How do I use an impact wrench

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How do I use an impact wrench?
Which way should it turn when I'm compressing it if I am about to to use it to unscrew a bolt or screw? Which direction are you looking from it? :)
If I push the front of wrench back into the back of the wrench it turns either clockwise or counterclockwise, when looked at from the heal of the wrench, depending on the setting. (The opposite of course when looked at from the tip of the wrench)
Which way should it turn if I want to use it to unscrew a bolt or screw? Which way are you looking from it? :)
I'm trying to unscrew the screws holding on the oil filter of my recently acquired 69 Honda, not run for 35 years. Also the starter motor cover. So I can clean and oil them respectively.
I have this problem every time I need to use this wrench and I figure it out, but since I'm over 50, or maybe since I was 20, I can't remember from one time to the next! This time, I think I have it, but none of 5 screws will budge!
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BTW, I've alread put liquid wrench on days ago and again yesterday, tapped all around the secrew heads each time.
The impact wrench fits perfectly into the 3 oil filter screw slots (Phillips) and pretty well into the other two slots.
I could heat these screws with a propane torch, but <sheepishly> I don't want to change the finish on the oil filter (aluminum, maybe), or burn off the paint on the starter motor cover. Will the propane torch do this, and will it help much to get these screws out?
I'm willing to wait until the engine is running and the parts are hot to clean the oil filter -- I plan to change the oil a second time after 3 or 4 hours of use -- but I would like to oil the starter motor before I try to use it. The kick starter doesn't seem to engage, and I'm hoping some hot oil will free that up too, so I think I really need the starter motor for a while.
How do I use an impact wrench?
Which way should it turn when I'm compressing it if I am about to to use it to unscrew a bolt or screw? Which direction are you looking from it? :)
If I push the front of wrench back into the back of the wrench it turns either clockwise or counterclockwise, when looked at from the heal of the wrench, depending on the setting. (The opposite of course when looked at from the tip of the wrench)
Which way should it turn if I want to use it to unscrew a bolt or screw? Which way are you looking from it? :)
I'm trying to unscrew the screws holding on the oil filter of my recently acquired 69 Honda, not run for 35 years. Also the starter motor cover. So I can clean and oil them respectively.
I have this problem every time I need to use this wrench and I figure it out, but since I'm over 50, or maybe since I was 20, I can't remember from one time to the next! This time, I think I have it, but none of 5 screws will budge!
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1969 Honda? You are going to need to remove the clutch and carefully separate the plates which are all very stuck together. Resist the temptation to try and unstick them by coasting and dumping the clutch while in gear. That will cost you a transmission rebuild.
CWM
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You're right about that. 3 points. Thanks for the warning.

Another guy told me that he frees it up by just pulling the clutch in and rolling the bike forwards and backwards a few feet. That sounds a lot gentler than what you told me not to do. Do you think that would be safe for the bike?
If not, can I get to the clutch just from the side, to the side of the clutch cable, which is where one of the clutch adjustments is?
Are there only 2 clutch plates?
I have the owners manual, but don't have a shop manual and don't know where to get one for something this old. And I didn't think I would need one just to get it running again. It ran when it was parked.

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I don't think that will work, especially after 30 years. There are multiple plates, and at best you will free one, and at worst you will clean cogs off of some gears. It really needs to be taken apart, separated and cleaned properly.

There's a whole bunch of alternating metal plates and friction plates.

There are aftermarket shop manuals from publishers such as Clymer. Usually not very expensive. You can also check your local library. They often have a collection of these.
To be honest, after sitting that long, I'd be tearing it down and checking for rust inside before I ran it. Carbs are probably gummed up as well. That was a Loooong sleep.
CWM
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wrote:

Dude Either you're a troll, or a complete idiot. (or both) Put the tools away before you kill yourself or someone else, or destroy something. You are not capable of SAFELY using tools. The only tools you are (hopefully) capable of using are your yellow pages and telephone. Look under "Auto Repair", then call a mechanic !!!!
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On Fri, 22 Sep 2006 00:22:11 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@ISP.com wrote:

LOL!
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BTW2. I meant to hunt in Google first**, and I should do that myself, so don't be nice to me and look for urls. I'm doing that now.
It's just that I thought you might know the answer right off the bat.
**I forgot and posted here first because it's a nice day and I'd like to clean the oil filter and refill the oil before it gets dark. I'm running almost an hour behind because when I drained the oil, it overlowed the drain thing, and spilled all over the sidewalk. I soaked most of it up and have to wash the sidewalk now!
mm
-------- BTW, I've alread put liquid wrench on days ago and again yesterday, tapped all around the secrew heads each time.
The impact wrench fits perfectly into the 3 oil filter screw slots (Phillips) and pretty well into the other two slots.
I could heat these screws with a propane torch, but <sheepishly> I don't want to change the finish on the oil filter (aluminum, maybe), or burn off the paint on the starter motor cover. Will the propane torch do this, and will it help much to get these screws out?
I'm willing to wait until the engine is running and the parts are hot to clean the oil filter -- I plan to change the oil a second time after 3 or 4 hours of use -- but I would like to oil the starter motor before I try to use it. The kick starter doesn't seem to engage, and I'm hoping some hot oil will free that up too, so I think I really need the starter motor for a while. ------- How do I use an impact wrench?
Which way should it turn when I'm compressing it if I am about to to use it to unscrew a bolt or screw? Which direction are you looking from it? :)
If I push the front of wrench back into the back of the wrench it turns either clockwise or counterclockwise, when looked at from the heal of the wrench, depending on the setting. (The opposite of course when looked at from the tip of the wrench)
Which way should it turn if I want to use it to unscrew a bolt or screw? Which way are you looking from it? :)
I'm trying to unscrew the screws holding on the oil filter of my recently acquired 69 Honda, not run for 35 years. Also the starter motor cover. So I can clean and oil them respectively.
I have this problem every time I need to use this wrench and I figure it out, but since I'm over 50, or maybe since I was 20, I can't remember from one time to the next! This time, I think I have it, but none of 5 screws will budge!
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On Thu, 21 Sep 2006 16:13:26 -0400, mm wrote:

Push the button toward the socket end to tighten. Push it to the rear to remove. Push forward on, push back off.
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On Thu, 21 Sep 2006 20:33:41 +0000, RLM wrote:

Did you mean an impact "driver"? Push in on the driver and twist in the direction you want the screw to move. Lefty loosey, righty tighty. Then hit it with a hammer.
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I guess I did mean a driver. Sorry, and I appreciate the repost. Let me try it and get back to you.
P.S. This accounts for why all my hits in google were were electric impact wrenches! :)
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OK, I think that's what I've been doing, but tomorrow I'll only try it one direction! (I tried a bit in the other direction when I got frustrated.)
I think we're talknig about the same thing, but just in case, I found a picture of another brand that looks much like it. http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/shop/LIS-29200.html
I think Don is talking about the same thing too, and that his instructions are the same, although this one doesn't really click or ratchet. It has two positions, left and right (but I haven't been sure which is which) and will go from one to another if you twist while pushing in.
Thanks to both of you.
Googling for impact driver still gave mostly impact wrenches, especially cordless. Those probably work great for bolts, but won't work at all I think for screws. It's the fact that the hammer is hitting it and moving it towards the work at the same time that torque is applied that keeps the bit in the slot. Yet based on the number of hits, these don't seem very popular. Googling for 'impact driver' 'ace hardware' lowes 'home depot' 'harbor freight' gave hits but none were this manual driver.
They must not sell many of these things
(I included harbor freight expecially because it has the included instructions as a downloadable file for, I think, everything they sell.
Adding 'manual' didn't help, and gave me references to instruction manuals, but not for manual impact drivers.
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Lefty loosey, Righty Tighty.
In other words, as you look at the head of the bolt, turn it left, or counterclockwise to loosen. Clockwise tightens.

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wrote:

I know that. (I've known that since I was 6**.)
It's how to get the impact driver to go that way when I hit it with a hammer! :)
**Maybe younger, now that I remember playing with my big brother's Erector Set.

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bit), turn the driver hard left (counterclockwise) until it clicks around in that direction. While holding the driver tightly in this manner (like you are trying to loosen the screw) hit the top of the driver. If you need to repeat, just be sure you have the driver clicked counterclockwise and put as much turning force on it as you reasonably can while hitting the end. You have to be trying to turn the screw when you hit the driver for it to work.
Don Young
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the tool. When you hit it with a hammer, it turns one direction or the other without regard to the tension you put in either direction, or none at all. The advice to put it on a hard slick surface, like a tool box, and press on it, is a good way to see which way it is going.
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while holding CW pressure or no pressure on it. My Snap-On driver has no CW or CCW markings or settings, you just turn it the direction you want the screw to go and hit it. Maybe others are different.
Don Young
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direction it is going too. I'm just saying that if you have it set for CW, even if you are putting pressure on it in the CCW direction to loosen a screw, when you hit it with the hammer, it will turn CW, tightening it. You can't overcome the direction it is set necessarily.
Mine is always set for CCW, since I have never used it for, nor have I found, reverse thread screws, so I don't have to remember which way it is set.
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wrote:

This one doesn't say CW or CCW, but it does say R and L, but there is no real indication if it is set for R or L, no dot on the other half.
So what about which direction one turned the part to get there? The problem was that it wasn't loosening, so I wanted to do the thing where you push it in while pressing against a smooth surface (although I just held it in my hand) and see which way it goes. I thought I had it right, but it DIDN'T work, so I started to have doubts.
The UPSHOT OF ALL THIS IS THAT IT DIDN'T WORK UNTIL I GOT OUT THE PROPANE TORCH AND HEATED THE CASE BEHIND THE HEAD OF THE SCREWS.
I got the first two, the cover plate for the starter motor out easily, but still needed to hit it with the impact driver.
The 3 for the oil filter, which turned out to have barely any dirt (oil paste) in it anyhow, each took about 2 to 3 minutes with the torch, mostly around the case and a little on the screw head.
And I've gotten one of the clutch cover screws out of 4 out, and need to get an extension to reach the other 3. Harbor Freight has a set very cheap.
I may also need to take off the right side cover, if the kick starter really has a broken spring or something inside.
The JCWhitney ad for impact drivers mentions striker plates, motorcycle cases, and body panels, so motorcycle engine cases are right up there in the list of things hard to take apart. I wasn't sure I needed this thing when I bought it (for 10 dollars) maybe 20 years ago, but it's good.

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I got mine for removing Harley case screws many, many years ago. It will help loosen the screws if you hit them several times fairly hard with a punch and hammer. If the slots are worn, you can use a flat punch to force them together a little and then drive the bit back into the slots. This will tighten the fit and will often ease the tension and corrosion enough to free stuck screws.
Use an extension that is as short and fat as possible to maintain the impact shock effect. A long slender extension will greatly reduce the effectiveness of the driver.
Don Young
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