How do you remove an Interior sliding cavity door


I have a door to my laundry room that recedes in to the wall cavity. It is hangs from two brackets that have wheels attached and slide on a rail. One of the brackets is loose and the door no longer slides. I con'y figure out how to get it off the rails and out of the frame with out removing the molding. Any one know if this is the right approach?
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Maybe try lifting it out of the bracket that runs across the top?
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remove it bottom first
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Try googling How to fix pocket door if no one here can help you out.
nancy
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Thanks, I wondered what their familiar name was
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Some have accessible screws to control the lift required to make the door lift out. On those you just mis-adjust until you can lift it ouit.
On MANY others, the facing must come OFF first.
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The pocket door should be smaller than the doorway opening without the stops installed. See here:
http://daveosborne.com/newsletters/images/pocketdoorstops.jpg
The stops prevent the door from swinging when the door is closed. Pry out the stops carefully, then you should be able to tilt the door into one room, lift it off the track, and down out of the doorway.
... of course, depending on your door, you may be able to adjust it in place.
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lilfella wrote:

Yes. Remove molding. Normally, just on one side is all that is needed.
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lilfella wrote:

Those are called "pocket doors", and boy need the asme advice and aven't found anything.
I was told that 6 8 10 years ago "Ask This Old House" did a story on pocket door repair, but I've never been able to find a copy of that isode.
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I've never seen a pocket door that could be removed without removing the molding, on top at least.
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I've repaired two of these pocket doors recently.
Examine the carriage at the top of the door. It is likely two pieces, with one part screwed to the top of the door and the other with wheels riding in the rail. Here's an example: (Amazon.com product link shortened)- HANGER-19mm-dia-WHEELS/dp/B0006FLJHM/ref=sr_1_14/103-3566072-2228610? ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid77953212&sr=1-14
The part on the top of the door has a peg that fits into a hole in the upper part, then is secured by a sliding plate. Most likely, the sliding plate has slid back to the "disengaged" position, allowing the parts to separate.
The fix is to jiggle the door until the post slides into the hole, then levering the plate back into position.
1) Use a small lever on the floor to move the door up and down with your foot. Two small pieces of wood will do.
2) Use whatever screwdrivers will fit to position the carriage over the pin.
3) Press up HARD with the lever to get the pin to seat.
4) Use the screwdriver to move the plate into position. Try not to scratch the door. This is the hardest part, because the plate fits tightly.
This will go easier with two people, one person with three hands would be better.
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