How far uphill can a washing machine pump water?

Arrgh. Ain't nothing easy. Y'all may recall the rotted out main drain line I was whining about recently. Well, I had a guy in to replace it, and although he was expensive ($1400 including new toilet flange, tub trap, and pipes up to kitchen sink drains), he was fast, and seemed to do a good job. All that works fine. However, rather than disturb the old leaded connection into the cracked/epoxied cast iron monster on the wall that leads out to the septic, he stubbed out the copper and used a Fermco. No leaks or anything, but that means the collector/trap arm on the wall for the washer and nuisance drains sits 16-18" higher than it used to. So now, my entry-level 5 YO GE washer, if I do more than a 'small' load, piddles on the floor. That only used to happen if I was washing pillows or something.
Background- the original wall drain for washer, which sits 16" lower, apparently connects to nothing any more. I tested it when I moved in, and an hour later had water all over basement floor. My best guess is that it went to a now-failed or missing dry well. Been meaning to saw it off with the angle grinder and mud it over, but that is another story.
Anyway, when the washer that came with house caught on fire, I had to run out to Sam's and buy the only model they had. I had to extend drain hose a couple feet to reach the other pipe on the wall, but it mostly worked okay, other than minor accidents with washing big spongy things. Now, not so much. Drain comes out of washer at the usual low-down location, and goes up 80 inches or so, and 48 inches sideways. Old drain was maybe 62? inches off floor, and original dead standpipe sits at 66 inches.
Except that I feel kinda broke right now, I do have a solution- call the plumber back to install the plastic sump pit and bigass sump pump previous owner left sitting under the stairs. I had been thinking about one of those little pump-in-a-box things, and put it under the useless sink that just drains onto floor. But plumber said that would never handle the volume from a washer.
Any ideas for a cheap work-around, until I feel rich enough to get guys with jackhammers involved? How much vertical pipe do I need above the trap on the drain everything is poked into? Would a smooth rather than corrugated drain line on washer help? (Nobody sells those, so I'd have to make one from elbows and clear tubing, I think.) Or should I just build a platform for the washer and dryer? Or am I missing an alternative explanation, that shifting the washer around to swap the dryer that self-destructed same week drain did, may have cracked or loosened something under the washer?
As you can see from the questions, I'm no plumber. Any actual ideas or information greatly appreciated.
--
aem sends...

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I have one in a rental that is about 72" off the floor and have never had a complaint. I do provide a extension piece of hose since most washer hoses aren't long enough.
You did not say if your washer is a top or front loader. For a front, I would put it on a pedestal. If you have some scrap you could try it with a top loader. As long as you can get the clothes in and out with no pain it is fine.
Any sump you put in for the purpose is going to need to be able to hold the full washer load and the remaining backflow in the pit. A 5 gallon bucket can help you figure this out. Use the bucket to fill the washer. My off the wall opinion is they hold about 20 gallons. Let me know how close I got.
Also consider that the sump does not have to be in the floor to handle this job and do it well. A farm supply store has many different size of watering tanks that aren't all that pricey. I have been using a RubberMaid model as a bio filter on my fish pond for over 15 years. So sit that puppy beside the washer, pump the water into it and use a cheap sump pump to pump it to the sewer. Total guess for all materials under $200.
Tractor Supply has a farm/ranch type site. You can view stuff from home and then find it local if you don't have one close.
Please do update this thread with your solution.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit http://www.househomerepair.com
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Adding a PS:
Heck you could even use 2, one inside the other, of big brute trash cans if you only planned to use it for temporary. Those big mommas.
Colbyt
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Andy adds:
That's true, it should not "piddle". If it is trying to pump against too high a head, it should just sit there and grunt. Washer discharge pumps are not designed to deliver any significant head are are very low pressure pumps. Remember, it takes about .44 psi to lift the water 1 foot, so 80 inches or 6 1/2 feet is only about a 3 psi requirement. Anyway, the instruction manual with your washer might tell you lthe max head it will service. If not, the discharge hose supplied with the unit is a good idea of something near the max.....
However, it should not "piddle" under any condition unless it leaks out the end of the hose.... If you assembled the hose to the unit yourself, keep an eye on the connection to the pump while the unit is running. If the hose is intact, you may need a better clamp...
Andy 2.0 in Eureka, Texas
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On 2/27/2011 5:50 PM, Andy wrote:

Checked hose, all connections dry, and no obvious kinks. However, there is a ribbed/hoseclamped coupler where the factory hose, and the hose off the old washer that I used to extend it, meet. Wondering if the diameter at that joint is too small. At the time I made the hose, it didn't look any smaller than the inside of the corrugations(or the output pipe of the washer), and has worked 'okay' for five years. I did dig up the owner's manual, both real and online. (RTFM, what a concept), and it claims drain can be up to 8 feet/2.5 meters higher. At 80 inches, I should be well within that range.
Mebbe I'll stop by the appliance repair place tomorrow after work and ask them, and see if they have a proper extended-length hose. These entry-level big-box-special GE laundry items don't seem to have a very good rep, from what I understand. Perhaps there is a common failure point in the plumbing under the tub that they are aware of. My gut says there is something clogged/cracked/loose inside the washer.
--
aem sends...

