How do I neutralize acid

I am using Muriatic acid which will go into the ground from cleaning a garage and wonder what hardware or grocery store product I can mix with water to neutralise run off. Would Baking Soda work?
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On 5/9/2008 5:53 PM ransley spake thus:

You mean there's actually something you *don't* know the answer to? I mean, you answer just about every friggin' post here.
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baking soda comes in 12 lb bags at sams club, we use it for our swimming pool to bring up the total alkalinity, it neutralizes sulphuric acid drain cleaner.
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On Fri, 9 May 2008 17:53:15 -0700 (PDT), ransley

Soda Ash and water.
I recently asked about acid washing a pool.
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Oren wrote:

Yep. AKA sodium carbonate, available in 5, 10, and 50 lb sizes at pool supply co. Call around for local price.
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wrote:

While baking soda will neutralize the acid that runs off into the soil, more than likely soil itself and the concrete you cleaned with it (assumption) can do the job just as well. Most of the chlorine comes off as gas and some gets converted into salts. In the long term its safe but in the short term it will kill bugs and grass
For what gets soaked into the concrete, use ammonia after it dries and you wash it first. Do this especially if you plan to seal it particularly acrylic surface sealer (as opposed to a penetrating sealer).
Muriatic is not the best for concrete, it will etch quite well but the fumes are bad and it can penetrate leaving oily looking spots which defy cleaning with just water and soap (hence my comment about sealers). I have to admit it is far cheaper and generally more aggressive than other products so in general a good choice.
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pipedown wrote:

We used muriatic to etch concrete prior to sealing. Just washed off with plain water, as, I'm sure, the instructions said we should. This was 2nd floor deck, with concrete walks, plants, and structural walls near. No effect on surrounding area. Dilute acid will probably help the lawn :o)
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Norminn wrote:

Be cautious about using ammonium hydroxide to neutralize hydrochloric acid. It will do the job, but if there is much HCl you may find all surfaces covered with a white film...ammonium chloride. This is harmless, it's called washing soda sometimes, but it makes a mess.
Boden
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On 5/10/2008 10:16 AM Boden spake thus:

Are you sure? I thought washing soda was sodium carbonate.
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Use a solution of Caustic soda, this re - acts with Hydrochloric Acid to form salt and water. HCL + NaOH = NaCL + H2O

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On Fri, 9 May 2008 17:53:15 -0700 (PDT), ransley

Household ammonia might be your best choice. You might see some (harmless) white smoke.
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A little plain old garden lime (ground limestone) would probably be the best choice, you might get a bit of dead turf where the runoff is heavy, the lime will correct that.
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On Fri, 9 May 2008 17:53:15 -0700 (PDT), ransley

If you have the dilution ratio right the acid should be neutral before it comes off the concrete. Unless you really want to be exposing the aggregrate you will be using 20:1 or so. It is better to use more of a dilute solution and a little time than to try to get it all at once with concentrate. The fumes and danger will be less too
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