How difficult is it to "build" a door?

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That's a very good point. I was kind of dancing around that when giving the reasons to use a pre-hung door. It makes it easy to get a perfect door that is square, closes properly, etc. I also said that he is underestimating the effort in building a door and HANGING it. The above though really nails it. It's a 50 year old framing job. Has he even put a square and level to it?

That's about where I'm at too. I just had visions of him spending a lot of $$ and time, screwing around, building a door. Then he goes to hang it and finds out the framing is out of square. Then he spends hours trying to make it fit that opening. Or that it warps 6 months later. I'm not a big fan of re-inventing the wheel when suitable solutions are readily available.
Best advice I can give at this point is either fix the old door or look at videos of how doors are installed.
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On Thu, 12 Jul 2012 12:01:53 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

It's an unfinished garage. Mine is the same as his, except it's a solid door. I don't know where you get the idea framing isn't normally square, or doubled 2x4 studs and headers "sag." And those are bigger actual size 2x4's then what they cut now. My circa '59 is still square. A pre-hung door is what would look out of place in an unfinished garage. He never posted a decent close-up of the door stiles, or hinges. Loosened stile-to-rails makes a door sag. A loosened upper hinge makes a door sag. Anybody can check with a simple square. Every sagging door I've fixed was fixed by resetting the hinges tight because the screws had pulled out. A drill, dowels and glue.

Yep. Seeing the door, it's a nice one, and I'd try to keep it, even if I had to take it apart. Don't know if he can do it though.
--
Vic

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The RO for the side door in my 1956 unfinished garage is not square. The RO for my front entry door is not square.
That's what shims are for.

So what? Mine are too. How does size enter into discussion regarding square?

Good for you. Seriously.

Looks just fine in mine. Out of place? Not in the least.
I recently replaced mine but the original 1956 door had a jamb also.
The RO was obviously framed for a door with a jamb.

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+1 to that. Framing members are in fact frequently not perfectly square or even straight. Just take a look at a typical 2x4 in the pile at HD. Even if you took extra care to make the ones for a door frame perfectly square when nailing, you still have variations in the 2 x 4's themselves that make them unsuitable compared to a shimmed door jamb. Then you have to make the rough opening a precision opening. It would be like requiring that a kitchen cabinet cutout be precise to 1/16" all the way around to fit an oven instead of making it a rough opening that makes it easy and allows for tolerance. That's why the door jamb, plus shims are used. And why most doors are sold as pre-hung, to make the installation easy and relatively foolproof.

+1
I don't see why a pre-hung door would look out of place in a 1950's detached garage either. From the pics, this garage already has vinyl siding, what about that?

If he can't repair the original door, which doesn't look bad at all, then I seriously doubt any door that he builds from scratch is going to look better in that garage than a pre-hung. That's why we presented a pre-hung as an option. But from all I've seen and heard I think repairing the existing door is the best option.
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On 7/11/2012 2:22 PM, Puddin' Man wrote:

existing door to remove and stop the sagging? They cost about $10.
I doubt that your door is 1 1/4 ". A normal sized door is 1 3/8 or 1 3/4
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Good luck in having that plywood stay flat. Or even START flat.
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Puddin' Man wrote:

I am surprised that you are having a problem finding a replacement door that is that size. 32 x 80 is a standard size. I don't remember the standard thickness, so I don't know if they are 1.25 inches thick. But a door that is not exactly the same thickness can still be installed by either adjusting the trim or having Building a new one seems like it would be a real project and a pain to have to do.
For those who didn't see the original "Sagging Garage Door" post (I had to look it up), here it is:
--------------- I have a detached garage (built in 1955) door made of wood segments joined by woodwork that looks something like tongue-in-groove flooring. Replacing the door is probably impractical.
On the garage door, some of the grooves are working loose making one end of the door sag. I had to plane the knob end of the door to keep it from scraping the floor. Worked for a while, now it scrapes again.
You can see what is going on if you view the following Photobucket pix 1-at-a-time:
http://i1156.photobucket.com/albums/p576/Puddin_Man/GarageDoor06-2012002.jpg
http://i1156.photobucket.com/albums/p576/Puddin_Man/GarageDoorCU06-2012001.jpg
http://i1156.photobucket.com/albums/p576/Puddin_Man/GarageDoorCUII06-2012002.jpg
In the last pic, the lower segment of the door is pulling away at top-of- segment. If the joints are loose enough to allow the observed sagging, it seems like it should be possible to reverse the sagging (i.e. by storing the door upside down or somesuch) and then reinforce it to hold true. But I havent figgered out how.
Does anybody know of any tricks/techniques for reinforcing/repairing such wood doors? -------------
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Yeah, take it apart and reglue with waterproof glue.
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TomR wrote:

http://i1156.photobucket.com/albums/p576/Puddin_Man/GarageDoorCUII06-2012002.jpg
Heck, for that I'd just use lag bolts, way easier than trying to take the door apart or build a new one...
1. Counter sink three 1" +- holes centered on the edge of the hinge stile deep enough so heads of bolts won't interfere with door action. They need to be of sufficient diameter to accomodate the head of the lag and a socket to drive it. Put the holes about 1 1/2" from top/bottom of rail and roughly in its center.
2. Clamp the door so stile and rail are mated and - using a long bit - drill pilot holes through the stile and into the rail to accomodate the lags. Plan to use 3/8" lags, maybe even 1/2", 5/16 minimum, and make your pilot holes so that you have at least 1" of lag in the stile and 2" in the rail. More is better within reason.
2a. Optional: Run in the lags then remove and work some super glue into the holes in the rail with a skewer. The reason is that the lags will be in end grain in the rail and the threads that the lag cuts into the wood will be weak. Super glue firms them up very nicely. Let the glue dry - if you can smell it, it isn't dry. When dry, redrill.
3. Put in the lags, use a washer under the head.
4. Fill the countersink holes with a piece of glued in dowel or with Bondo.
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Rather than super glue, why not just fill the holes partially with epoxy and then run the lags in? Let it all cure together.
No need to drill twice.
Just a thought.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

He could but he'd need to leave it clamped up for a couple of days while the epoxy cured.
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dadiOH
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wrote:

epoxy hardened - no clamping or jigging required.
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dadiOH wrote:

After looking at the pix again, do the middle rail too. But two lags rather than three.
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dadiOH wrote:

After still another look, ALL the rail/stile joints have failed. Can't see the top ones but they are undoubtedly bad too. To do the job right, all the joints should be fastened.
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