How can I solder a pipe that has a bit of water in it?

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"copper tubing in a heating system" implies that it will again be pressurized, typically to around 20 psig, once the repair is completed -- and may be carrying some *very* hot water.

You don't want breadcrumbs circulating around inside a heating system. They're not good for the valves.

But does it work (a) under pressure, or (b) at higher temperatures than are normally encountered in domestic hot water use? Residential hydronic heating systems typically operate at pressures around 20 psig and temperatures of 160 to 185 degrees F.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2007 19:54:49 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I know that, but I wasn't sure if he planned to ever use this zone again. I thought maybe it was out of use, but still leaking.

Okey dokey

Never tried that. I somewhat doubt it but I'm not sure, especially if the stuff was wrapped around the whole circumference of the pipe.

I don't think this would be a problem. I once used PC-70 to patch a leaking pan, and then, atypcially, I left the pan on the stove and boiled out all the water, and left it on the stove even after that for a while. After it cooled of, it still didn't leak, even on the stove.
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I have used epoxy, but it specifies the pipe has to be dry. I have also bought, at a store going out of business, a CA glue that says that a small amount of water does not matter. I can't verify it actually works, as I haven't used it yet. But that is exactly what I bought it for.
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It says that even for room temp and no pressure I bet. That's one of the times PC-70 is good.

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If you are afraid of the bread method . . . .
Often you can cut apart more of the pipe. You don't tell what is causing the drip, but cut out enough pipe to get beyond it. Solder up all the low joints and save a high joint for the final solder work.
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I've had success with a wet pick-up vacuum. I connected the vacuum to a nearby faucet (open) and kept is running while soldering. Might not work in all cases, but, it has worked for me.
Stubby wrote:

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That's pretty clever -- I'll remember that one. Thanks. I like that.
Probably won't work for Stubby, though. He's working on a hydronic heating system, not a domestic water supply, and probably doesn't have any faucets available to him:

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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

I recently came across this website:
http://www.justforcopper.com /
They make what appears to be an epoxy-type bonder for joining copper pipe. It's about $13 from Amazon.com. I've never used it, so I can't vouch for it, but you can read a review of it at http://www.kk.org/cooltools /.
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2007 13:56:37 -0400, Stubby

You might be interest in a product, that I came across just a few days from the Family Handyman magazine May 2001 issue (pg 95). The Topic "Plumbling Pipe Pluggers." They are available in:
http://www.wmharvey.com/prod/cat7/dissolvable.php
..
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if there is a water flow than you have to try to close the flow... if it is closed but water still flows slowly... you can stuff the pipe with sandwich bread a couple of slices... this will absorb the water giving you time to do your soldering.
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snipped-for-privacy@g-mail.com wrote:

I finally located a pair of 3/4" compression joints ($10 each!). But these require cutting the pipe stubs in the channel in the slab. So I decided to try the old bread trick with the existing stubs properly prepared and use a pair of standard sweat repair fittings. If it failed, I would have to do the cutting to use my compression fittings.
Luck was with me! The bread trick worked. Thanks to all that offered advice.
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Just stuff some white bread into the wet pipe, as far as possible. It will dissolve and discharge through the faucet when the water is restored.
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Walter
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Missed the part about that being in a hot-water heating system, didja?
No faucet.
No way to get the bread out.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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