how do I wire my shed for electricity?

I just need maybe 2 electrical outlets out in the shed, for running overhead flourescent lights, radio, occasional power tool. I could do without it, but it'd be nice, especially since i have bad eyes and need decent lighting. Do I need to run a circuit from the fuse box out to the shed? Or should I tap into an electrical outlet we have on the outside of the house? Also, when I run the electrical wire out to the shed, I assume it'll be automatically grounded -- from the main fusebox's ground? Thanks.
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It's probably best to run a dedicated circuit from the panel. If the shed isn't to far away You could run 12-2 UF cable and be sure to use GFCI outlets at the shed

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If you are doing only a couple of outlets, one GFCI will protect outlets downline meaning it has to be the first outlet wired from where it comes in the shed. The pkg insert should describe this in text and a diagram.
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Local inspector will determine this but even if not required, while doing "nice" things it may be nice.

Again, find out from local inspections how deep it has to be and if it has to be in any conduit.

If wired to a breaker at the box and bare wire is wired to ground, yes.
If tapping into an outside outlet is permitted and you tie the bare to the bare in the outlet box and the outlet box bare is actually tied to the panel box ground, yea....if that's what you mean by automatic.
BTW, that outside outlet should already be a GFCI by code. I would think the shed would then be automatically GFCI if tapped to the load side of the GFCI. I do not know if the run length from the GFCI outlet to the shed has an effect on the protection. Here is the insert that comes with Leviton GFCI's:
http://www.leviton.com/acenti/installation_sheets/Installing_Testing_GFCI .pdf

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faq at: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/electrical-wiring/part1 /
JDL wrote:

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wrote:

Without seeing your setup [meaning this isn't a HOW-TO], I would suggest a few things.
Put in a small load center. Here is my thinking, if you are working at night, and you overload a receptacle, it is better to trip a breaker there, and seperate from your lights. This is a safety issue, as well as a convienence. Keep your lights on. :)
Remember, follow local and national codes. I can tell you check 2005NEC Table 300.5 for your minium dept requirements for laying underground cable. If you farm/till/garden, you need to think about increasing your dept beyond the shallow depts allowed for certain installations.
Most importantly, since we cannot see your setup, so this is just guessing, drawup what you want to do(map, shed position, and house on it), and get your local code enforcement person involved. Becareful, if you have an older house, some local codes might require upgrades before new installations are made.
Good luck and keep us in formed on your success.
imho,
tom @ www.NoCostAds.com
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