How Best to Repaint Metal Return-Air Grille?

We are having a room with high walls repainted in a deep color. The same wall has a typical return-air grille (24 x 24") with adjustable vanes that has the usual factory-baked enamel, off-white color. We wish to repaint the grille, so that it blends into the wall color, rather than standing out in stark contrast.
It would seem that using an enamel or gloss paint is necessary, so the grille may be cleaned periodically. Would it be best to use a primer? Should the grille be sanded first? To achieve a smooth finish, should the grille be sprayed?
What is the best way to do this job?
Any advice appreciated.
Thanks.
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tacker wrote:

As I've been working my way through the house painting and fixing I've tackled each air-grille as I've come to it. My experience may not apply directly to your situation since mine are retrofitted into the ceiling and my ceilings are mostly pure white. I've had perfect adhesion and coverage by placing the grille into the dishwasher and running through a normal wash/hot-dry cycle to remove all oils and dust and then I've primed and painted the grilles using standard spray can enamels.
It is possible to obtain custom can spray paints or at least it used to be so that might be one way to tackle your situation.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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This agrees with my experience. TB
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tacker wrote:

I remove them, clean them and then brush on the same paint that is going on the walls. They all look good to me.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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I remove them, clean them and then brush on the same paint that is going on the walls. They all look good to me.
-- Joseph Meehan
Agreed! If they are shiney sand lightly for better painy adhesion. running thru dishwasher after sanding a excellent idea
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A spray can like this http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber02 can be used to spray the wall paint or any other enamel you buy in a can.
So many colors of normal spray paint available, I'm sure you can find something you like.
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PipeDown wrote:

You can also work in reverse. I found a spray color I kinda liked then got the exterior house paint to match. Touch up is easy now.
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I would use a spray paint in a semi-gloss. It need not be a precise match
I used regular wall paint to paint my registers. At first they looked OK, at best. After a few years they looked crummy and made the rooms look old. I bought new grilles. The difference is like day and night, although the new registers are white and the walls are of-white.
--
Walter
www.rationality.net
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I agree with the methods of those who replied but I take it one step further. I "bake" any metal I paint. I use the BBQ grill and bake for one hour on most items. Baking the paint makes it adheres much better, eliminates future chips and flakes and holds its' luster much longer.
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On 17 Feb 2006 15:50:12 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@bluebottle.com wrote:

Everyones had some good ideas. But most seem like over kill to me. As Joe Meehan said clean it & paint it. Why make a big deal out of it. It's just a vent.
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