some kid was admitted to hospital with scalds. They interviewed a long-time emergency-room doctor about the situation. He said that when kids present with scalds, it's almost always because they pulled a boiling pot off the stove. He said just about nobody gets a hospital- visit-type scalds from tap water, even at our standard temperature of 140F.
--
Tegger



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wrote in message

When the kids were small, I put red tape on the floor separating the cooking fro the eating area of the kitchen. It was an ABSOLUTE do NOT cross line. (Even the dog knew not to cross it.) When they were old enough to be trusted around the stove, the tape was removed.
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On 05/21/2012 06:48 AM, Attila.Iskander wrote:

I never had a problem burning myself near the stove when I was a kid, heck, I used to roast marshmallows with the gas flame.
When I got older though, that was when appliances became more dangerous.
Jon
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On Mon, 21 May 2012 07:45:53 -0700, Jon Danniken

I roasted them over the fire. Once I missed my mouth and hit my cheek with a hot one. Made a round scar that got bigger as I got bigger. Most scars get smaller. But I think it disappeared eventually.

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On Mon, 21 May 2012 08:48:22 -0500, "Attila.Iskander"

Not really probative, but when I was 9 and in the hospital with a broken leg.... (they did that then. Now after they put the cast on, I think they woud send me home, but I was there for a couplel days.)
When I was there the boy next to me in the ward had gone to the gas stove to make coffee for his mother I was his age and had no idea how to make coffee. or how to make anything. And the stove exploded somehow He was getting skin grafts. And probably came out okay. A few scars on a man are not the problem they would be for a woman.
I suppose stoves are safer now, thugh I don't know what went wrong with his.

What did t he dog do then?

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On May 21, 9:22 am, "Stormin Mormon"

You know what else I'd like to see the real world reports on? How many people are sickened or killed by not having a home garage totally sealed off from the house. If you watch the Holmes shows on TV where Holmes goes around fixing screwed up houses, you know he has a fetish about that. Almost every house he goes into he starts bitching because the bottom of the drywall where it meets the block isn't completely caulked. About where if a water pipe come through the wall and it isn't caulked or the switch plates aren't sealed with gaskets, etc everyone is gonna get sick or die.
And I'm left thinking:
A - I only run my car for 10 secs with the garage door open and the exhaust pointed out.
B - I wonder how much CO a car actually emits today? I'll bet with the cat converters it's very little.
C - He's bitching about this on many, many houses that are not unusual. Most times it's in a subdivision of new houses where while he's fixing one, there must be 100 others right there that were built the same way.
So, inquiring minds want to know. Where are all these sick or dead people? I say the real problem is actually virtually non-existent of we'd have sick people everywhere with all the garages of typical construction that we all see everyday.
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wrote:

I agree with your point that it is likely not a huge safety problem, BUT it is a sign of sloppy workmanship and also typically people do not heat their garages, or if they do, it's heated to a lower temp. than the rest of the house because those big doors don't insulate well. Finally, the furnace and/or water heater may be out there depending on how the house is laid out - it certainly was in my parents' first house. So there's the potential for CO to build up due to a malfunction in one of those appliances as well. So patching all those openings is not only a code requirement but also can help save energy, and the car or truck may not be the only thing in the garage burning fuel.
nate
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Some years ago the president of Baierl auto grop in pittsburgh died along with his wife when their car was left running in the garage.
Another hazard is window screens that pop outward if leaned againsy.
Screens in all homes should be secured to prevent kids from falling out windows
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On 05/21/2012 11:35 AM, bob haller wrote:

I did not know that (googles) you're right, looks like that happened when I was still in grade school though :) guess that explains why it didn't register on my news radar...
nate
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wrote:

child falling out a window.
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Well it may be a code reqt someplace, but it's not a code reqt that is being enforced here in NJ. Sure you can't have big gaping holes in the garage. But I can show you house after house here, new construction where there is no caulking at the bottom of the drywall, no special gaskets on the electric outlets, etc. The kind of stuff Holmes is bitching about. Nor are automatic door closers required between the house and garage, another one of his "You're all gonna die rants"
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On 05/21/2012 12:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I don't believe that the door closers are required, but at least in the last jurisdiction I lived, the fire rated drywall, all joints taped, and a fire door separating the garage from the living space are all definitely required to get an inspection.
nate
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