How can I repair cracks in facia boards

The facia boards on my (single story) house are rough sawn 2 x 12.
Due to constant sun exposure (Southern California) the boards have developed cracks and fissures, some 1/4" wide, 1/2" deep and 5' long.
I have patched the cracks with exterior caulk and repainted them. However, due to the different rate of expansion between the caulk and the wood, the caulk keeps popping out.
Due to the deep cracks, the boards have developed some dry-rot, which I have repaired successfully.
How can I get the caulk to stay in the cracks? Replacing the boards would be a major undertaking.
Thanks for any help
--
Walter
www.rationality.net
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Walter R. wrote:

I doubt you'll be able to stop the checking. A big piece of wood like that has all sorts of internal stresses from changes in temperature and humidity. Those stresses have to be resolved the only way they can - by gaps opening up.
You didn't mention how long those fascia boards have been in place, but your periodic caulking and painting is the only "solution".
R
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The best caulk only last a few years. If it was me I would seal with thin epoxy, the one for dry rot and then fill it with Bondo and paint with something like Kelly-Moore elastomer (elastic polymer) paint which will expand and contract with the wood.
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wrote:

The name escapes me, but there is a tube of caulk, cost is about $7.00 that is actually used in railroad car construction...it's said it will stick to lard and clothes! (poly -something)
Oren
At this moment I do not have a personal relationship with a computer. Janet Reno, Attorney General 24 May 1998
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(Walter R.) says...

Just cover them with painted metal fascia trim. Any metal siding contractor can bend up the flashing on the job and install it for you, or you can make up a materials list and take it to a metal roofing and siding shop to have the materials fabricated. You can choose an appropriate factory color, or paint it yourself.
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Bad idea, IMHO. any water that gets trapped behind will just rot the wood faster. If you skin the fascia, at least do not do a wrap around the backside unless you put in lots of weepholes. The idiot that did my house (long before I bought it) did a no-weep install, and it led to water tracking back along the soffit, and back into the wall. The guy that changed out the rotted window fine-tuned the fascia skin with vise-grips so some of the water would drain, but I can still stick my finger in the drain hole and come back with rotted wood on it. Dreading replacing the roof next year-once they open it up, I'm sure to have lots of expensive wood replacement needed.
aem sends...
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: > (Walter R.) says... : > > The facia boards on my (single story) house are rough sawn 2 x 12. : > > : > > Due to constant sun exposure (Southern California) the boards have : developed : > > cracks and fissures, some 1/4" wide, 1/2" deep and 5' long. : > > : > > I have patched the cracks with exterior caulk and repainted them. : However, : > > due to the different rate of expansion between the caulk and the wood, : the : > > caulk keeps popping out. : > > : > > Due to the deep cracks, the boards have developed some dry-rot, which I : have : > > repaired successfully. : > > : > > How can I get the caulk to stay in the cracks? Replacing the boards : would be : > > a major undertaking. : > : > Just cover them with painted metal fascia trim. Any metal siding : > contractor can bend up the flashing on the job and install it for you, : > or you can make up a materials list and take it to a metal roofing and : > siding shop to have the materials fabricated. You can choose an : > appropriate factory color, or paint it yourself. : > : Bad idea, IMHO. any water that gets trapped behind will just rot the wood : faster. If you skin the fascia, at least do not do a wrap around the ....
Actually, that's a pretty good way to go. As long as it's installed properly (directions for the diyer are easy to find if needed) it will not rot the wood behind it, or cause rot or trap water. It's a good way to go and I haven't had to touch mine in over 20 years. This summer I insulated a back porch and when I removed the soffit and facia, the wood was as pristine as the day it was last painted. And still tightly nailed in place.
PopS
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On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 19:23:30 GMT, "ameijers"
:Dreading replacing the roof next year-once :they open it up, I'm sure to have lots of expensive wood replacement needed. Probably not as much replacement needed as my roof, which is going to be done last week in October, if the schedule holds. What has to be done had to be done. I am trying to learn enough about the roofer's trade now to help make sure the job's done right. Any suggestions, welcome.
Dan
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