How Do Reindeer Fly?

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The season is here to contemplate how reindeer fly. The article below seems to make more sense than most I have read, but I actually thought that since the middle of the 20th century, the reindeer flew based on electronics, mechanics, hydraulics, computers, power cells, and other modern marvels. What do you think?
This is a SERIOUS matter, for fun and the season.... Be creative!!!
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From: http://science-at-home.org/how-do-reindeer-fly/
How Do Reindeer Fly?
by Deb on December 13, 2010
There is a very good reason Santa lives at the North Pole – that is the native habitat of the Flying Reindeer, Rangifer tarandus volaris. Without these unique creatures Santa could not make it around the world to deliver presents. While there are many flying animals who could help Santa pull the sleigh, reindeer have the advantage that they are already well adapted to extreme cold because they live in Arctic regions. This allows them to fly very high and take advantage of the thinner atmosphere to go quickly. Lift
The Flying Reindeer have co-opted normal ruminant anatomy to achieve lift. Ruminants like cows have four stomachs to help them break down reindeergrass and especially cellulose. However, in areas where reindeer live they have had to switch their diet because of the very sparse vegetation. Much of Scandinavia was covered by glaciers in the last ice age which scoured away the arable soil, leaving very old crystalline rocks. These rocks support lichen, the main diet of the reindeer. The lichen is also breaking down the rocks, which contain many mineral deposits including iron, copper, nickel, zinc, silver and gold, and the reindeer eat large amounts of metals along with their normal food. Metals react with acid, including stomach acid, to produce hydrogen gas, and when they want to fly the Flying Reindeer collect and store this gas in another of their stomachs which is able to greatly enlarge. Hydrogen is of course lighter than air, and allows the reindeer to lift in the same way as Zeppelins did. Movement
Once in the air, the reindeer need to move forward. They do this by taking advantage of a cold weather adaptation, their thick fur coat. The Flying Reindeer have developed the coat on their legs to be extremely thick and long, with dense matted inner fur and long smooth guard hairs as an outer layer. This configuration allows their legs to act as oars or paddles and they can ‘row’ through the air. lichenLight
The Flying Reindeer has another advantage for Santa, although technically it is not the reindeer but their food. Many of the lichens the reindeer eat are phosphorescent, which means they glow in the dark. In winter reindeer find their food by using their noses to push aside the snow covering the lichens. This means they are rubbing their noses across the lichen and many small glowing particles get stuck to their nose and muzzle. The effect looks as if their nose is glowing and allows them to see at night.
So now at Christmas you will be able to keep a lookout for Santa and his Flying Reindeer, carrying him quickly and safely around the world, and know how they are doing it.
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Reindeer fly because **I** will them to fly. 'nuff said.
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On Sat, 12 Dec 2015 14:47:15 -0800, "taxed and spent"

So, by your nym, you are also now 'flaccid'.
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On Sat, 12 Dec 2015 15:51:32 -0600, Paintedcow wrote:

At this moment in the article, I was *sure* there would be an explanation about the evolutionarily advanced rocket propulsion system of the Flying Reindeer. Turns out, they just float.
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On Sat, 12 Dec 2015 23:09:40 +0000 (UTC), Aleksandar Kuktin

I wouldn't think they could move fast enough just paddling their legs... After all, they have to stop at every house on Earth in 24 hours. That's a lot of miles and stopping time too. I also think they have a powerful rocket engine in use, and also have some sort of GPS locator as well as an elevator powered with hydraulic cylinders which allows Santa to quickly drop down a chimney, deposit the toys, grab some cookies and get on to the next location.
On top of this, there has to be a computer which has an extensive database listing the names for each home and all the children who live there, which quickly identifies what presents go to which home, based on some sort of alpha-numeric code. Then the computer highlights each and every present with red and green LED lights, so Santa can quickly grab-and-go.
Additionally, they have to conserve energy to keep going, so I'd suspect that Rudloph's nose is LED powered, has a reflector, and uses a powerful red laser light to see ahead of them, when they encounter areas of fog and clouds. I'm still wondering what type of batteries are in use, and whether they have some sort of online generator which is wind powered as they propell thru the air. Obviously they cant use a solar charger, although they may have developed some sort of lunar charging cells.
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On 12/12/2015 07:28 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:
[snip]

