How difficult is it to "build" a door?

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I called. Evidently it's just a yard full of junk. I asked if they *might* have an ext. door 1.25" in thickness. Poor gal had noooooooo idea.

Habitat Restore. I've already done a walk-thru, but their stuff is so disorganized I wouldn't be surprised if I walked right by one. Will likely go back. Without AC it's brutal in there.

Ah, lemme see ... whasis? $400 for the bits, $500 for a router rig (but I'd need to stop and build the table?)?? :-)

Maybe if it drags into Sept. and I'm not in a strait-jacket.

Yes, yes, I've been in -that- situation ...
HD has got a Jeld-wen steel-skin 32 x 79 x 1.75" for $96. It's close, but it'd be a headache.
Thanks, P
"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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On 7/11/2012 4:32 PM, Puddin' Man wrote: ...

I found several six-panel wood or fiberglass at various Menard's over the country from $25 to $75 from their returned/never picked/etc.
That kind of place is another possibility for cheap if that's the ultimate goal...
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It's part of it.
No Menards within 100+ mi.
P
"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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On 7/11/2012 10:35 PM, Puddin' Man wrote: ...

Didn't say it _had_ to be Menards...others must deal w/ same things...
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2012 16:32:45 -0500, Puddin' Man

Only if you are over 79 inches tall or have a real spring in your step - - - - -.

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Puddin' Man wrote:

Naturally, I wouldn't worry about it. The last door I built as i described was to enclose the water heater - not to worry, there are vents in the door - in our laundry. This is in Florida and the laundry is the hottest and most humid place in the house. Built it maybe 10 years ago, still flat as a pancake.
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dadiOH
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2012 06:58:26 -0500, Puddin' Man

corners, glued and through dowelled. Cut the rabbets in the rails with a table saw(dado) or router. Same with the lap joints. Much simpler than Mortise and Tenon and almost as strong.
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2012 06:40:39 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"
wrote:

That's one potential problem. But the biggest is the thickness. I foresee problems mounting a 1 3/4" door in opening designed for 1 1/4".

Too much hassle and expense. Frame looks OK for the application.
To a material extent, I'd *like* to make my own b/c I can do it in my nice, cool bsmt. workshop whilst the old door secures the gar. It's too damned hot outside (and my health is failing).
P
"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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Why do you think that that will be an issue? If hinged correctly, wouldn't the thicker door just extend past the narrower jamb? Scab a piece of 3/4 x 1/2 wood around the jamb as an extension, fill the seam with wood putty, paint and no one will ever know. You'll need to do a little work on the lockset openings, but you could fill in that section of the jamb with new wood and cut new holes.
I'm just tossing that out there...perhaps you know something that will prevent you from doing that.
BTW...Have you looked at a home-parts store, the places that sell old doors, windows, etc.? The places near me have hundreds of doors of all styles, sizes and thicknesses. I just picked up a 6-panel pine door, a jamb, 2 hinges and a lockset for under $30 total for my son's basement apartment.

Installing a pre-hung door is more hassle than building a new door from scratch? Really? Nothing personal, but you came here asking "How difficult is it to "build" a door?" If you don't already know how to build a door, how do you know it's less hassle than installing a prehung door?
If you can find a used one at a house parts place, I'll bet it will be cheaper than the material to build a new one.

Of course, there a lot to be said for "I built that!" No argument there.

It will get cooler you know. ;-)
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You can get a basic pre-hung entry door for $100. What is it going to cost to construct a door? As for hassle, it's far simpler to put in a pre-hung door than it is to build your own door. Much harder to screw up too. That's why pros do it that way.
As for aggravation, wait until you've spent hours building the door, many more hours of aggravation because it won't fit, close, etc in the frame from the previously sagging door, etc....

Can you wait until Fall? Taking out an old door, frame and all and replacing it should be a one day job. At least to the point that it's secure again. You could take off the trim day 1. Then pull the old door and get the new one in day 2. If needed just secure the door with a piece of wood instead of a lock. Day 3 install lock, trim, etc.
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2012 10:25:37 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"
wrote:

A good bit less than $100, the way I (mistakenly) conceptualized it.

