How do we know when 120V US socket strip can handle Europe 240V?

Page 2 of 4  
Jessie Williams wrote:

I am in Israel and we get all sorts of tourists and immegrants, bringing all sorts of plugs, outlet strips and devices.
The Israeli standard is 230 volts, 50 Hz single phase. EU standard is also, but there is enough variaition allowed that the UK 240v power grid and the continental 220v power grid is within the specified 230 volts.
In my experience, the best thing to do is to what someone else already said, buy high quality plug adaptors and use them. If you need an outlet strip, buy one locally.
You should have no trouble finding them, unless you arrive at 3am Sunday and all of the stores are closed. :-)
Avoid the real cheap slide on 2 pin adaptors that are sold in travel stores, airports, etc. They have a bad habit of sliding off as you unplug the plug, leaving 230 volts exposed on the bare metal of your US plug.
The good adaptors look like cubes and will accept many different plugs, including a US grounded plug. Unfortunately they do not always carry ground. They need a fair amount of force to remove a plug.
Bring a roll of electrical tape, If you have to buy the slide on adaptors you can tape them on so they don't slide off. Crude, but a lot safer.
Geoff.
--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, N3OWJ/4X1GM/KBUH7245/KBUW5379


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 18 May 2014 17:48:00 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@spambog.com (Wolfgang Allinger) wrote:

do not have exposed metal parts. (wall warts)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

"cheap" adapters in europe you don't know what you have. (and you end up with another pile of crap to store when you get home. The single plug adapter is the lowest cost solution, and the least duplication (which is why I have used it several times, and my daughter has used it on her African sojurns - without any problems.
On the cruise ship I didn't even need the plug adapter as the plugs were "universal" - took american flat blade as well as euro round pin plugs - but all 240 volt only.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 18 May 2014 23:24:46 +0000 (UTC), "Geoffrey S. Mendelson"

the power bar. Get one that has the sideways plugs to accept numerous wall warts side by side.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But, a local outlet strip will just multiply the problem in the wrong direction, won't it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

** Huh ?
Same current, as that rating depends on cable and conductor thicknesses.
.... Phil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What he's trying to say is that when a device is switched to 240 volts, it draws only half as much current as it does on 120V.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The only thing to really worry about is any over-voltage/lightning/surge pr otector built into the power strip. Remember, 120V AC is really 170 volts peak, double that for 240V AC. Then you have to find out what the surge pr otector guarantees. The surge protector rating also assumes a certain sour ce impedance, relatively high compared to the impedance of the raw voltage that will be introduced by a direct connection to the power mains.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jessie Williams wrote:

It sounds ok until someone accidentaly plugs in a 120 only device without looking.
Geoff.
--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, N3OWJ/4X1GM/KBUH7245/KBUW5379


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 19 May 2014, Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:

then he has to get the pin adapters for each of the AC adapters he plugs into it.
He wants to buy one set of pin adapters, for the powerbar, then the North American power bar will take all his existing ac adapters, "solving the problem". Since they are North American, he needs the powerbar to plug them into, but since they are switching supplies and apparently are all able to run on 240V, they will be fine in Europe.
Michael
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 18 May 14 at group /sci/electronics/repair in article N8OdnbJTgKwv_-TOnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com

Not likely in Europe, the hot is 220..240V to the neutral. Not the american crap 2x 120V 180°!
Saludos (an alle Vernünftigen, Rest sh. sig) Wolfgang
--
Wolfgang Allinger, anerkannter Trollallergiker :) reply Adresse gesetzt!
Ich diskutiere zukünftig weniger mit Idioten, denn sie ziehen mich auf
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/19/2014 12:31 AM, Wolfgang Allinger wrote:

Yah, European 240 is single phase and one of the experts here says American 240 is 2-phase.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/18/2014 10:15 AM, Jessie Williams wrote:

It will be much less current so it will work fine though if there's a lighted switch it may not survive the higher voltage.
You could also just buy a universal power strip, i.e. <http://www.dx.com/p/2500w-4-outlet-ac-electric-power-bar-strip-w-individual-switch-led-indicator-ac-250v-3m-cord-103853 and put the proper plug on it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Michael Black wrote:

That's relatively easy. Any hardware store, electrical store, DIY store, etc will have them for about $2-$3 each. Here in Israel, they were $5 each until we switched from 3 rectangular pins to 2 or 3 round pins on all our plugs and sockets. The same adaptors can be used for the old plugs to the new sockets and everyone needed lots of them and they went down in price.

It will be fine until someone sees the outlet strip and thinks it is 120 volts and plugs in a 120 volt only device. I expect that a single person, staying in single bed rooms will be ok, but anyone traveling in a group, sharing their hotel room, or staying in a hostel is heading for disaster.
Geoff.
--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, N3OWJ/4X1GM/KBUH7245/KBUW5379


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"William Sommerwerck"

** It's more than mildly hysterical watching an autistic pedant pretend he has a superior "theory of thought".
When the damn fool has none at all.
..... Phi
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/19/2014 04:45 AM, Phil Allison wrote:

Why not just take a single USB powered hub?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good! You're finally learning to be self-critical.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/18/2014 3:57 PM, Jessie Williams wrote: ...

I've given you the link to the UL-listed solution.
The answer is that you _won't_ find an "ordinary" power strip w/ 125 VAC US plugs that says it will handle 250V because the US plug of that configuration is only UL-rated for 125V by US convention/code.
It is against NEC Code to use plugs for other than their rating; hence manufacturers are _NOT_ going to market any device that doesn't conform to NEMA/NEC/UL for the purpose. That means that any device w/ a 125 VAC plug style in the US will be marked for 125V only. End of story.
<http://www.nooutage.com/nema_configurations.htm#NEMA%20Configurations Now, we're back to the previous discussion -- is breakdown voltage in practice greater than rated and does the device in question contain a protective circuit that will "blow" when hit by the over-voltage and if does, are you comfortable using it?
See other responses for my take on that one. I come back that if you're not comfortable and not knowledgeable enough to be able to determine the answers, use the approved route of the multiple-outlet adapter strip showed previously or similar.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/18/2014 1:15 PM, Jessie Williams wrote:

Many overseas hotels have few if any outlets. My wife and I use two different dual voltage custom battery chargers for our cameras and two dual voltage chargers for our tablets. Therefore, I need 4 plug adapters (and 4 available outlets) to charge all 4 devices at the same time. I've started traveling with 1 plug adapter, 1 six foot 16 gauge 120v extension cord with an unpolarized plug at one end and an unpolarized triple socket at the other end, along with an old fashioned screw-in lamp socket adapter that has a 120V plug socket on each side before terminating in another lamp socket. I'm prepared for whatever I find in the hotel room. The current the 4 devices draw is so low that I'm not worried about overloading the 120V adapters and extension cords with 240V service and on 3 recent trips, I haven't had a bit of trouble with arcing and not a trace of warmth anywhere along any of my 120V attachments. Obviously this setup is not to be used with hair dryers, travel irons, or other devices that consume more than a few watts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, May 19, 2014 10:01:50 AM UTC-4, Peter wrote:

Has your screw-in lamp socket always worked? US lamp sockets are E26, European are E27. That's only a mm off, and I've had them work interchangeably, but I've also had them not work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.