How can I solder a pipe that has a bit of water in it?

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I'm trying to insert a 6" section of 3/4" copper tubing in a heating pipe that runs through a channel in my house slab. I have the zone disabled, the water into the boiler turned off, the drain valve on that zone open and a spigot used to release air and facilitate draining open.
But there is a constant drop of water in one side of the pipe that I intend to solder. I know I can't solder a wet pipe. I'm reluctant to try the old bread trick. Is there any kind of "solder", maybe epoxy that will work with the wet pipe?
Suppose I fail in the repair attempt (this is the third time!). Is there some sort of clamp that will seal off the leaking joint?
TIA.
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wrote:

You could try one of the new compression fittings that don't require soldering. http://www.hatcreekoutfit.com/xcart/customer/product.php?productid 90&catV1&page=1 They're sold at the big box stores.
R
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2007 11:25:57 -0700, RicodJour

Thanks. I see this works with Pex ... good to know.
-- Oren
"I don't have anything against work. I just figure, why deprive somebody who really loves it."
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RicodJour wrote:

http://www.hatcreekoutfit.com/xcart/customer/product.php?productid 90&catV1&page=1
Rico,
Since when have compression fittings been "new". I have been using them for about 30 years, albeit that was on industrial jobs as a tubing fitter. What is new about these?
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2007 23:15:02 GMT, Robert Allison

Not to speak for Rico, but this fitting would be "new" to me. It works on Pex; apparently, and I am a first time owner of Pex plumbing.
-- Oren
"I don't have anything against work. I just figure, why deprive somebody who really loves it."
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New style, Bob. Also new to the big box stores, new to residential construction (aimed at DIYer), new packaging and new to you if you've never seen them before. ;)
R
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http://www.hatcreekoutfit.com/xcart/customer/product.php?productid 90&catV1&page=1
With a boiler heater I would recommend a flare fitting over compression. It is a bit more work and you need to get a flare tool, but it would be a better solution given the application.
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You're assuming the OP has soft copper?
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2007 18:49:18 -0700, marson wrote:

Why wouldn't it be? Pressure?
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He didn't say one way or the other. Better find out before you start trying to sell him on flare fittings.
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2007 19:02:12 -0700, marson wrote:

Well I wasn't trying to sell the OP on anything because you're right in there was too little info.
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What would make flare fittings a better choice than compression in this application?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wad up some bread til doey ,stuff it in the pipe and solder
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote in

--
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My limited understanding of using the "bread trick" is that is needs to be flushed out through a faucet(s) with the aerator removed to clear the line. Can one do this on a boiler?
-- Oren
"I don't have anything against work. I just figure, why deprive somebody who really loves it."
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Clark wrote:

If it gets stuck in your closed boiler system, you're toast.
--
I couldn\'t resist.

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Soggy toast?
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Clark wrote:

It ain't milk toast.
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Postulate a group whose intent is to destroy the United States from within
via anarchy and bankruptcy. The actions of the United States Congress are
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I'd go for the compression fittings. I had a similar problem with an old house and rather fragile Cu. water pipes, that I didn't want to take a torch to, and could not be drained. However, I used the conventional compression fittings that you put on with a PAIR of wrenches. Cleaned stuff down good first, and lubricated everything lightly with silicon grease. Sold the house a couple of years ago, and as far as I know, the fix worked.
There are some water soluble plugs -- have seen them, but not used them -- which can be inserted to keep water out. They then dissolve in a couple of hours. Look like big vitamin pills/gel caps.
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2007 13:56:37 -0400, Stubby

Are you then going to turn something on so that it is under presssure again??? Or will it from now on have no more than a drip which can also drain through the other end of the pipe?

I don't know what is wrong with the bread trick, and I can't tell if your pipe is very close to the slab or not, but to answer your specific question, PC-70 will go on to a wet, even a dripping sink drain and cure and patch the leak. But the drain had next to zero water pressure, even when the faucet was on. BEcause it was on the side of the pipe, maybe wrapped around it, the mixture kept falling off slowly, and I would have to push it back up until it hardened enough not to fall. I think it sets in 15 minutes. Great stuff with lots of uses. Lasts for years and years if one doesn't let any of A touch B. The pair of four ounce cans is a lot cheaper per ounce, but the small size (one two-ended cardboard tube) is sold at HD.

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