How does epoxy spray paint work, and should I paint at all?

For a long time I've wondered how epoxy spray paint works. I've used it and it is great, as hard as the paint that came on the washing machine in the first place, but I thought epoxies were those which mixed two ingredients at the time of use. Is that true? That doesn't happen in a spray can does it?
And... About 12 sqare inches of my washing machine has chipped off paint with some rust. It's not a removable part, and I can't take the washer out of the basement. I think I can paint it in 2 minutes of spraying, 12 or fewer 10-second sprays.
Would you be willing to do this in the basement? I could wear one of the good? masks, costs about 30 dollars iirc, that has a charcoal filter that absorbs vapors from paint, solvents, glues, thinners, and pesticides, it says,
AOSafety, model 95050. Do you think it's safe for 2 minutes. I only have 40 years left to live anyhow.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 05 Dec 2008 00:08:12 -0500, mm wrote:

You can do it without a spray mask. It's not that toxic.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<snip>
God bless ya, mm. I'm down to 30. It goes faster and faster doesn't it!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Well, i'll be lucky if I even have 30 years, but for medical purposes, I used 40, because that's the outside limit (101).
Still 30 is a long time, I think.
No one else has an opinion on the risk of using spray paint indoors? Epoxy spray paint!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mm wrote:

I don't know about epoxy, but it may not be the cure. If the paint is coming off due to rust from the inside, paint won't stick either. Twelve square inches of paint should not take more than a few seconds of spraying and for that minimal amount, I wouldn't bother with more than holding a wet cloth over my nose/mouth. Is the stuff flammable? You could also fashion a barrier around what you are painting with clear plastic and have nothing to inhale.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

All of this is moot because of your last suggestion, below, but I answered anyhow.
I don't think it is rusing from the inside -- it's still quite thick and strong -- but 'm not positive what the cause is. I think that because I occasionally dried laundry on the side of the washer, that is what damaged the paint. It's only in the front, and one place on the side. This is a on old whirlpool machine where the whole top lifts up (the lid is mounted to the "top"), and that piece is not rusty in the slightest. Only the front piece (and that one spot on the side), the piece that goes all the way to the floor, is rusty

I suppose. I haven't bought it yet. Even though I'm not going to spray much, and I don't think it will reach explosion level, I guess I should turn off the furnace until a while after I finish .I'll do that.

That is just a great idea. Great, great, GREAT. It will also keep spray from drifting onto everything else, which I didn't even ask about, because I thought it was hopeless and decided it was a burden I would bear. (There is little there to protect, but the overspray, even on a cardboard box would annoy me.) I've got lots of thin, transparent, plastic drop clothes. Maybe I'll hang the middle of it from the ceiling, and tape the sides lightly to the top and front of the washing machine. Thanks a lot.
If this works, I'll look for a job in a clean room, or doing semi- robotic surgery.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
clipped

You might want to investigate Preval sprayers, which are for using with your own paint. They are a jar with aerosol can attached, hold about 8 oz.. They are great for small jobs, have a more even spray pattern than some aerosol cans and you can use your own paint. I use them for craft projects, louvered doors, etc. I repainted our old range hood using Rustoleum primer and enamel. Paint needs to be thinned a bit, following label advice. The range hood looks just about like new. The spray doesn't drift much, but need to mask nearby stuff. I painted the hood in my kitchen, with brand-new kitchen cabinets right above. In case of runs, I keep a small foam brush wrung out with mineral spirits to catch runs before they begin to set. I have purchased Preval sprayers at HD and at paint store.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
clipped

I have a friend who worked in a van conversion factory. She told me about an employee there who worked in the paint spraying operation. That guy went out to the break room one morning, got his coffee, sat down and lit a ciggie. He set his clothing on fire, apparently from the paint fumes absorbed. All moved quickly, no serious injury.
I used to do my messy work late at night, after children were in bed. I was painting the kitchen and had a bad stain to deal with. I had a spray can of shellac-based primer that I sprayed liberally onto the stained ceiling. It was a very warm, still summer night. Windows open, no breeze. The kitchen was full of paint mist, very dense, when I remembered I had forgotten to extinguish the pilot on the gas range. My first thought was to run outside, but remembered sleeping family :o) I got under the plastic tarp on the range and blew out the pilot real quick. Didn't worry at the time about what I was breathing.
Later in the same project, I was trimming wallpaper around the wall switch for the lights. Utility knife hit the contact and burned a nice little notch in the blade. Fortunately, I think, I was wearing rubber gloves :o) I've learned a great deal from my mistakes :o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

>I thought epoxies were those which mixed two ingredients at the

There are "two-part" epoxy paints and "one-part" epoxy paints. The one-part usually do not "cure", they dry.
A two-part contains a moderately low molecular weight epoxy resin in solvent which you mix with an amine, also in a solvent. The epoxy and the amine react (at the job site) to form a crosslinked film. Crosslinked films can be made harder and more durable than non- crosslinked films.
A one-part epoxy is actually a high molecular weight, non-crosslinked resin manufactured by reacting a low molecular weight epoxy resin with bisphenol A in a chemical reactor.. The resins may or may not contain a small proportion of leftover epoxy groups. They may or may not be used in situations where one "cures" the leftover epoxy groups.
Once upon a time, when the earth was young and I worked with epoxy resins, they used high molecular weight "curable" forms in industry, and non-curable forms (no leftover epoxy groups) for sales to consumers.
The solid, high molecular weight material is dissolved in a solvent more or less like a lacquer. If no curing agent is used, the dried film is not crosslinked, and is not quite as durable as the cross- linked film resulting from a two-part epoxy. However, all epoxy based coatings tend to be very durable, a feature which compensates for their higher cost-of-manufacture.
Regards -J
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 7 Dec 2008 05:31:24 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

Well, no wonder no one else answered this part. Too complicated.
Thanks. I got most of it but I'll read it a second time after I read me email.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.