Try this: the garage was built in 1955. There is no frame around this door, just double 2x4's. Shoddy construction, I suppose, but that's how they sometimes did it back then.
I had hoped for a simple fix. Doesn't now look that way.
P
"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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re: "There is no frame around this door..."
First, let's make sure we are using the correct terminology. It's call a "jamb", not a "frame".
30" is a standard door width and a prehung 30" door should fit in your rough opening since it fit a 32" door without a jamb. The jamb will be about 1 1/2" wide total, so you"ll have room for shims to square it all up. Yes, you will lose 2" of opening and only you can tell us if that will be an issue.
One issue might be the height. Since you have no jamb, it's hard for us to say whether an 80" pre-hung door with threshold and jamb will fit. You may need to get a shorter door or one without a threshold or adjust the header.
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Agree. Normally you'd have framing consisting of 2x4's and then a door jamb. But it sounds like he has no jamb? Which is weird because then without a jamb on the sides you would have exposed not only the 2 x 4's, but also the edge of the sheathing on the outside, so how is that sealed against the rain? And on the inside, where the 2 x4 ends, you'd be seeing the edge of the drywall or whatever the interior material is. In other words, you'd see what you usually see when you take off the jamb. Can he tell us that is what he has?

Agree. If I understand what he's saying, he has a 2x4 door frame that is 32" wide. A 30" door should then fit between the existing framing.

That's a good point. The height could be an issue. But it looks like HD has one that is a 30X78:
http://www.homedepot.com/buy/doors-windows-doors-entry-doors-front-doors/jeld-wen-30-in-x-78-in-steel-white-pre-hung-right-hand-inswing-6-panel-entry-door-166458.html
If we had more info I think we might find a solution that's a lot easier than building a new door.
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2012 15:43:50 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"
wrote:

That is essentially what I have. There are some 1 x 2 strips nailed to the 2x4 frames -outside-, against which the door closes. Otherwise it's all 2x4's.

It's undesirable. Best to restore what they did back in '55.

No!
I just took measurements against one of these at the local HD this afternoon. It's close but no cigar. And it's steel-skin.

I've just about given up on "build new". Was just an idea.
Thanks, P
"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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What they did back in '55 was wrong. They hung a door slab in a RO with no jamb. Why would it be best to restore what they did in '55? Is Better Homes and Gardens coming to put your house on some historic homes list? Oh wait...1955? I don't think so.
So if you want to restore it back to what they did in '55, why can't you just buy a 32" door and hang it the same way they did? This thread has gotten so long that I don't recall if you ever told us why a 32" x 80" slab won't just fit into the opening. As far as I can tell, the extra thickness of doors today should not be an issue since the door opens in.
.....

"No" to what?
You said you have a 32" door. You said you have no jamb.
Therefore the width of your opening must be just a bit wider than 32"
A prehung 30" door requires a 32" rough opening to allow for the jamb and some shims.
I ask again "No" to what?

How about telling us what "close but no cigar" means. Too big? Too small? Too wide? To short? What exactly is the problem with a 30 x 78 prehung door.
BTW...they make 30 x 78 wooden doors too. And guess what? Wooden doors can be trimmed down if they are too big. BTDT.
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Then what happens when those 2x4's meet the sheathing, siding, etc? Same thing inside the garage? Normally those areas would be covered, sealed against the weather by the door jamb and casement molding. A couple of pics of this would be a great help in making suggestions.

Agree. That door was installed incorrectly according to not only the practices of 1955, but probably 100+ years before that. Sure, if it's something vintage that's consistent with that period, then it's worth preserving, but I'm not getting that here.
When I do repairs, if what was done before was wrong, then if I have an opportunity to do it right, I will. And in this case, from what I've heard so far, doing it right not only sounds possible, but I suspect it's less work than building a new door from scratch and will produce a much better finished product.

I asked a few posts ago what the fitment issue was. AFAIK, all we have to go on is this:
"What with the Big Heat, etc, it's not practical to repair the door. Have been to Lowes, Restore, etc. Can't find suitable replacement. How difficult is it to "build" a door? 32 x 80 x 1.25"?
I didn't pay much attention to the first part. But re-reading it, if climate is the big concern, why not just wait until Sept and repair the existing door? Or, alternatively, take off the door, fix it in the cool basement where he's proposing to build a door, and put up a sheet of plywood temporarily to secure the opening. It's just a garage entry door, so securing it in that fashion should be easy.

I think we have a failure to communicate here.....