They're now using a variant of the Bistromathic drive. The impossibilities involved have become Somebody Else's Problem.
BTW, It's interesting to find further information on this. I won't spoil your fun.
--
12 days until the winter celebration (Friday December 25, 2015 12:00:00
AM for 1 day).
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On 12/12/2015 02:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

I have no experience with reindeer but I can attest when you nail a whitetail center mass with a Kenworth doing 65 mph, it flies.
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wrote:

I read that and was thinking is it a Kenworth rifle? Bow? Special hunting round? I never heard of any such products. Then when I saw 65mph and remembered you drive some long haul routes I realized it was Kenworth, the truck.
My MIL was driving in NJ when a deer leapt out from the side of the road, tried to jump over her car and put an hoof through the sunroof about 6" from her head. Low flying reindeer trying to evade radar I guess. (-: Scared the bejesus out of her.
I hit one on the Pacific Coast Highway near Big Sur in a rented Jaguar. When the tow truck operator arrived two hours later, he berated me for not having hoisted the deer up and dressed it. I told him I left my buck knife and deer hoist in my other suit. He told me a lot of people hit deer on that highway and then take a rough ride down to the Pacific Ocean when they lose control of the car. It was pretty odd because I was the only car around when the deer burst out of the underbrush and right in front of the car. Must have been a kamikaze. Never had time to even hit the brakes. Learned that the chrome grille of the new Jags is just chromed plastic and shatters like glass.
The Budget rent-a-Jaguar people were very nice about it because I had paid the exhorbitant damage insurance fee ($12 a day). I had to settle for a replacement Mustang convertible and learned what happens when you drive up the California coast for three hours on a sunny day in a convertible with your arm out the window. The worst sunburn I ever got on my left arm. Got a pretty fair burn on my scalp, too. The real insult is that that it wasn't really warm enough to drive with the top down but I had a new convertible, damn it, and I was going to take advantage of it.
--
Bobby G.




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On 12/12/2015 09:17 PM, Robert Green wrote:

They're suicidal. The one I hit was on I94 near Miles City, MT. Eastern Montana can be summed up by 'ain't nothing there'. Except the deer. I saw him crossing the eastbound lanes and when he got to the median strip I thought it was just another deer crossing the road. His timing was perfect; he turned around and threw himself in front of the truck. I didn't even have time to react.
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On 12/13/2015 12:23 AM, rbowman wrote:

I bet a few choice words flew out of your mouth, tho!
--
Maggie

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On 12/12/2015 11:41 PM, Muggles wrote:

"Sorry, Bambi." The Kenworth was old enough it had a real steel bumper. The bumper got bent a bit but a come along and a light pole at the Miles City truck stop got it pulled back from the tire.
The newer trucks, like the newer cars, are all plastic until you get to the cab. They don't hold up too well in deer or elk encounters.
fwiw, the company put those deer whistles on all the trucks. In my experience they are 100% ineffective.
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On 12/13/2015 2:16 PM, rbowman wrote:

I often wonder if animals like that actually have a death wish.
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Maggie

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wrote:

Some of them seem really stupid, but others seem quite smart. During our recent hunting season, I never saw so many deer in town. It's just a small local town, but people cant hunt in town and it seemed that the smart deer took refuge there.
The High School football field was covered with deer one night when I drove past it. There were so many deer, I parked the car to watch them. Of course, I was waiting for one of them to make a touchdown :)
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the

Stories like yours and mine make me wonder whether the deer are rutting and think they're going to butt heads with this strange shiny creature invading their territory. There are just too many tales of "it came out of nowhere and smashed right into me!"
Of course, sheer stupidity could be the answer but they do seem to pick their targets. Mine was on me so fast I didn't even have time to utter "Oh shi+!" to myself.
--
Bobby G.



