How Do I remove Headless 1/4" lag Bolts from Concrete?

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The 1/4" lag bolts for the railing supports in the front concrete porch steps have rusted away leaving headless 1/4" lag bolts imbedded in the concrete. How do I remove whats left of the bolts? I attempted to drill them out using an 1/8" drill bit but it could get started.
How can i remove the bolts? Some of the bolts are not broken off even with the concrete some of them are headless and bent slightly to one side.
Tom
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cut a slot in them with a dremel and use a screwdriver?
using a left handed drill bit could back them out enough to get a pair of vice grips on them
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I could try that but the appear to be quite deteriorated .
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You may need to put the new flanges in different spots. Grind them down and paint over may be a lot easier than gettting the old lags out. Hammer drill is useful for making holes in concrete.
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wrote:

I once had to remove anchors (nails driven in with an explosive charge) from concrete and simply used a circular saw (w/ eye protection).
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Tom wrote:

Do you need to remove them for some purpose, or are you just concerned with the busted stubs sticking up? If the latter, just grind them down flush with a 4" angle grinder and let it go. Patch and paint as necessary.
nate
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railing.
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Move over an inch and use new wedge-it bolts. After you grind the old ones off flush.
s

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Take a grinder and grind them down flush. Done.
s

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I fonly that would solve the problem. I've got to install flanges, same dimensions, over top the place where the original s stood.
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It may solve some of the problem. Can you turn the flange 90 degrees and use new holes? Or drill new holes in the flange at new locations?
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Not sure there is much we can do to help.
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No, you don't. Get that out of your head right now.
Even if you get the bolts out, new bolts will not grab in the old holes, even with new anchors.
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Depends on how well they are in there. You can use an "easy out". available at any decent hardwqare store. You drill a pilot hole, insert the easy out and with a wrench try to turn the lag out. Once started it can come easy, but if well stuck in the concrete it may be impossible.

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wrote:

Vice-grip brand vice-grips, put on tight or very tight, then hit with a hammer in the direction to unscrew the bolts. Especially the ones that are bent will be able to be turned.

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I would try drilling with a good high speed drill bit. It may be sacrificial, but use one at least the same dimension as the bolts or maybe start with something bigger then go smaller. Use a hammer and a pin punch to get a flat surface for the drill bit to sit on.
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.

Yes was going to say; grind the old ones flat, mark a significant punch hole to get drill started. Use good drill bits same size as bolts and drill carfully, you may break off the drill bit which could give you another problem!
OR: Grind flat, move new railing half to one inch over and drill new holes in concrete?
Do the new railings have to have identical mounting points as the old? Why?
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On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 06:44:53 -0400, "John Grabowski"

And use plenty of oil at the tip of the drill bit.
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Tom wrote:

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wrote:

the old holes will be too detoriated by the rusty bolts expanding to re use......
so grid off old bolts add flange and start over
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