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Ive seen machines pump up to a 6 or 7 ft drain. Have also seen this problem solved by having the machine drain into a a laundry tub that was being used as a sump for a sump pump. It was kind of a jury rigged thing but it worked well. You may want to try sealing the connection where the hose goes into the sewer. If you are lucky a siphon will start that will actually draw the water from the machine. Once the machine is empty the siphon will break.
Jimmie
Jimmie
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On 2/27/2011 4:36 PM, aemeijers wrote:

put an above-floor sump pit made from a 7 or 8 gallon plastic tote. Check this pic and the following 3 pics. https://picasaweb.google.com/actodesco/OurFranklinHouse#5481213572891670850 It works very well. The pump was a re-use pump from my old house. Actually, I removed it from service when we returned from vacation and found it running continuously, just heating (almost boiling) the small amount of water in the pit. Subsequently, it served as an emergency pump for about a year in a friend's house, so I guess it wasn't damaged too bad.
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If you have a laundry sink, I think this Saniswift pump will work fine:
http://www.saniflo.com/SANISWIFT.aspx .
I just priced one at a local plumbing supply place and they said the cost was $190.
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On 2/28/2011 8:43 PM, RogerT wrote:

No, actually, it is a porcelain over cast iron 3-hole wall-hung (like you would see in a 1930s school washroom) that is much older than the house, that previous owner liberated somewhere, and never got finished installing. Totally unsuitable for laundry use, but I hate to shitcan a grand old sink like that. I really should look for a casting date on it sometime.
I talked to appliance repair guy- he said that the 80 inch standpipe height is much too high, no matter what owner's manual says. I spent some time today staring at the non-installed sump pit and pump previous owner left behind, and the circle of failed paint on the floor under near the drain stack. Pump has obviously been used, but there is no way to tell if a plastic pit was used sitting on floor for clean or gray water. I now suspect previous owner was having same problem I am, and just used the pit and pump sitting on floor next to washer. Once I get past some other urgent chores (like taxes), I may do some experiments, since all it will cost me is a fresh section of drain tubing and some fittings. Until then, I'll just not do 'extra large' loads, or use the 'whites' cycle, since that seems to be when it either splashes over side of tub, or shuts off so suddenly with so much water in the hose, that the backflow from hose overflows the pump.
Yeah, I looked at the Saniswift at the borg a couple times, and at the plastic laundry sink kits. I'm a little unsure how I would install it with no vent nearby, other than just put a pipe sticking up higher than the connections on wall, and rely on some sort of air gap setup to prevent backflow. Plumber implied I'd have to lose the P-trap on the side arm sticking out for any sort of pump arrangement to work. I'm no plumber- all this is PFM to me.
--
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On 2/28/2011 10:35 PM, aemeijers wrote:

at all. Actually, your hose coming out of the washer will act as its own trap. When I built my plastic tote on-floor sump (several posts earlier) I did put a trap from the sink into the tote-sump. It's actually a 'dreaded' S-trap, which apparently has the problem of being sucked out on rare occasions. But I really don't care as it is only sink water from washing my hands, etc. and it dumps out on the ground anyway.
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wrote:

I don't have the energy to read your whole post, but my wm wasn't draining a few years ago so I bought a new pump. I cut open the orlginal pump and didn't see anything wrong with it. A year or two later, it occured to me that my drain hose was sort of twisted for the last several years, in order to have it end where I wanted it to, and I wonder now if the hose maybe had kinked and the pump was never bad at all.
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wrote:

If the washer was made in China, Taiwan, or any other foreign country, throw it away. If it was made in America, you should be able to pump the wash water to the moon. Since the moon is lacking in water, the occupants up there would appreciate your laundry water. However it will take over 5000 gallons of PVC cement to glue together all the 10 foot sections of PVC pipe to reach the moon. You better start glueing those pipes now.
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On 3/4/2011 3:47 AM, snipped-for-privacy@hell.com wrote:

Um, use the 20 foot sections, it will only take half as much glue. ^_^
TDD
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On Fri, 04 Mar 2011 03:57:35 -0600, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Drinking straws and duct tape. Straws are available free at your nearest fast-food establishment.
Calculating the number of straws that need to run in parallel and the amount of duct tape required is left as an excercise for the reader.
(it's possible that a push-fit between straws would even be sufficient, in which case total cost = 0)
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