How do I kill Birds of Paradise roots?


I cut them to the ground, put RoundUp on them, and they still grow back! How do I kill these darn things? Thank you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
i don't know but i searched and found your eradication of strelitzia: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=eradicating+Strelitzia&btnG=Google +Search be careful, also see: http://www.aspca.org/site/PageServer ? pagename=pro_apcc_toxic_birdofparadise/ "Dogs like to eat these plants, but the seeds, if eaten, are toxic, and can cause abdominal pain and vomiting." and more plant description at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strelitzia you might also phone your local university agricultural extension service.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Roundup is a selective herbicide and doesn't kill everything. Try a weed killer containing 2-4-D full strength from the bottle on those cut back stubs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2-4-D will kill top growth. Doesn't do much for killing roots except if you keep reapplying it will eventually starve the roots - read _after several years_.
I am unfamiliar with birds of paradise but if round-up takes a 10 or so days to kill the top growth then it is also killing the roots. May require reapplication over several years to get all of them though.
I have been spraying morning glory in the lawn for 20 years with 2-4- D and it still occasionally shows up. The real killing success I have had is with roundup. Trouble there is that it also kills the grass arund the morning glory.
Same with Canadian Thistle. Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually, it's the other way 'round -- glyphosate (Roundup, et al.) is a non-selective, systemic herbicide whereas 2,4-D is a broadleaf- specific selective herbicide. While there are a few plants that are glyphosate-resistant and some ag crops have been developed specifically ("Roundup-ready" is Monsanto trade name for cultivated crops that have been bred for over-the-top application), in general it will kill or severely damage almost all common decorative plants/ grasses.
Don't have specific data for susceptibility of Bird of Paradise to either, but time of year and strength of application and form of application are all potentially quite significant to success. I'd venture better luck in application on plant before severely pruning it back for better absorption/takeup, as that's the mechanism to get the herbicide introduced into the plant. However, as Roundup is non- selective and will damage if not kill virtually everything it comes in contact with, be extremely careful in application around anything of value such as shrubs, trees, valuable perennials, etc.
A good overview on usage is at http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil / hil-648.html
A look at the Roundup application label didn't find it listed but that could possibly be a case of such a small usage.
The suggestion to contact local Extension Service is a good one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What concentration of Roundup was used and how was it applied? Before cutting or after? It's absorbed through the leaves, so it should be applied to the full plant and left there for a couple days. They do specify less time, but longer is more certain. It takes a concentration of 6% or so to kill tough plants, but I've yet to encounter a plant around the house that it won't kill. I've used it at 6% on poison ivy with good success. And interesting thing, as someon previously pointed out, Monsanto has genetically modified soybeans, cotton, etc so that they are Roundup tolerant, at least to low to mod levels.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 29, 11:27 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