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On 12/13/2015 06:04 AM, Robert Green wrote:

Could be. It hasn't been a problem here yet but over in Helena (MT) the urban deer started to get aggressive enough the cops started trapping and eliminating them. Over here they're just picturesque. Last weekend I took a walk around town for a change of pace. As I passed one house that was half a block off one of the main drags I caught something from the corner of my eye and thought it was a Christmas creche decoration. When I looked, it was four deer laying there in the front yard chewing their cuds and watching cars go by. This was just a regular house on a city lot with a small yard, not a McMansion on five acres and was about three eights of a mile from the open hillsides around town. There was enough snow on the sidewalk that after I saw them I could see where the deer were roaming around the whole neighborhood. A friend swears he was driving up a busy four lane road and saw a deer stop on the sidewalk, look both ways, and cross when it was safe. Maybe it's jsut their country cousins that are stupid.
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On 12/13/2015 06:04 AM, Robert Green wrote: <stuff snipped>

I guess they smarten up *some* living near urban environments, the operative word being "some." Here near DC there are many, many animal rights activists who fight any sensible attempts at deer control "hoof and claw." My in-laws in NJ report much the same problem (that's where the sun-roof deer attacked). I think the last do-gooder plan was to sterilize the females with darts. Not sure where that one's sitting. I am hoping when the populations reach scourge levels they'll finally get around to offing them After all, we have some honor to preserve - it's taken us eons to become the apex predators of the world. At least racoons respect that and try to keep everything on the down-low. The local band comes by at 3AM every trash day and if you've got something they want, they're getting it.
--
Bobby G.




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On Sunday, December 13, 2015 at 8:06:07 AM UTC-5, Robert Green wrote:

Two lane country road, just after sundown. I was doing about 50, towing a trailer. I saw the buck come out of the woods on the left, maybe a quarter mile ahead and hit the brakes as safely as I could, looking out for the doe. Yep, here she comes, I'm still OK. Anymore? Yes! There's a young one. Braking harder now, keeping it straight, still OK...keep going kid, keep going. Oh Crap!
Just as the babe was clear of my van and on the right hand shoulder, she decided to turn around and go back. Anti-locks chattering, trailer pushing me forward. Caught her with the driver's headlight. She had cleared the van once going left to right and almost cleared it again going right to left. Almost.
I pulled over, went back, dragged her off of the road and collected some of the parts from my van. My van was drivable, so I got back in, called 911 just to let them know what happened and where. They took my info and I continued on my way. $2,500 worth of damage.
I wonder what mom and dad thought when they heard the noise.
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<stuff snipped>

trailer. I saw the

the brakes

still OK. Anymore?

OK...keep going kid,

decided to turn

Caught her with the

almost cleared it

The suicide gene at work! I seriously wonder what she was thinking with the danger already behind her to turn back? Fear of the open highway?

what happened

damage.
Ouch! They can really rack up the bonus bucks on their way to Planet Deer Heaven. Sunroof Deer cost almost as much. Your incident reminds me very much of the time when I saw a recap break off a truck rim several hundred yards ahead. I tracked it, watched it bounce - was sure to avoid it when another car hit the tread shred two lanes away and rammed it right into me.
I guess the lesson is to just pull over and stop but all the racing driver interviews I hear say it's better to steer out of trouble than brake out of it. I think it really depends on the trouble. That deer family was out to get you, I have no doubt!
I wonder if eventually deer will no longer be famous as being frozen in headlights because all the deer that *did* freeze in headlights got hit and failed to procreate? Surely you've enter a vote in the "don't turn around suddenly" gene pool.
But the deer have earned that reputation. Unlike lemmings and the shock of Disney's film makers faking the suicide deaths of all those little critters. Methinks they got a bad rap. Not so with the deer. My FIL had a prized garden ravished by deer who managed to get through the fencing and meshwork to do their evil deeds. He hated them until the day he died for taking a single bite out of every vegetable, ruining the entire crop.
--
Bobby G.




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On Wed, 16 Dec 2015 22:22:25 -0500, "Robert Green"

The solution is to put night vision sunglasses on all deer, with a strap behind their ears to make sure the sunglasses dont come off.
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I think the worst mess I've seen was a horse that got hit. Parts and pieces were scattered for maybe a quarter mile if I remember correctly. Deer seem to stay in one piece at least. Hitting a bull would be quite a deal.
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