How can I dampen the sound of water running thru my pipes?

We recently bought a new build house. We are very pleased with it and it seems to be built good and solid (unlike our last house).
One thing that irks me is that water running thru the pipes is very noticable when I have the outside sprinklers on, or if someone is taking a shower (and when the bath is being run it sounds like the ceiling is going to come crashing down).
I figure there's not a lot I can do about the pipes inside the walls, but I wonder what I can do to deaden the sound from the pipes in the basement, which are all exposed. Would simply adding foam insulation help or would I have to do something on a more larger scale? The basement pipes are all ceiling level so they are close to the floor on the main floor, which is probably why they're so loud.
Thanks
-Otter
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Otter wrote:

In my home it is the meter that makes the noise. I suspect it needs replaced, but I have not bothered.
As for the pipes themselves there are two approaches. First you want to reduce the transfer of vibration between the pipe and the framing. Adding some sort of material to separate the pipe from the framing is good. Foam or rubber between the pipe and the hanger devices used should help.
Next is the sound coming from the pipe itself. Pipe insulation may help, pay special attention to any connections where the pipe bends etc.
Good Luck.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Just went through this myself. But I had the walls open. Basically I insulated all of the hot pipes and then took plumbers tape (strapping tape) and screwed the pipes down on every stud. http://www.plumbingworld.com/tapes.html
I strapped down all of the cold water pipes on every stud and changed the hose bibs out from gate valves to ball valves. Noise from the back hose bib is reduced ~20-30% Noise from the front is gone. If your pipes are in holes you could use door shims to wedge the pipe to the stud. My biggest source of noise was my water heater. Inside, basically center of the home. I got the biggest reduction when those pipes were strapped down and insulated.
Good luck finding and reducing the source of the noise.
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Bigger pipes = slower speed = less noise.
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On the drain side you could convert to cast iron pipes. In basement should be pretty easy to do with little disruption. It would involve opening walls and ceiling elsewhere.

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use ear plugs
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Turn the water off
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As well as other responses you've gotten, it may help to reduce the pressure.
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Thick pipe insulation is best: cover everything you can with the insulation. You can get it on-line at: http://www.soundproofing.org/sales/pipe.htm
BJ Nash

BJ Nash Super Soundproofing Senior Technical Advisor Super Soundproofing Co. www.soundproofing.org Ph: (760) 752-3030 FAX: (760) 752-3040 E-mail: snipped-for-privacy@soundproofing.org TOLL FREE: (888) 942-7723
Visit us at: www.soundproofing.org
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