How do you transition from hardibacker to sheetrock?

Do you tape the joint with joint compound or thinset?
Or should I just tile the entire wall in the shower area all the way up to the ceiling?
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On Oct 3, 6:08 am, poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

In my opinion, you should just tile to the ceiling. Mine isn't and if I redo it it will be, ceiling and all. Unless you have no water pressure, it will constantly get splashed, which will lead to, peeling or at least discoloration adding additional cleaning and painting chores. If the drywall ever gets soaked, (green board is water resistant not water proof) replacing it will play hell with the top row of tile. If you do decide to transition, do it above the tile for the reason stated above.
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On Wed, 03 Oct 2007 04:08:06 -0700, poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You can tile it all the way up if you like; probably easiest and most durable.
If you want to transition, here's what I do.
I plan the transition so it falls about 1/4 to 1/2 inch below the top edge of the top row of tiles. I just leave an open joint; no tape, mud, thinset, or the like. I then tile the area, being careful to hold the thinset back on the top row so the tile is only adhered to the backer board. Then instead of grouting the very top joint between the drywall and the tile, I use urethane or silicone caulk after the drywall is painted. This has worked very well for me.
HTH,
Paul F.
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wrote:

That sounds reasonable but I'm curious as to why you wouldn't put a little thinset on that small 1/2 inch section of sheetrock? I think the caulk at the top certainly sounds reasonable.
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On Thu, 04 Oct 2007 13:00:33 -0700, poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Anytime you have two dissimilar materials they are likely to move slightly relative to each other with changes in temperature and humidity. By not using thinset on the sheetrock edge, it allows for this motion. The caulk is flexible so it can tolerate the movement.
Is it a huge deal in this case? I doubt it, but it's easy to do and it's held up well for me.
Paul F.
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poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I used Wonderboard all the way to the ceiling, and skimmed it with "EasySand 120" setting-type joint compound from the top row of tiles to the ceiling.
It's too soon to tell if this was a good idea or not.
Bob
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Hi, I should have mentioned that the transition I need is on the wall on a vertical joint. Where the back wall of the shower ends one column of tiles goes beyond the shower door (outside the shower area) and then the sheetrock starts - all on the same wall.
I assume that this last column of tiles - under these tiles - the joint from hardibacker to sheetrock should be (outside the water area of the shower.)
The other side of the shower - the tiles end right at a 90 degree corner. So I'm guessing that I could use a corner bead over the hardbacker and sheetrock - use jointcompound on the sheetrock side maybe a little extra thinset on the hardibacker side and make everything flush. I'm sure it sounds easier than it actually is but I don't think it will be impossible.
Someone in the history of the world must have ran into this?
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