How Do You "TIN" a soldering iron?

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On 12/3/2010 6:13 PM, Tony Miklos wrote:

I love those vacuum desoldering stations, I had one sold by ECG back in the late 70's and like you said, a DIP chip would often fall out in your hand after sucking the melted solder off the circuit board. The ECG unit was affordable by just about any electronic tech back then.
TDD
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Good grief what a lot of posts, all about anything but what the OP asked as far as I can see.
To tin a soldering iron get a wet sponge.
Let the solder tip reach full temperature. They make little trays with sponges in them just for ths purpose at Radio Shack & other electrical supplies & box stores.
Wipe the hot tip on the sponge, moving it fast enough to not burn the sponge (the water makes it easy) & dislodge the oxidation.
If a wet sponge doesn't work well enough, it might be necessary to gently scrape the tip with a knife or any blade, held at right angles to the tip. Then a few swipes across the sponge again on the tip, and it should take a tin nicely.
It's in "good shape" when resin-core solder covers the tip in a nice, usually shiny coat of solder. Shake off the excess solder. Done. It'll do a much better job of transferring heat to whatever you are soldering if the tip is clean and tinned. Many people get the little tray with sponge and set it near the work so if/when oxidation starts, a wipe or two on the sponge will renew the tinning quickly.
Ths same informatioin is available many places on the web; especially soldering tutorials.
HTH,
Twayne`
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Uh, the boiling point of HCL is (at most) 230F degrees. Wouldn't it boil away on a soldering iron?
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wrote:

And if it doesn't, it is just concentrated. By your logic, acid core solder should work just fine??
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On 11/29/2010 10:41 AM, homer wrote:

I forget what it's called, but I have some kind of ammonia block that I sometimes rub the tips on. Not sure if that is what you mean?
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On 11/29/2010 11:23 PM, Tony Miklos wrote:

It's called "sal ammoniac".
TDD
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On 11/30/2010 1:04 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

WOW!
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On Tue, 30 Nov 2010 00:23:04 -0500, Tony Miklos

That would be the stuff. Not the best idea for electronic soldering because of the hydrochloric acid that co-exists with the ammonia, and is the active material involved in removing the oxide scale from the copper.
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On 11/30/2010 1:39 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

No problem, most of it gets scrubbed off in the 2nd step with the brass wool anyway. And I have seen hundreds of cases of my soldering on circuit boards 15-20 years later and there has been no problems.
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On Tue, 30 Nov 2010 09:58:33 -0500, Tony Miklos

That's because YOU know enough to finish the job with that step two - wet spong or "kurly kate"
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On 11/28/2010 11:26 PM, B_ snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

If you're not doing domestic plumbing, (and you wouldn't be with a soldering IRON) then get you some REAL solder. Then file the tip shiny whilst cold, then heat it and stick it in some solder paste, THEN the REAL solder will flow on to it quite well. If the tip gets too hot and/or oxidized, you'll never get it to flow properly.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
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On 11/29/2010 12:26 AM, B_ snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Start with Google and search for "how to tin a soldering iron".
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On 11/29/2010 12:26 AM, B_ snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

This is plumbing solder, get some designed for electrical. Something fairly small. 60/40 tin/lead (or is it the other way). Use the right solder for the application.
If you have trouble tinning it is either because you can't get the solder hot enough or the tip is not clean enough. Sounds to me that you are using the wrong solder, too large and wrong type.
I always just used a damp folded up paper towel to wipe the tip. You can sand or file the tip if you need to get one more use out of it, don't otherwise.

I heat the junction and feed in the solder at the junction, not on the tip. But close to where everything meets.
I was in the electronic repair business just about forever. I wound up soldering stuff I could barely see (SMD LSI) even with reading glasses!
Jeff
The wire should get hot and soak up the solder, right?

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wrote:

This 95 SN 5 SB stuff may be the European solder. From what I have read they have gone lead free in the electronics soldering. Also you are not suspose to mix the two when repairing the equipment as they do not work well together.
I don't even like that sn/sb for soldering pipes. I still have a couple of pounds of the 50/50 tin/lead solder for my pipes if I need it.
About 30 years ago my wife and I were watching tv about the moonshine makers. They mentioned the lead in the pipes and I told here one day the trr huggers would say not to use the lead solder in the pipes. Sure enough , they have.
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On 12/1/2010 10:32 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Moonshiners were/are using car radiators to distill their product which was imparting all sorts of toxic substances into their mountain dew.
TDD
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wrote:

Not necessarily true - the lead free solder madness has hit electronics like a frieght train. ROSIN CORE solder is NOT plumbing solder.

Lead free electronic solder is a royal pain - period.

The wire should get hot and the solder should wick up the wire. Putting the solder at the junction of the iron and the wire - or on a printed circuit, more correctly at the junction of the pad and the iron, enhances the heat flow. When the solder wets the pad, you slide the iron against the component lead, and the solder should very quickly wet the lead as well, forming a smooth fillet from the pad to the component lead (or wire).
I know Smitty will likely argue with me, but tough.
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On 12/1/2010 5:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Lovely. Looks like I got out of the repair business in time.
ROSIN CORE solder is NOT plumbing

You are right, I missed that.

I imagine!

FWIW, I'm with you on this.
Jeff
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Lead-free solder isn't required in the US, yet. There is still plenty of leaded stuff around.

The big problem is that it's impossible to tell if the joint is good. They all look cold. It's a good excuse to get our technician to do all my soldering now. ;-) <snip>
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On Thu, 02 Dec 2010 18:25:07 -0600, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

It IS required if the device is assembled with lead free - the two don't mix very well.
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On Thu, 02 Dec 2010 22:07:07 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Bullshit. Leaded solder works just fine with unleaded parts. Better, in fact, because you can use lower temperature. The parts, and tools, will be "contaminated" but that doesn't matter for US consumption.
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