How does one wire a 240v outlet?

I have added 120v outlets before, but how hard is it to add a 240v outlet in a home? I am going to buy an electric kiln for firing pottery, and will use the kiln on my back porch or back yard, so I need a 240v outlet that I can run a long (~20 feet) extension cord out to the kiln. I do have a 240v outlet for my electric range that is in a wall that might be convenient for creating a 240v on the opposite side of the wall (which is on my porch-- ie. the wall separates my kitchen where the 240v outlet for the range is from the porch that I could run an extension cord out to the kiln). Any ideas? Of course it would a lot easier to just run an extension cord from the existing 240v outlet in my kitchen outside, it is just that I live in Minnesota USA and I am not sure how I would do this without leaving a door adjar and letting cold air in; or could I access the 240v circuit somehow from below the floor of the kitchen (i.e. in my basement) and then just run a line out from the basement?
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Just how many amps does that kiln need? I doubt if you can run that and your elect range off the same circuit. I also question the "extension cord" idea, however the answer to my question may get past that one.
Additional question, how many amps is that existing 240 outlet rated for? Do you have available space for an additional 240 breaker in your distribution panel?
If you don't understand all of this, I suggest calling in a professional, you are likely to get yourself into trouble trying to do it yourself. It is not really all that difficult, but the danger comes in when something is not as expected and due to lack of experience you don't notice it.
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On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 20:51:16 +0000, Joseph Meehan wrote: ,,

You are probably right. I surely do not want to electrocute myself or burn down my home! Any guess as to what it would cost to have a professional wire a 240 outlet?
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On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 20:51:16 +0000, Joseph Meehan wrote:

21 to 50 Amps, depending on the model of the 240v kiln.
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You will need to know what the max will be and wire for that. With 50 amps that means #6 wire. Hard to find extension cords with #6 and plugs rated for 50 amps. I strongly suggest hard wiring and no extension cords.
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Would the ratings have to be upsized 125% to account for a continuous load?
Nate
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I am not sure. Since the issue was extension cords, I am not sure my numbers are correct. I would have to look it up and I don't have that handy. I suspect someone has the info handy. In any case, I would not consider it myself.
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Some of the very small 240 V. Kilns use a 30 amp circuit. Most require a 50 amp circuit. You need to check the requirements of the kiln that you plan to purchase to determine what you need, if in doubt, wire it to handle the 50 amp load.
I would not even think about running it off of the same circuit as the range, and never run it off of an extension cord.
I ran wiring for a couple of these when I owned a ceramic shop about 20 years ago, and ran #0 wire. Can you imagine how hard it would be to handle an extension cord with 4 #0 wires in it? :)
Your best choise would be to hire an electrician to run you a new 240 v. circuit all the way from the box and have a dedicated breaker for the kiln.
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Your going to have to run a dedicated circuit for your kiln sized for the maximum amperage the kiln will draw (plus whatever margin code dictates). This could be anywhere from 50 to 80 amps, depending on the kiln.
Forget about tapping into the circuit for your electric range. With all due respect, the fact that you are even thinking about doing this leads me to question whether you should undertake this project yourself. I feel you would be best served by hiring a licensed and bonded professional electrician to do the job for you. Running one circuit like this won't be all that expensive and the piece of mind you gain by knowing the job is done right will be well worth the money.
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On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 21:57:55 +0000, Banister Stariwell wrote: .

Amperage will be between 21 to 50 Amps, depending on the model of the (240v) kiln. Hopefully this will not present a problem for an electrician to wire an outlet for.
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Are you even sure your range is serviced by 240v? (Mine isn't) You probably need an electrician to install a new circuit box and bring 240v service to your house. Then you can think about wiring an outlet. I agree with Banister. Remember that 240v can kill you.
good luck
Banister Stariwell wrote:

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What kind of a range do you have, or, where the heck do you live that it isn't 240v?

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If you are going to mess with 240 volts, get an Electrician to install the new outlet. Also, be certain to follow the installation instructions for the kiln to the letter. You won't want it near any flammable material.
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It's not particularly hard but to do it right you should add a breaker pair to your box and make it a dedicated circuit to the outlet. They have outdoor covers that will work on 220 too.

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Ranges are typically on a double 50 breaker. Your kiln probably needs a smaller breaker than 50 amps.
As for running an ext cord, it is physically possible, but it's not safe to run an extension cord off your range outlet.
I'd suggest call an electrician for this one.
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Beowulf wrote:

i would think twice about an 220 volt ext. cord... most electrical equipment will not work with extension cords(the metal in them is not thick enough... if you are using 10 ga. wire in the wall then you need a 10 ga. extension cord.. doubt you gonna get one and will only mess up your equipment........ i know with air compressors they tell you never to use an ext. cord, but to use a longer hose for the air... the reason is that you gonna get voltage loss with using an extension cord..... and this is with a 110 volt air compressor...if you get voltage loss with a kiln you gonna have to wait longer for it to heat up and its might not work correctly...
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People make a big deal out of 240v, but really isn't any more difficult or dangerous than 120v if done properly. Doing it properly is the key. Little things that might not matter at 1,800w (120v/15a) can be catastrophic at 12,000w (240v/50a)
You first have to find out your electrical requirements. You say it is 21a to 50a; well, it is very different running #10 for the 21a than it is running #6 for the 50a. Also you have to know if a neutral is required; I don't know why a kiln would need a neutral, but it might.
No way to price it on the internet; doing the panel connection and outlet (or direct wiring, whatever) is fast and easy. The slow expensive part is running the cable. That could take an hour or 20 hours depending on the route and the cable.
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In general, in North America, the electric service comes into the house in 3 conductors. 2 black, and 1 white. If you take 1 white and 1 black, they will give up 115V. If you take two blacks, they will give you 230V. Please take a volt-meter or multi-meter to test it out yourself.
Don't forget; Watt = Amp x Volt, therefore by increasing the voltage, you will require less Amp (means smaller breaker and lighter wire).

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