How do you stop a fresh water spring from running???

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I'd be thinking of call several building contractors near you, and see what they say. I'm guessing this has happened before. On the bright side, you've got a source of water if the municipal water fails.

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Before undertaking some major earthmoving/ remedial measures, it might be prudent to get advice from a geologist familiar with the area. There is a possibility that the entire neighborhood is underlain with a network of (small) interconnected and shifting aquifers. If so, the remediation will be best accomplished by diverting the flow at the highest point of the tract. IIRC, water flow of this sort is sometimes found in old glaciated areas, moraines, whatever. Fascinating problem...
Joe
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On 12/2/2011 7:14 AM, busbus wrote:

Talk to the inspector fella. He may be more interested in allowing a remodel of the sidewalk and curb with the addition of a nice little sign showing the spring as the head waters of "such and such" river. Our city has just such a sign at a dry ditch stating it as the head waters of the Deep Fork which ultimately gets pretty big.
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First thing, look at the overall lay of the land. Water will flow downhill but also sink into the soil. If it reaches any depression that will accelerate sinking into the soil.
Water getting into the soil causes springs.
You want to eliminate depressions and add drainage. Places where the water leaves the soil and gets to the surface to run off will help. As long as it's not your driveway or sidewalk.
I live on a street called Springridge. As the name implies there are lots of springs. Every house has a pipe running through the curb to the street surface. This is for sump pumps and gutters.
If you're going to break through the curb you're going to need a permit. It's not like that can be hidden.
Good luck.
--
Dan Espen

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busbus wrote the following:

You don't say where you are located, but here in the NE where we had a lot of rain this summer and an early heavy wet snow that caused a 3 day power outage taking out electricity, cable TV and internet, and the phone lines. The streams and rivers are still running higher than normal. At my house, there is an aquifer that is very near the top of the ground and runs under my asphalt driveway. It caused a lot of damage to the driveway after an extended period of rain or by snow melt, i.e. the driveway looks like it was built using jigsaw puzzle pieces. The water seeps out of the cracks in the driveway for a couple of days after a heavy rain. My driveway is even with the ground at the house end, but cuts deeper into the ground as it goes down some 90' to the street level where it is about 5' below ground level, as is the street. In case anyone is wondering, the driveway was built correctly by a driveway company, including sub-grade materials. The highway department installed a leech pipe under the driveway at the street end to protect the street from damage, but that doesn't help me.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I live in southwestern PA. We had a really wet spring this year and a lot of late snows. It has been a pretty wet autumn, too.
I think I will still have the water company come out and see what is happening first. I suspect they can quite easily tell if there is a leak in the yard. I understand what somebody else said here that it could still be a water main break because of the ground will soak up the water whenever it is really dry.
I still do not think it is the sewer line because the flow is CONSTANT.
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There has been no answer given to your question.
The answer to the question is "pressure grout the stream". http://www.chemgrout.com / The answer to your problem may be more complex. Consult a drilling firm and seek that professional's input.
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rcb

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Turn the world upside down.
Make a channel with a waterfall and goldfish and little china scuptures of boys fishing, etc.
Bottle it and sell it.

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