How do we know when 120V US socket strip can handle Europe 240V?

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On 5/19/2014 1:15 PM, TimR wrote:

Didn't know that and thanks for the info. Although I carry the lamp socket adapter when I travel to Europe, I've only used it in U.S. bargain motels that sometimes provide few if any convenient sockets. However, if I need to use it in Europe and it doesn't screw into the lamp socket, I'll know why. I have used the single plug adapter - extension cord connection many times in Europe with no problem at all for camera battery chargers, tablet chargers and dual voltage electric razors (the latter when the hotel room's razor outlet was non-functional).
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That might be a good idea.
I'm assuming you mean one of those all-in-one things with three or so 2.1 amp USB ports plus three or so 3-pronged outlet receptacles.
That might work, but a lot depends on the geometry because non-USB chargers and cpap have to get plugged into it.
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On Mon, 19 May 2014 02:54:45 +0000 (UTC), "Geoffrey S. Mendelson"

The "problem" that will be multiplied is the fact that none of the american spec dual voltage adapters will fit the euro power bar - meaning the OP needs to buy numerous plug adapters or new power supplies. Think about what the poor guy is trying to do before answering the question.......
He has a mumber of chargers/adapters with parallel blade (american 15 amp) plugs that are rated for 85-250 volts, 50 /60 hz and he wants to use them on a trip to europe. What is the easiest, simplest, cheapest way to do it??? Buy one adapter from the local (2 round pin) 240 volt connector to the 15 amp american blade style plug, to connect a 120 volt power bar to the 240 volt sourse, and then plug all of his existing "universal" devices into the power bar. MOST surge protected power bars clamp at 300, 400, or 500 volts. If it is a 300 volt clamping surge protector the 340 volt peak to peak voltage could blow the MOV. If it is the much more common 400 volt unit, there will be no problem, and of course the 500 volt unit will also have no problem. Units with more sophisticated filtering than MOVs may have a problem - but virtually all regular, cheap, power bars only have 400 volt MOV protection.
This has been done by hundreds and thousands of travellers for decades, without serious consequences.
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On 5/19/2014 8:27 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Well stated.
The bottom line is that a 120V outlet strip will work fine at 240V. The surge protectors won't blow at 240V. If there's a neon lamp pilot light in the switch it _might_ blow because the series resistor is too low of a value, but no harm will come from it blowing.
Personally, I like the universal power strips that will accept all plug types such as <http://www.110220volts.com/PKT-8D.html .
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"sms" wrote in message

Are you certain? The peak voltage of a 240V line is 340V. If the surge protectors are 300V...
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On 5/19/2014 3:22 PM, William Sommerwerck wrote:

That's possible if they cheaped out on the surge suppressors. Most power strips use MOVs that won't clamp until 340V.
I guess it's a better idea to buy a power strip rated at 240V since you'll have more margin. Or buy a 120V power strip with no surge suppressors.
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wrote:

But a waste since he does not need to be able to plug any euro plug devices into it, and he STILL needs the plug adapter because it comes with the American style 15 amp parallel blade plug........
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On Mon, 19 May 2014 08:19:45 +0000 (UTC), "Geoffrey S. Mendelson"

It won't be HIS disaster. Anyone stupid enough to plug their stuff into his power bar without asking deserves what he gets (it will only kill the device, not the owner)
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Any "expert" who says it is two phase is no expert.
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wrote:

Because half of what he wants to run isn't 5 volt (usb)??? I have several 3 volt, 9 volt and 12 volt devices, not to mention 19 , 24, and 31.
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wrote:

An e26 will always fit an e27 socket. An e27 can be a "tight fit" in an e26 socket. In the "real world" I think we in North America often end up with e27 sockets regardless.
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On Monday, May 19, 2014 6:01:49 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I asked out of experience. I have an E27 fixture, a German pole lamp, that will not work with some brands of E26 CFL. They don't seem to make enough contact. Other brands do work. These same CFLs start fine in an American pole lamp.
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wrote:

There are 3 types of MOVs used in most power strips (and other surge protectors) - 300 volt, 400 volt and 500 volt The 400 volt are by far the most common. The 300 gives better protection on 120 volt circuits, but the 400 is most common and adequate on 240 as well. Particularly in the cheap Chinese stuff it means they can use the same devices world wide.
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** What I wrote is correct.
The strip will *handle" the same current so the power capacity will double.

** Really - the *same* devices ??

** Only be true for wide range SMPS ( ie 90V to 260V) and those devices that can be switched to 240V.
.... Phil
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"Phil Allison" wrote in message

** Really - the *same* devices ??

** Only be true for wide range SMPS ( ie 90V to 260V) and those devices that can be switched to 240V.
Yes, Phil. We know that, Phil. That's what we were talking about, Phil. [Pats Phil's pate patronizingly.]
For someone named Phil, you certainly show little love for other people.
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** Your words are the subject here.

** It is wrongly worded and misleading, for anyone except maybe a Canadian.
.... Phil
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Not always true. With a linear supply it would be true, as the different transformer windings would both convervt the voltage down to the same low voltage.
Switching supplies are not all the same, and some just convert the incoming power to 400Hz (or higher) AC,run it through a transformer and reduce it to the outgoing voltage with a regulator. If the device is plugged into a 120 volt socket, the output voltage of the transformer is 15 volts, if it is plugged into a 240 volt socket, it would be 30 volts.
The internal regulator would even it out.
Current draw would be the same.
Geoff.
--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, N3OWJ/4X1GM/KBUH7245/KBUW5379


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"Geoffrey S. Mendelson" wrote in message wrote:

Not always true. With a linear supply it would be true, as the different transformer windings would both convert the voltage down to the same low voltage.
Switching supplies are not all the same, and some just convert the incoming power to 400Hz (or higher) AC, run it through a transformer and reduce it to the outgoing voltage with a regulator. If the device is plugged into a 120 volt socket, the output voltage of the transformer is 15 volts, if it is plugged into a 240 volt socket, it would be 30 volts.
The internal regulator would even it out. Current draw would be the same.
I don't think that's correct. To (possibly over-) simplify things, at higher line voltages, the pulse width will be narrower, and less charge will be drawn from the filter caps. Ergo, less current will be pulled from the line.
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On 20/05/2014 07:09, Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:

That would be really dumb. The power supply would run really hot on 240V and nice and cool on 120V.
In fact the converter you describe that generates the higher frequency AC will be adjusting itself so that the transformer output is more or less the same voltage no matter what the incoming mains voltage is.
--

Brian Gregory (in the UK).
To email me please remove all the letter vee from my email address.
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On Tue, 20 May 2014 06:09:46 +0000 (UTC), "Geoffrey S. Mendelson"

Reguardless - they will never draw MORE current from 240 than they would on 120 - so current capacity is never going to be an issue - and MOST will draw less current on 240. One of the advantages of switch mode power supplies is higher efficiency.
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