How do you "tune up" a hard-to-start Craftsman 18" chainsaw

Page 7 of 7  

On Thu, 19 Aug 2010 12:57:45 -0700, SF Man wrote:

I found a good video for tuning the Poulan Craftsman chain saw carburator:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Lw0pJcEPYo

I ordered the splined carburator adjustment tool so that I can adjust the non-adjustable California 'pins' for the Low and High settings. http://www.hyperparts.com/wc.dll?ctwp~iteminquiry~1001~1003~530035560
It's important to note that we need 92 psi in order for a 2-stroke engine to run according to the dealer I spoke with today so I'll also check the compression (I need to change the fitting on my compression tester which was for 70's model car spark plugs with a different thread than this chain saw).
Anything else you suggest?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Follow the steps in the video -- that was good. He tuned it by ear. I do this with all my small engines.
He suggested removing the muffler to check for scoring on the rings and piston. Unless you have piston, rings, cylinder damage -- chances are your compression is _good_. This is not an old unit.
Cross the state line into Nevada and adjust the carb, so you don't break the law <G>.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

== Following this thread is like following an action-packed soap opera. Will SF Man ever get his chainsaw to work?...stay tuned for the next episode.
Just kidding...keep at it. ==
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm also following. Good luck, SF man.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Aug 2010 10:27:46 -0700, Oren wrote:

I'm close to the Pacific ocean. I wonder how far I have to go out to be governed my international law. :)
I can't wait for my "splined" tool to arrive. The "pins" on the L and H carburator screws seem to be smooth but we'll see when the tool arrives.
It was a good suggestion to remove the muffler to check the rings; and the 92 PSI is a good idea to test compression also (although the Craftsman chainsaw is only 1 year old with only a few hours on it).
I'm beginning to hate Craftsman / Poulan ... by the way ... but I'll save the rant for another day.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Aug 2010 20:12:14 -0700, SF Man wrote:

Let us know what you eventually find out...
cheers
Jules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'm betting you could use a dremel tool and cut a slot in the heads of the screws. Then use a standard screwdriver. No?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The screws are recessed in a metal surrounding. It would be very difficult to do. I did talk to a couple guys who said they used those crimp-on wire connectors and slid them over. I tried that method but couldn't get it to work. Maybe I was doing something wrong. Anyway, my tool has paid for itself... $5.
Also on a side note to all that is following.........when dis- assembling something as complicated as a carb, or even something you have never taken apart, take pics of it BEFORE and DURING dis- assembly. By doing this, you won't be confused as to where that spring goes, where the linkage goes and etc. when you want to re-assemble it.
Hank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 19 Aug 2010 12:57:45 -0700, SF Man wrote:

Thanks for all the help you guys. This is my followup message.
I never could get it started. I brought it to an engin-repair shop and they just called to tell me it's unrepairable.
The compression was 50psi but apparently two-stroke engines need 90psi to start.
He said he removed the muffler and he could see the scored piston. I have NO IDEA why the Craftsman/Poulan piston scored after only a year of occasional use, as I have been the only use of the chainsaw and I never abused it.
Sears has a 2-year warranty but I'd have to find my receipt and they might say I neglected it (even though I can't imagine how I did that).
Next time someone can't start a two-stroke, one of the first things I'll ask him to do is check the compression and remove the muffler to see if the pistons are scored.
:(
PS: Any idea what to do with the now-useless chain saw?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Thanks for the follow up.

The video you found on youtube showed how to do this check. Did the shop charge you for this?

Lack of "enough" oil in the gas mixture? Always better for a little more oil and foul a plug than not enough oil.

If you bought it with a credit card, some cards give an additional warranty. I have a drawer in the garage for receipts and manuals. It's my go to place when looking for "papers"

Boat anchor? Or part it out and sell the parts!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had a guy bring me his 14hp Kawasaki mower that didn't run. He took it to the biggest small engine repair shop in Columbus Ohio. They told him his cylinder was scored and had low compression. They disassembled it and it was in pieces. Cost him $200. I looked and the cylinders were in great shape. I lapped in the valves and gaped them. Started first pull.
I suggest you get another opinion since you only used it occasionally. Many shops take in stuff and never even attempt to fix it, only to charge you a "diagnostic charge". I hope they didn't charge you.
Hank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd like you to ship it to me, so I can play with it. But, I'm guessing the postage would be a bit much. Post Office won't ship anything that once held gasoline. Have to be UPS.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, August 19, 2010 at 3:57:45 PM UTC-4, SF Man wrote:

I have a Model 358 352180 18" Crapsman chainsaw too and it will not even po p with primer. I have worked on small engines for years and this is the fir st one that stumped me this bad. I did find they had the primer hoses on ba ckwards and I corrected that but it has spark, compression and fuel and it should at least pop. The one last thing to check is the key in the flywheel . If that is sheared the least bit, it will not fire. If that is okay, the saw goes in the dumpster on trash day! I should know better than to buy new Crapsman power tools ..gas or electric!! They have gone way down hill sinc e the old days!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, April 27, 2016 at 4:08:58 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote :

irst one that stumped me this bad. I did find they had the primer hoses on backwards and I corrected that but it has spark, compression and fuel and i t should at least pop. The one last thing to check is the key in the flywhe el. If that is sheared the least bit, it will not fire. If that is okay, th e saw goes in the dumpster on trash day! I should know better than to buy n ew Crapsman power tools ..gas or electric!! They have gone way down hill si nce the old days!!
...I've never heard of a sheared key on a saw. Try a minute spray of carb c leaner down the throat of the cab...to see if it will pop. If it pops, get a carb rebuilding kit for it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 27 Apr 2016 14:08:54 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

There is a fuel filter in the gas tank. Check it...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 27 Apr 2016 23:08:47 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

You can get a carburetor for less than $30 and that will fix most of these hard to start, won't run problems. http://www.searspartsdirect.com/part-number/545070601/0071/358.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I suspect he's fighting an extremely lean condition . Kalifornistan has them set the damn things so lean they'll barely run , the cure is to open up the low and high speed needle valves a bit . The problem is that "they" don't want you to do that , so they make the adjustment screws so you need a special tool to adjust them . My solution (Ryobi weedeater) was to use my dremel with a cutoff wheel to cut a slot for a regular screwdriver in the head . Runs swell now ... but I still can't get the neighbor's Stihl to run right ...
--
Snag



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You say there is a spark, in the spark plug, or just from the wire going to the spark plug. Have you tried a new spark plug, they do crap out especially in 2-stroke engines which is what I believe you have in your saw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, August 19, 2010 at 3:57:45 PM UTC-4, SF Man wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.