How does one drill a hole in a guardrail anyway?

Page 2 of 7  
On Sun, 2 Sep 2012 08:03:17 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

I suppose you mean FMJ (JHP is "jacketed, too";-).
In any case, be careful how you ask a question: http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pidC497/Bullet+Style_1084=Full+Metal+Jacket+%28FMJ%29/Product/WINCHESTER-RIMFIRE-AMMUNITION#skugrid

It would probably make a mess of the reverse side, too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 2 Sep 2012 05:58:26 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

A .22 would not even dent that material. I doubt any pistol would hurt it unless you have a "cop killer" bullet. Maybe a .308? If you have an AP round it would be a clean hole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 02 Sep 2012 14:48:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I think I could make a .45 caliber hole in that with a pistol.
Jim [if I had a pistol, that is]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/2/12 2:00 PM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

I think the OP could wait for deer season. Put up a dummy buck and see what happens. Would an 8 pointer be over doing it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dummy buck practicing hard cover? I think that's ammusing.
Concealment is essential. Cover is better. Tracers work both ways. 5 second fuses last 3 seconds. Battle radios aren't loud enough, and their range is about half mile short of reaching the fire base.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

I think the OP could wait for deer season. Put up a dummy buck and see what happens. Would an 8 pointer be over doing it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm awaiting the test results.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

A .22 would not even dent that material. I doubt any pistol would hurt it unless you have a "cop killer" bullet. Maybe a .308? If you have an AP round it would be a clean hole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 02 Sep 2012 14:48:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I .357Mag, or better, would probably do a number on it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

That steel isn't body armor caliber. I wouldn't trust it!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I wouldn't be shooting *at* it, either.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Not close up with a pistol, hell no.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I'd shoot samples of it at the range from 100 yards with a high-velocity heavy bullet (7.62), anything else I'd think would be unsafe unless you control the 'experiment' with remote firing with a string and some cover for ricochet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stormin Mormon wrote:

What?
You don't own a gun, and are advocating unsafe use of one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
True on both counts. Sigh. Well, it was a thought. Please forget I even suggested it.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Stormin Mormon wrote:

What?
You don't own a gun, and are advocating unsafe use of one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

From 50 feet a .22 will not even reliably go through an aluminum road sign, let alone a steel guardrail.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, in that case, nevermind. Better to stick to titanium drill bits.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
From 50 feet a .22 will not even reliably go through an aluminum road sign, let alone a steel guardrail.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 03 Sep 2012 08:31:51 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Titanium was exactly what I was missing!

The bit is a bit scratched up, but other than that, it's no worse for the wear!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/01/2012 06:49 PM, Smitty Two wrote:

As long as it is a HSS twist bit, it doesn't matter if you buy it from the big box; if he follows the rest of your suggestions it will work just fine.
The only thing I would add is to start with a smaller bit and work up to the size he wants.
Jon

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 02 Sep 2012 09:16:38 -0700, Jon Danniken wrote:

I picked up these from Home Depot today:

I'll start small ... and then work my way up to the size I need.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/1/12 8:41 PM, James Gagney wrote:

I'd probably just use a cheap ratchet strap or bungee cord to hold the can. Another thought would be an over door hanger of some sort. Would an animal feed bucket fit your needs? Or this http://tinyurl.com/9y3q846 ? It's supposed to hold a five gallon bucket.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Some sort of glue (RTV) comes to mind.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.