How hard is it ...................

to make a couple of screen doors?
I have located some Western cedar for $.95 per foot. 1x4, nominal 11/16" x 3 1/2".
I calculate that it will take 15 lineal feet per door, so figure I can add some extra pieces and call it 50' total for a cost of $50.
I can either rout some channels, or perhaps buy channeling for the rubber bulb to go in and hold the screen.
Hinges and clasp, another $20 tops. Total cost for 2 doors, around $100.
The cheapest I have found these doors for is $300 for two, and up from there, some being $450 each.
I have access to a power miter saw, doweling jigs, and about everything one would need to do a decent job. Just how hard would it be to get these flat, square, and nice looking?
I don't think that hard.
Anyone else ever done these?
Caveats? Pointers?
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No rubber channel on wood screen doors, the wood is bowed a bit and the screen stapled into a rabbet and as the bow is released the screen is tensioned. Rabbet, staples and raw edge get's covered with moulding strip. Double your cost estimate. Observe the joinery in a professionally made door.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com wrote:

Yes, that's normal but one *can* use a metal channel and rubber spline. I got tired of the PITA of replacing screen (cat) in my conventional wooden one and routed a dado for the aluminum channel that is about 1/4 x 1/2. Ran some caulk in, set the channel in the caulk, let dry, applied the screen and spline. Much easier to change now.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can't be that tough. Take a close look at the commercial jobs and copy, use waterproof glue. You may get more answers posting on rec.woodworking
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
yeah, i've made some. i wouldn't use dowels, as the joint is what keeps it from racking. i've used a lap joint, but double bisquits would proably work. main thing is to have wood that behaves and stays flat. 11/16 cedar is a little light duty, too. 5/4 would be better. nice to have some wider material for the rails---that will help with strength too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well like anything else, having the right tools makes a project possible.
I look at the cost of buying [whatever] already made vs the cost of buying or renting the tools.
Then there is a learning curve. Second one may come out better than first. And using the screen doors, you may find there are problems, then re-design them, then 3rd door is even better.
Tip: Nothing is square! Measure the tops and bottoms of the door opening as well as left and right sides. Might find that the measurements are different. Don't assume you can measure the width in the middle and it will be the same at the top and bottom!
Also may want to snoop around and look at how other screen doors are constructed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

Been there, done that - If cost is your only concern then you will be better off buying one unless you have an odd side or a special design.
I made one from straight grain douglas fir IIRC. Mortise and tenon joinery is a must. The screen is stapled and the staples are covered with a molding. The last one I build had 8 curved inside corners top section and bottom section. Then custom made curved moldings attached with brass screws to cover the staples in the screen. End result was painted. It was modeled after one made in teak I saw in the islands.
Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.