How Do I remove Headless 1/4" lag Bolts from Concrete?

Page 2 of 2  

wrote:

Are they actually bolts screwed into anchors that are embedded into the concrete?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Aug 12, 2:37 pm, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

They are likely driven into expanding aluminum anchors that were driven into holes drilled in the concrete. The galvanic reaction between the steel lag bolts and the aluminum anchors has fused them together permanently. They will not be coming out of there without a fight, and then the holes will not be usable afterward.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why go through all the agony suggested in these replies? Buy a Harbor Freight 3200 diamond hole saw and cut out the rusted bolts complete with a neat core of concrete. Then get some stainless bolts, pop them in the holes with some slow cure filled epoxy and replace your railing exactly where you want it. The depth of cut on the hole saw may require some chisel work to get you to the depth you want, but i've seen building maintenance guys do this easily on broken off toilet bolts, floor mounted partitions and the like. You may get more depth with a Milwaukee carbide hole saw, $15 or so. You should be able to cut a neat hole in ten or fifteen minutes, my guess. The pros do it in around five. Good luck.
Joe
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

just be careful if the slab is in poor condition.
I had a steel railing rust, and replaced.
a couple years later my mom grabbed the railing in a wind storm, the corners of the slab broke off, at the bolts.
my mom fell 10 feet but fortunately was ok....
you dont muck around with half ass fixes for key safety items.
one neighbor replaced her railing with a alunimum one, what a joke, she slipped on ice and broke it off
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm about to do what my neighbor did. Note: our front porches are pretty low - one step from the walkway and then one step to the porch.
First, he removed the old wrought iron railing, ground down the stubs and patched the holes.
Then he built a cedar framed railing with wrought-iron balusters. The uprights are made of ~7 foot 4 x 4's which were sunk down to the frost line *next* to the concrete porch. The upper and lower rails are 1 x 6 so the railing has some heft to it, as well as a surface to hold a drink or package.
An added advantage is the six inches or so of width he gained since the railings are off to the side.
A few plantings around the sides of the porch hide the 4x4's that run up along side the porch.
It's a really nice look.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DerbyDad03 posted for all of us...

-- Tekkie - I approve this advertisement/statement/utterance.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re: Not remotely what the OP asked about.
Sure is.
When the OP was asked *why* he needed to remove the bolts from the concrete, he replied:
"I need to remove the lags to put new flanges/lag bolts in for the new railing."
Many others have suggested that there are ways to install the new railing without removing the bolts, such as relocating the railing or the new flanges.
My suggestion is just one more option for installing a new railing without the need to remove the old bolts.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.