how do you suggest cutting a round hole in existing ceramic floor tile

I'm in need of a six inch round hole in ceramic floor tile for a cook top vent system. It is under a cabinet so neatness or exactness is not critical. I only have one to do so would rather not invest a lot into it.
Is the dry diamond wheel on a grinder the best way to go or are there better suggestions?
Thanks for your input.
Ted
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bear wrote:

That'll work, but...(there's always a "but", isn't there? :) )
What size/type of tile? If it's completely hidden as you say, the quick 'n dirty to just break out a tile at the grout line via cold chisel would suffice, too. (I know, you want "neat", too...)
--
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bear wrote:

I would use a 1/4" carbide masonry drill bit to "swiss cheese" the circle. Drill some more holes to make an "X" in the center and then a small chisel to break out the pieces. Far less dust than a grinder and little cost.
Jim
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I'd just use a chisel on the tile. -----
- gpsman
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On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 07:40:24 -0700 (PDT), bear

I have seen China made carbide tipped hole saws of various sizes including 6 inch. They are a must to cut holes in granite countertops. Perhaps you can rent one. But a stitch line of 1/8 drill holes made with a masonry bit is still the easiest way to go.
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on 4/21/2008 10:40 AM bear said the following:

One of the ads for the Rotozip saw has it cutting a hole in wall tile. Perhaps it will work on floor tile as well.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Hey thanks to all for the great suggestions. I bought the 4 inch diamond blade for a grinder but the idea of drilling holes interests me. I may just try that first as the diamond wheel can always be returned.
I thought about trying to use a chisel and break it but the hole must cross two 13 tile and although it will be hidden by the cabinet, it is within about 4 of the cabinet edge and I worry about cracking the tile where it is exposed.
Bill, I have a rotorzip with the bit for tile but it is not recommended for floor tile. I tried it but came to the conclusion that at my age I would be gone before the hole was finished.
Again, thanks to all for the suggestions.
Ted
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clipped

Just out of curiosity, why is the hole planned so close to the edge of the cabinet? Can you not put an angle on the exhaust to move it over? I would be concerned about cracking the grout joint in addidtion to cracking the tile, and with possibly sacrificing two tiles rather than one.
We have tile put down by a wonderful contractor. Where the tile surrounds railing anchors, they cut the tile in half, cut half the hole in each half, and then laid them such that the cut is invisible. It would be worth contacting a contractor ... probably have the tools and practice to do the job.
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Thanks again to everyone for your suggestions and comments.
I tried drilling holes with the masonry bits but they did not work, at least mine didnt. The diamond wheel worked great and was fast.
Norminn, the hole is 3 from the edge of the cabinet and was placed in that location to permit as much room in the cabinet as possible. It is a small island with a cooktop grill and my wife wanted as much storage as possible in the cabinet.
I build custom cabinets and furniture and also do some metalwork so have a shop full of tools.
Thanks again.
Ted
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re: " I tried drilling holes with the masonry bits but they did not work"
I bought a glass/tile-cutting bit at Lowes when I had to drill the anchoring holes for a pedestal sink. It wasn't the Kobalt brand shown here, but it was the same "arrow head" style bit.
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=280526-68081-82724&lpage=none
I kept the tip damp and it went through without any problem - I took my time, but it worked fine.
Buy a single tile of the same material if you want to try it out before climbing under the cabinet.
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Diamond wheels on grinders are incredibly useful. Keep it.

Use the angle grinder to cut a straight line across the tile under the cabinet, then chisel out what you don't want.
R
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In my experience most floor tiles are so hard that masonry bits and non-diamond tools will not work reliably if at all.

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The bit used on a Roto-Zip isn't really strong enough to go through the much-thicker floor tile. I know from (unfortunate) personal experience. What I would recommend is using a 5" diamond-edge circular saw to cut a square hole 6" on a side. If your personal saw isn't powerful enough, rent one from the local tool rental shop. Believe me, it's worth the investment of time and money. It will also make the cleanest cut with the least chance of cracking or otherwise damaging the tile beyond the cut area.
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