How does a wet cloth really help (scientifically) to survive an airplane crash?

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On Tue, 20 May 2014 06:55:42 -0700, Robert Green

Complicating are economic pressures: Plane failed == extremely costly liability. Pilot Error == no liability.
And from experience having a pilot friend accused of fuel exhaustion when it was a casting flaw in the carburator suddenly appearing where he was 'guilty until proven innocent'; you'll see more Pilot Errors causing crashes than mechanical failures.
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On Tuesday, May 20, 2014 10:30:52 AM UTC-4, Robert Macy wrote:

That's incorrect. The liability can be the same for either case. Who pays it would be different. But you're not trying to tell us that in all the cases of pilot error, the airlines and/or their insurance companies didn't pay out costly claims?

So you're saying the NTSB doesn't conduct full and fair investigations? I've yet to see or hear of a case where it looked like they came to a deliberate wrong conclusion blaming the pilots. The reason more pilot errors cause crashes is because it's more likely for a pilot to make a mistake than it is for a mechanical failure to bring a plane down. Often, it's a combination. Many times some minor mechanical problem that didn't directly affect the ability of the plane to fly, results in the crew then making some big mistakes that then result in the crash too.
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The guilty until proven innocent came from peers [because they know thst most accidents are caused by pilot error of some form] and by the plane's owners, not by NTSB, who actually did find the pinhole leak in the carburator. [substantiating your claim that the NTSB always conducts a thorough fair investigation]
Another anecdote: Ms and I watched a helicopter crash about two blocks from our building. Although there was a highly pedestrian populated area around the crash site, no one on the ground was killed due to some heroic flight maneuvres from the pilot who was killed in the crash. I got to talk with the NTSB investigator about a year later after he had filed his report and reached all conclusions and found out that his long time friend crashed due to fuel exhaustion - he purposely ran the helicopter lean in order to keep it light for the maneuvers. but severely misjudged. and acted to his own detrimant to save lives on the ground. And, died. The investigator was quite pale as he went into details, since this was a long time friend. Thus, here we have potential bias NOT from any financial pressures, but rather from personal loyalty pressures, which he did not succumb to. Again supporting your statement that the NTSB conducts thorough, unbiased crash reports.
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On Tuesday, May 20, 2014 2:51:21 PM UTC-4, Robert Macy wrote:

Maybe we're seeing different crashes. In all the cases I can recall, there really hasn't been any jump to conclusion by the media, those directly involved, etc to focus the blame one way or the other. After a plane crashes, I've never seen the aircraft owner start blaming the pilots. Not sure how that would help them either, as usually it's a commercial flight, and the aircraft owners hired the pilots and they are only going to make their own case worse. Can you give an example of where in a recent crash the airline blamed the pilots? Nor have I seen other pilots blaming them. The media reports the facts and they may have some discussions from "experts" about what something might mean, like say the tail being found 1/2 mile away from the other wreckage, but even then, from what I've seen, they are careful not to point the finger, to try to keep it as factual as possible. In the case of MH370 for example, CNN was all over the map 24/7, covering every possible aspect of it. And as facts emerged that pointed to it being deliberate, they did start discussing the clear possibility that it was a pilot that caused it, they also had Les Abend on there much of the time. He's a 777 pilot and editor of Flying Magazine. And all along, he insisted that he thought it unlikely that a suicide pilot was the cause, saying he thought it was likely mechanical, although towards the end, I think he started to allow thepossibility that it might be deliberate. Even in the case of MH370 as far as blaming the pilots, the closest anyone has come to that is the Malaysian investigators who said they believe that based on the known data, it was likely the result of deliberate human action. That still leaves the possibility of a hijacker, together with other even less likely scenarios, that don't involve the pilots.

I'm glad we agree on that.
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On Tue, 20 May 2014 09:49:57 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

Your attention please. The plane is on fire. The flight attendants will be passing out half-bottles of water to each of our passengers. Please soak your shirt in the water and breath through that. To learn if this is for hydrochloric acid or cynanide only, please consult our webpage, www dot flagrantairlines dot com slash airplane fires slash gases. If there are not enough half-bottles, you may use your urine, but please do not get any on the seat.
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Very sad that all those families do not have closure.

A sign of the 'end of times'?
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wrote:

etc
What are we doing here? Making a baby or a cup of ramen noodles?
--
Bobby G.



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