That "someone" would have been me.... :)
Appears he (OP) cut it to the ground first and tried to paint the remaining -- as you say, not the most effective application in all likelihood.
Monsanto has reformulated Roundup relatively recently to improve takeup and shorten "rainfree" time -- now it's 1-1/2 hr as opposed to the previous 6 hr. Once past that point in time, there's no turning back and neither rain nor snow nor... :) will have any discernible effect on it. Of course, even a few minutes w/ susceptible plants can be fatal under the right conditions. It appears that the new formulation is especially detrimental to conifers where before there were some applicators for grass or weed control in nursery/golf that weren't having to be particularly concerned about overspray are now finding them extremely susceptible.
As a side note, there are other seed suppliers as well as Monsanto w/ glyphosate-resistant crops, but "Roundup Ready" is a Monsanto TM which they protect vigorously. The patent having expired, there are now a multitude of generic suppliers although mostly they're seen at the wholesale/bulk level for ag use, not homeowner. And, they are indeed resistant to recommended useage levels that are effective for weed control -- up to roughly 2% which is about the upper limit for virtually all spray applications per label directions. Higher concentrations may be needed for wiper or paint-on application and are suitable for small-scale applications such as one would presume OP has rather than for widescale ag use.
OP might look into some of the other herbicides as well such as Dow's Remedy or DuPont's Cimarron -- both are suitable for woody perennials although my experience with them is for range/pasture application. Whether they're available except by permit where OP is, I don't know either -- being in ag production, have applicator status so don't have to worry from that standpoint.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Negative! Roundup is selective! Read the label and there are dozens of plants that roundup has little-to-no effect on. I can verify that by years of experience.
2,4-D is a broadleaf herbicide, but works very well on most woody plants, especially if they are cut back and the herbicide is applied full strength to the cambium layer of the plant. This takes the herbicide directly to the root. It's the best product I've found to prevent shoots from forming on cut stumps.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"Selective broad-spectrum weed control in Roundup Ready crops. Non- selective broad-spectrum weed control for many agricultural systems."
The non-selective part is only when used with Roundup Ready crops. As noted, there are some which aren't particularly effective, but it is definitely (other than as noted) a non-selective herbicide. I'm presuming OP's Bird of Paradise isn't bred to be Roundup Ready. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Again, no. Although the manufacturer states that it is "nonselective for turf weeds and grasses", you have to look closer. The manufacturer lists 37 weeds and grasses that glyphosate controls, yet there are 172 known weeds in the US. (http://web.aces.uiuc.edu / weedid/). This directly corresponds to my experience - it's good for some but useless for others. You cannot take Monsanto's term "nonselective" literally.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oh..., ok, I see. Monsanto doesn't label their own product correctly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Looks like you made the same mistake I did in removing some overly aggressive Algerian Ivy. I cut it back as close to the ground as I could, about six inches high. Then I sprayed the stumps with a mix of roundup and the other common brush killer and repeated whenever new foliage appeared. Coming into the third spring season, it looks like I have finally finished if off. Now, if the roots will please decay so the stumps can be pulled.
Clearly, I should have sprayed the vines when in full foliage before cutting them back. That should get a lot more of the herbicide down to the roots than can be accomplished by treating the stumps.
You'll probably just have to stay after them till they're gone. Be sure to use the high concentrations of herbicide others here in this thread have mentioned.
SJF
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Round up should work. Try letting the plant grow a bit and wait for leaves to appear then shoot it again. Round up works best on the green parts of plants, so the more green you can cover the better. It may take several attempts, just spray whenever you see leaves appear. Plants won't survive without leaves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

gasoline poured on them, it kills everything. when i was a kid it was used to kill vegatation. topday the same use gets people freaking out.
but its effective, no smoking in area
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, back then lots of people smoked cigarettes with abandon, worked with asbestos fibers all over the place, drove cars that spewed out 20 times the pollution of todays cars and buried toxic waste in any old hole. Doesn't mean any of that was smart or good for the environment.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agreed. Gasoline evaporates very fast and leaves no residual damage. Leaking underground gas tanks were dug up, the soil spread out & allowed to air dry for a few weeks, then declared safe for use. Diesel and kerosene is a whole different problem however.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah evaporating gasoline is of no consequence. It must have been just a whim when all cars had to incur increased cost and complexity for systems which now provide sealed gas tanks and canisters that trap gasoline fume emissions. Same thing when gas stations were all retrofited with new dispensing nozzles to trap fumes. But apparently it's ok to go pouring gasoline around to kill plants that are easily killed with products that are far safer for the environment.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 29, 8:43�pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

well you really cant know for certain the long term effects of herbicides.
i had a poision ivy problem, roundup didnt kill it.
a helpful person here suggested mixing it evenly with regular weed killer.
the combo was deadly to my poision ivy
the thing about gasoline is, a one time dump to kill something isnt as significant as millions of anything spewing fumes.
just look at how much must be released filling lawn mowers yearly
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And tractors, motorcycles, ATV's, chainsaws, weedeaters, generators, boat tanks, etc. etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Get a shovel and dig them up. I'm not familiar with Bird of Paradise, but when I want something gone I dig it up. Many plants are hard to kill. Some of them will send out runners and shoots when you whack them to the ground making it even harder to kill the plant. Dig them up and throw them away or give them to somebody who wants them.
-Felder
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.