How glue to polythene?

Page 2 of 2  


Sure is;adhesion using contact adhesives -is- "gluing".
What's YOUR definition of "gluing"?
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Yanik writes:

Bonding with a gluey substance, gluey = viscous. Flowable adhesive that can produce a gap-filling, liquid- or gas-tight bond.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How can you define "gluing" as "bonding with a GLUEY substance"? You're using the term (glue) to define itself.It doesn't work that way.
More accurately,it could be "bonding with a sticky substance or 'adhesive'.",and contact adhesives are sticky. They also are "gluey",they flow,too. How do you think the contact adhesive gets onto the object to be bonded? It either gets painted on as a liquid,or sprayed from a can;again-liquid in aerosol form.
It doesn't have to be "gap-filling",either.It just has to adhere between contact points.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Yanik writes:

You are guilty, literally, of quibbling.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Heat it up really good with a hair dryer, then use the hot glue gun.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes it can be glued with difficulty. A PHD student I lodged with at Uni had to make chemical preparation apparatus out of polythene due to the strange chemicals he was working with (?). Problem with polythene is it is "oily" and most glues won't stick.
He assembled is apparatus either by friction welding, rotate one piece in fast and force onto other piece
or hot air gun and plastic rod
or finally etching surface with chromic acid (nasty stuff) to produce a "crust" which can then be glued.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ian_m wrote:

Uni had

strange
"oily"
piece in

a
nice explanation of best methods there. The usual home method is by melting it, either with a heat sealer or for heavier lumps, a heated pin.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ian_m wrote:

That is a useful trick.
What is chromic acid?
Metals form alkialis, not acids...so it can't be chromium hydroxide..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A quick digging around on google reveals a chromic/sulphuric acid mix is used to etch plastic prior to plating with metals and other plastic coating.
I had a moment that I thought my chemistry memory had failed me............
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ian_m wrote:

Chromium trioxide apparently. And that is ACIDIC?
Well its an oxidiser certainly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A quick wipe over with a flame is much easier :-).
--
Peter Parry.
http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

3M 5200 MIGHT work. Worth a try. Available from any store that carrys marine/boating supplies. If that doesn't do it, I think you will need to find someone who does plastic fabrication and welding.
rusty redcloud
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My friend, who is no longer with us, owned a shop in the Long Beach (CA) Marina that installed polyethylene water and gas tanks in boats and RVs. He would buy the PE tanks in all different sizes and the PE spouts also in different sizes. Because of different applications the tanks were manufactured with no holes and the spouts were of all different sizes.
How to "glue" the spout to the tank ??? Well, he would cut a hole in the tank of the appropriate size in the proper location. He would then take the proper spout which had a flat flange on it and place it in his 3/8" drill (with an adapter that he had made). He would then place the flat surface of the spout flange against the tank directly over the previously drilled hole. He would then turn on the drill. The friction of the spout flange against the tank would heat up and melt both the tank and spout ... thus "welding" the spout to the tank. This took quite a bit of skill but he was real good at it.
Norm

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.