How do I stop door from swinging open (or closed)?

Several of my interior doors, instead of staying in whatever position I want them in, will swing further open or closed (unless of course they're closed all the way).
Are there any simple remedies for this? By simple I mean, short of reframing or rehanging the door.
I don't want to use door stops. I'd just like to figure out how I can make the doors balanced enough to remain open at 5 or 20 or 40 or whatever number of degrees I've opened them.
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Check the hinges to see if they need tightening. You can also shim one of the hinges with thin cardboard which make just enough difference.
Wayne
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The simple solution is to remove 1 hinge pin, lay it on the concrete or workbench, smack it once to bend it slightly, reinstall. Done.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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If the door is set correctly, it will have a slight tendency to swing closed or open against the wall. Not many people hanging doors today even know that, let alone know how to achieve it. It appears yours was hung correctly.
However your question is how to keep it where you want it. The simple answer is to remove one or more hinge pins and bend them very slightly with a hammer.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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How's that Joe? Everything I've ever heard or read about hanging a door says to keep the hinge side of the frame plumb in all directions. That should create no tendancy for movement at any door position. Perhaps you're mistakenly thinking of a refrigerator door's correct operation? I'm thinking the OP has an out-of-plumb door jamb. The real way find out is to put a level on it. If it's out slightly in the same plane as the closed door, it may be corrected by shimming one of the hinges out. This however could muck with the reveal of the door and might cause it to bind. If the plumb is out perpendicular to the plane of the closed door, well, you're looking at rehanging it.
Bobby
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No that was from my father who spent many years doing doors as his specialty. However as you will note, I did say SLIGHT. If there is going to be an error made, or settling of the home, I would want it hung as he suggested. If it were neutral to start with, chances are close to 50% that over the years it will end up with a tendency to open itself and to swing from a full open (against the wall) position out.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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One of my doors does the same thing. I checked the wall and found it was 3/8" out of plumb. I removed one hinge, laid it on concrete and hit its center to bend it a bit. Did it twice to get enough bow to it to get it to bind enough to keep the door at whatever position I left it. Worked for a few months and now the door swings open again.

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On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 21:34:46 GMT, trader-of-some-jacks

Thanks to all who replied. I bent the hinge pins on the affected doors, and for now anyway - PROBLEM SOLVED!
I pity those who are around when I try removing the pins... but that's another problem for another day.
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