How do you drill through stainless steel at home?

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Then your original description of the desired outcome was incomplete / inaccurate. :(
You do not want to merely "hang the opener". You want it to be available for use AND you want to make sure it doesn't "leave". A different set of constraints.
Sounds like you need a lanyard system or a system to "train" the kids.
You have an amazing ability to complicate the simplest tasks and cause threads last a very long time.
I can only wonder what the next "hidden constraint" might be.
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not true...think outside the box
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Industrial quality drill. The consumer ones are all a piece of sh*t.
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On Thursday, March 7, 2013 4:46:00 PM UTC-5, Danny D. wrote:

Since it's steel, could you mount a magnet somewhere and just stick it to the magnet?
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On Thu, 07 Mar 2013 18:33:43 -0800, Pavel314 wrote:

Is stainless steel magnetic?
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Some is , some is not.
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On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 21:46:00 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Titanium is nice, but it's the steel under it that makes the difference. Use cheaper cobalt drill bits instead. Be prepared to re-sharpen the drill quite often. You can also use a carbide tip bit, which is even harder than cobalt steel. A concrete drill with carbide inserts might work if you keep it cool. Unless you're really careful, and have the parts bolted down very well, the slightest bit of side play will break the carbide drill.
Feeds and speeds: <http://www.carbidedepot.com/formulas-drills-speeds.htm

It's probably work hardened stainless 300 series stainless. Find a magnet and see if it's magnetic. If it's been work hardened, it will be slightly magnetic. If not, it will be non-magnetic. If it's very magnetic, it will be 400 series stainless (contains no nickel).
<http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID 40> The last time I had to drill through work hardened stainless, I destroyed two small drills getting a start. So, I took a piece of hard steel drill rod, with a squared off end, dumped some carborundum abrasive compound into the hole, and intermittently ground my way through the hardened stainless. You can go through glass with that technique. I don't recommend doing this as it took forever and I had to grind flat and reharden the drill rod every time it got hot, but eventually, I had a hole.

Ummm... this doesn't really belong in sci.electronics.repair.
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Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
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JUNK!
http://www.rodmanandcoinc.com/rodmanandcoinc.com/item04c5-2.html?UCIDs=1
First, they are what we called "brass bits". This is cuz they are ground with a reverse relief angle on the cutting edge. Rodman calls it "special negative back grinding". Bottom line, it purposely dulls the drill bit by preventing a good sharp cutting action, which is how a drill bit works. But, on some metals and plastics, a sharp cutting edge is not good. It can violently grab the material and rip it out of yer hands or a not-so-secure clamp and/or sometimes breaks or crack the material. Brass and plexiglass are good examples. Gotta use brass bits, or yer gonna bleed. Rodman bits might be good for those two materials and probably wood. Useless for drilling steel or alum.
The other giveaway? "Chrome Vanadium Steel" Any metal drill bit made of CVS is a piece of crap. Probably great on wood, but will be dull junk before it drills its 2nd metal hole. You want HSS (high speed steel) drill bits. Nothing less for metal work.
nb
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On Thu, 07 Mar 2013 19:08:10 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Hi Jeff, Interesting diagnostics. The flat part (where I don't want to attach a cord) is slightly magnetic. The cylindrical handle (where I do want to drill) is not magnetic at all.

I had not realized how hard stainless steel is!
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On Fri, 8 Mar 2013 16:28:36 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Both parts are the same material, probably something in the 300 series. The flat part has been stamped or punched, which work hardens the part, and produces the slight magnetic effect. Nothing pounded on the handle, so it's not magnetic.

Hardly and that's NOT your problem. Trying to drill a rounded surface directly is going to cause a very different problem. Visualize what a cross section of the contact area at the round stainless handle and drill interface. The only point of contact is at the very tiny tip of the drill, where there's no cutting edge. You can spin that all day long and never get the drill bit to cut any metal.
Take a bench grinder and put a flat area where you want to drill. Grind or punch a starter hole. That will give the drill bit cutting edge something to bite into. After that, you should be all right.
Incidentally, you haven't suffered until you've tried to machine titanium.
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On Fri, 08 Mar 2013 09:07:27 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Hi Jeff,
Up until you said that, I had simply assumed it was two different components. Looking closely, and snapping a picture in the sunlight, now I'm not so sure. It just might be one piece!
Here is a large photo of the junction between the flat & the round:

Small photo of the same thing:

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On Fri, 8 Mar 2013 17:38:39 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

It's two pieces with a tack weld at the joint. You can see the puddle of metal in the photo. Also notice that the polishing marks are in different directions on the two parts.

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Jeff Liebermann Inscribed thus:

Now now... He definitely doesn't want to do that :-(
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On Fri, 08 Mar 2013 09:07:27 -0800, Jeff Liebermann

Try tungsten, if you like challenges.
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croy

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On 3/7/2013 9:23 PM, Steve B wrote:

Yes, to the Rodman bits. Guaranteed for life. I've had a few replaced. I only use them for special problems, but they have always worked.
As to drilling stainless, any good HSS (high speed steel) bit is capable with slow speed and high pressure. The bits may not last long, but should be able to cut. I agree with the comment about needing to get the cutting lips of the bit engaged.
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On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 21:46:00 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

For the best outcome you need to use the best drill bits available to you, cutting oil, low RPM, and high pressure. If you can get cobalt drills then get them. I noticed that my local hardware store is now selling split point drills. If your store carries these then use one. They also probably sell "Threading Oil". Get a small can of that. If the store cuts to length and threads pipe then maybe you can talk them out of a couple ounces of the oil they use in their threading machine. Get the dark threading/cutting oil. It will have sulfur in it which is a good high pressure additive. Don't make the mistake of using motor oil. A good cutting speed for a 1/8 drill is about 700 RPM. Keep the pressure on the drill so that it is constantly making a chip. If the drill stops cutting the SS will work harden which just makes it that much harder to drill. When you feel the drill start to break out of the back side of the part ease up on the pressure so that the drill bit doesn't break. It would be good if you can back up the part with a piece of mild steel or aluminum. This will help by keeping the drill bit from feeding too fast and breaking when it exits the back side of the work. Eric
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On Mar 7, 10:08 pm, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

Yes, That's my experience, slow and steady and make sure the bit is always cutting!
George H.
When you feel the drill start to break out of

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"Danny D." wrote:

news:rec.crafts.metalworking would be a better place to ask. (Added)
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wrote:

That's a hell of a can opener if it's 1/2" thick! Might be lassoing it with a lanyard would be a better way to go.
Stan
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On Fri, 08 Mar 2013 07:27:30 -0800, Stanley Schaefer wrote:

Yeah, it's a doozie (for a can opener)!

I bought it at Bed Bath & Beyond for $4, hoping to lanyard it outside. It's too smooth to just tie a cord around the handle.
And, it's not magnetic & therefore very hard to drill with my vanadium-coated (brass color) steel drill bits:

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