If I had to guess, it's because his existing door has no door jamb, no TRIM MOLDING and he's unfamiliar with how a door is normally installed. So, he's looking for something that has to fit EXACTLY to what's there, instead of fitting in loosely in a rough opeing, then being SHIMMED, which is what you do with a pre-hung.
I'd suggest he find some videos of how doors are supposed to be installed online. Putting in a new pre-hung and cutting some moldings sounds a lot easier and more within the skill grade of a typical home project than building a door. And in this case, it would make what is apparently an oddball, half-assed door into a normal one.
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wrote:

Derby, did you see the pics Puddin posted in the other thread about the door? I just found them and saw them for the first time:
http://i1156.photobucket.com/albums/p576/Puddin_Man/GarageDoorCU06-2012001.jpg
http://i1156.photobucket.com/albums/p576/Puddin_Man/GarageDoor06-2012002.jpg
It looks to me like what's there is a normal door rough opening AND JAMB. He said the door was attached directly to the framing 2 x4's, but I don't see that. It looks like the door is attached to the door jamb, as you'd expect.
So, doing the math, he says the door is 32". From the pic I'm guessing the door jamb is 1". That gives a rough opening of 34". A pre-hung 32 x 80 door would fit in there. At least width wise.....
See what you think....
We're lacking most of the basic information here and I think also having a problem communicating about door. I think part of it is that he believes constructing a new door is going to be easier and substantially cheaper than installing a pre-hung. And I think you and I agree that he's underestimating the difficulty of building a door and getting it hung properly and overestimating the difficulty of installing a pre-hung. Price wise, the material cost is going to eat up a lot of the cost of a $100 pre-hung. And the finished result of the pre-hung is likely to be superior too.
Also, seeing the pics, it seems the door that is there now isn't in that bad shape and could be fixed using some of the suggestion made in the other thread. That would seem to me to be a LOT easier than building a new door and likely to give a better finished look. It would surely be the lowest cost option too. It's probably what I would do given what can be seen from the pics.
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On Thu, 12 Jul 2012 08:56:02 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"
wrote:
1.)
http://i1156.photobucket.com/albums/p576/Puddin_Man/GarageDoorInside07-2012002.jpg
http://i1156.photobucket.com/albums/p576/Puddin_Man/GarageDoorInside07-2012001.jpg
http://i1156.photobucket.com/albums/p576/Puddin_Man/GarageDoorInside07-2012003.jpg
2.) If all I had to depend on were your construction practices, I would go pre-hung.
3.) The door -and- it's lack of framing worked OK, as is, for the 27 years I've been here. In that context, I have no need for standard construction practices. If there were a problem with my front door, I'd go pre-hung.
The problem is particular to the door. If I can rectify and re-hang (or replace and re-hang), thats what I want to do.
Anybody understand??? :-)
Thx, P
"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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I think we all understand that the problem is particular to the door. Derby and I suggested a pre-hung because you were proposing to build a new door. IMO, and I believe Derby agrees, it's easier and probably about the same cost to just replace the whole thing with a pre-hung. And in most cases, if replacing the door, I would go with a pre-hung because it's easier, faster, than screwing around and trying to make a new door fit the old jamb, whatever is there.
Given the pics you posted in the other thread, I don't understand why you don't take some of the suggestions made there to just repair the existing door. It does not appear to be in that bad shape. It's probably what I would do. It would be very cheap and easy.
If it comes to replacing the door, then given what I can see in the new pictures I would do one of two things. If you can live with a 30" wide door, that should fit in there, at least width wise. The existing door is 32", perfect for a pre-hung 30" That's why a pre-hung works and the doors you're looking at won't fit. It only depends on a rough opening size.
Yet when that was suggested you say that won;t work, with just a "No". So, it's not clear what the fitment problem with that is.
The other choice would be to go with a new 32" door. The framing is completely exposed on the inside of the garage. You could take out the existing door framing and re-frame it to the larger opening. That seems like an easier path to me, than building and hanging a new door. You're dealing with 2 x 4's, shims, and some trim molding.
You're free to do what you want. I just think you're under estimating the difficulty of building and hanging a door that looks anywhere near as good as a pre-hung. And over estimating the difficulty of putting in a pre-hung.
And I'm not sure I get the idea of running around looking for salvage doors. Any of those are going to require re-work, unless you think the lock holes are going to match. Yeah, that can be fixed, but why would you do that instead of just fixing the old door that apparently only has minor problems? Or at least trying that first?
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We are no longer sure what the OP wants.
We've suggested repairing the existing door, trying to find a used door, using a thicker door (if there is no jamb, why is that an issue?) or installing a prehung door, the way it should have been done years ago.
Nothing seems to meet his wants (notice I didn't say his *needs*).
Hurting Hair is an accurate description of how I feel at this point.
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