How do we transport a refrigerator across state?

A good friend is giving me her refrigerator, which I desperately need. She lives 200 miles from me. How do we move it without damaging it? It has to say upright, correct? I don't have the money for a new fridge and would like to move this as cheaply as possible while still assuring it's safety.
I'm thinking these are my options: 1) I can put a hitch on my SUV (I need one anyway for a bike rack I have) and get a little Uhaul trailer to pull it but I'm afraid of it tipping over and of the vibrations and jolting it will get in a trailer over such a distance. 2) I could rent a regular Uhaul truck...do you think that would be better in terms of stability (less bumping up and down in a bigger vehicle vs. a little pull trailer)? 3) We could lay it horizontal in my husbands little pick up, if that upright thing is an old wives tale. 4) I could hire an moving person (who has insurance) to do it.
Please, ANYTHING you can share on how to move a good size refrigerator without damaging it would be most appreciated!
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Well, you should keep it upright if possible, if only because the back is fragile and the cabinet is easily scratched, dented, and so on. Just wrap a tarp over it and tie it SECURELY in an upright position in a front corner of the pickup bed, and then drive sensibly. People do this all the time. Nothing will tip over. For that matter the trailer wouldn't tip either. Don't worry about the bouncing etc (unless you have to drive 200 miles on a county road in western New York, in which case you should look for a refrigerator closer to home). If I were you, I would make sure the sucker works well before hauling it that far. You would feel pretty foolish if you got it home and up the steps and in the kitchen and THEN found that it was defective.
I'm not sure this necessarily makes economic sense anyway; 400 miles at 18 miles per gallon with gas $1.50 plus tolls if any is like $40 and a day's time. If you rent a trailer, your mileage drops and the rent will push you close to $100. You can probably buy a used one locally for $100. On the other hand, this may be a really good refrigerator; if you have to rent a trailer, though, it probably isn't worth it.

She
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Yes, it is a really nice side-by-side refrigerator, good brand name, nice features, only a few years old and works fine and is free to me for the transportation. You must be familiar with western ny...it will be going from Corning to Rochester area on Rt. 390, 490 mostly. There's always road work (esp. 390 - never a smooth ride in parts) and bumps along the way, but no country roads. Thanks for the advice.

safety.
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better
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One more thing, perhaps if you mention your location and where the fridge is, you might, just might find someone that has a truck and is traveling your way from there, or close, and would move it for you for a little bit of change, vs your other options. I cannot speak for the group, but I live in the Dallas Area, and am always looking for an excuse to visit my buddy in Houston and get a little fishing in. I would probably move it for you for gas money + a case of cokes.
You never know, it can't hurt to ask.
Maury Wylie, TX

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Don't worry about the bumpy ride or even sitting on its side. However after either set it up in position and let it stay there for 12-24 hours before turning it on.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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On 04 Jul 2003, HvacTech2 wrote:


...and that's how "old wive's tales" are perpetuated.
TP -- _________________________________________ If u are gonna say that I said something, please say what I REALLY said. ($1 Earl)
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This is turtle.
When they wrote it on the box this side up. they have a arrow pointing to the up side. Tom just puts that side that the writting on up. Then it ends up with the unit laying on it's side.
TURTLE
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Hi,
Some "can my fridge be moved on it's side" helps.... http://www.applianceaid.com/faq-side.html
jeff.
Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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nospamplease wrote:

Don't see what your problem is. (forget the trailer, the UHaul, or a moving person) Your husband has a small pickup. Everything I've read says you can lay it on the side or the back. Are the coils showing, if so don't lay it on the coils. But, if you don't believe that laying it on it's back or side is ok, then why can't it sit upright in your husband's small pickup. If you can beg or borrow one of those upright moving carts and strap the refrigerator to it and leave it strapped for the entire trip. Turn it sideways to increase aerodynamics; wrap it in blankets, a quilt, etc.; and rope if sideways and endwise so it does not move (do not use flexible tiedowns). Drive slowly (50 mph). Let it sit for 24 hours before operating after you get it into position. So, it costs $20 each way (assuming 15 mpg) and it takes one day. Don't think that is much for a good refrigerator and not likely that you can get a good refrigerator for that amount and that little work.
Second best bet is a small UHaul Truck and rent it for the day in the town where you live (and don't say anything about driving to another town). Check with the dealer on the best deal, weekend or weekday. Good Luck.
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In alt.home.repair on Sat, 05 Jul 2003 05:03:10 GMT "George E.

That part is really good advice. Never moved a fridge, but moved two pianos, one at a time, on the back of my Catalina convertible. Spinet and other upright pianos are supposed to be moved upright (Grands are to be moved on their side), to avoid breaking the sounding board. These were only 200 dollar pianos, but I didn't want to break them. You definitely don't have to be this cautious for a fridge.
I put a double bed mattress on the trunk and the top area, and laid it on that and tied it to the bumper and the top mechanism. I only had to go 20 or 30 miles, but I drove at 5 or 10mph over really bad bumps, and up to 30 the rest of the time. Driving slow gives you time to slow down when you see a bump.
Put your 4-way flashers on for the construction part and drive at 20 or 30 if its bumpy.

Meirman
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She
to
over
in
upright
You're making a mountain out of a mole hill here. The easy and obvious option- which for some reason you're not considering-- is transport it upright in your pickup truck. If it's a large refrigerator, rent an appliance dolly and get a couple of big guys with you to help hump it around. Make sure you tie it down well in the truck.
Red
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